A bean field full in blossom smells as sweet (The Bean Field) 20 I 302; Ch 208; AS 164; T II 430; PJCM 158; TSP 309; EF 133; OA 388; LP 574

A beautiful flower that bedeckt a mean pasture, B2 244; C2 49a; 4 50; VM II 19; T I 255; EP II 305

A beauty on the scene attends, A30 41; T I 368; MP II 48

A Beggar turnd up to a noblemans dwelling, EP I 379

A blossom won my wandering eye, A5 39; A40 43a; B2 252a; C2 43; 4 35; EP II 328; JCSJ 4 36

A brisk young shepherd courted me, FT 109

A charm appears in every land, A37 14; A40 199; RM 90; L 596

A charm is thrown oer Olney plains, 19 46; LPJC 116; LP 187

A cloud is cast about me & the spell, A50 R41; A54 190; B5 81; MC 204; MP III 461

A dew drop on a rose leaf, LP 238

A drabble tail a trample--a empty coddle cap, A53 44; MP II 249

A dull gloom hangs above the peaceful fields, 20 I 103; T II 410; PJCM 134; JR 113; LP 385

A faith in God will never lead astray (stray couplet), MP II 243

A faithless shepherd courted me, A430 53a; B4 33; 18 7; PCFM 54; T II 153; GG 152; X 204; FT 106; MP IV 369

A false knight wooed a maiden poor, A41 3; B7 88; 18 22; Ch 340; T II 164; FT 172; MP IV 546

A few more storms will soon be oer (fragment), A18 76; A50 R48

A few the lonely [ ] stray (fragment), B9 57

A fly with wings of green and scarlet spot, 29 13

'A foolish trifle often makes a cure', A16 16; A40 43; B2 223a; EP II 251

A gracile beauty tender as a flower (stray line), MP II 337

A grasshopper idle the whole summer long, A30 77; A31 62; A54 45; B8 R100; RM 86; MC 47; VFHC; MP III 119

A housed up mouse both night & morn, 3 163; A40 45a; A54 308; MC 343; MP IV 81

A hugh old tree all wasted to a shell, A61 86; OA 269; NS 91

& it so happened on a morn in may (stray line), MP II 332

A Lab'rour journeying to his work betimes, C1 7a; 1 98; EP I 137

A lady loved [or 'loves'] a squire's son, A40 97; B7 31 etc; FT 155; MP IV 447

A lady too was lost this very night (fragment), A4 14; A51 69

A Little Lane, the brook runs close beside, D26; 28; T II 425; PJCM 224; JR 118; GG 234; TSP 343; LP 1105

A little slender bird of reddish brown, A54 417; A57 33; T II 244; TSP 216; BP 98; MC 469; OA 235; JCB 53; MP IV 321

A long acquaintance makes a friend, A59 55; Turnbull Library Misc MS 275 (ClJ 1); L 637

A maid was wooed by a haughty swain & she was fair & gay, A40 87; A54 310; B4 24; MC 347; MP IV 86

A maiden by a thorn reclined, A40 99; B7 35; FT 170; MP IV 459

A maiden head the virgins trouble, C2 36; 1 22; 4 20; OA 18; EP I 38

[A maiden sat beneath a thorn: see A maiden by a thorn reclined]

A maiden shuns the sultry day, A3 85; A40 31a; B1 139; 5 69; EP I 38

A man may mourn a man may sigh, 20 I 250; LP 524; K 55

A man may stand and spit across the brook, A61 34

A merry waste of happy sights & sounds, B8 93; MP II 291

A Miller lives a cante cheel, A3 104; 1 214; EP I 298

A Mushroom its Goodness but Shortly Endures, A4 16; B1 156; 1 108; EP I 155

A new years welcome lovely maid, A21 R76; A40 39; A54 200; B4 R62; MC 214; MP III 476

A night without a morning, C3 60 etc; 20 II 33, 97; T II 519; PJCM 174; TSP 317; X 210; LP 698

A page that Time now covers with his hand, 17 151; MP II 322

A passing bell wakes not a deeper sigh (fragment), A42 104

A Path old tree goes by thee crooking on, A54 382; B8 35; AS 121; T II 144; X 80; MC 431; MP IV 257

A pleasant path a little path, A50 R59; EP I 541

A public name's the shuttlecock of fame (fragment), B9 R18

A pulse scarce beats between the fickle reign (fragment), A31 11; A39 28; A42 103; A50 R56; B9 R30

A quiet comes across the mind, A57 4

A rainbow paints yon deep blue cloud, A22 R15; EP II 531

A ramble by the rivers side, C4 387; 20 II 446; LP 1095

A rosey bud I would not kill, 20 I 153; LP 440

A scolding woman's worse than hell, A4 8; A40 36; B1 118; 1 176; 5 147; AW 52; EP I 245

A seaboy on the giddy mast, 20 I 36a, 51; PJCM 112; GG 211; X 210; OA 347; LP 327; W 191; E 92

A secret sorrow oft betrays its home (fragment), A42 104; B9 R22

A sigh from the repentant heart, 17 143; MP II 320

A shadow moving by one's side, A30 14; B8 R40; 32 62, 69; SCVS 219; AS 73; T I 411; L 238, 240; MP I 338

A shelter from the storm & from the wind, NS 92

A Shepherd from the mountain braes, LP 259

A skip jack knave laced up (stray phrase), MP II 333

A spirit speaks in every wind (fragment), A31 87

A splendid sun has set when shall our eyes, A31 5; A40 137; A54 344; T II 105; GG 151; TSP 192; X 207; RM 109; MC 389; MP IV 158

A stranger meets a many folks and knows, T II 362

a thousand fall / As fresh as health ful as a morning sun (fragment), MP II 336

A tinker on his stoney seat, B2 242a; B4 R90; EP II 302

A Tramper on a certain day, A3 41; B1 101; 1 180; 5 81; EP I 251

A voice from the ocean, A39 49; A40 116a; B4 21; MP IV 478

A Uglier mortal ne'er has been, EP I 154

A weedling wild on lonly lea, B2 146a; VM I 96; NG 42; T I 249; EP II 84

A whimpering brook beside the path, C3 381; 20 II 192; LPJC 233; LP 856

A wish will rise in every breast, B1 44; D4 13; PD 83; T I 58; EP I 489

A Witch or wizard g-d knows what, 5 175; LM (Jan 1820) 11; EP I 498

A young knight did love a lady fair, FT 153; MP IV 450

Abodements desolate mans mind disturbs (fragment), A50 R45; MP II 224

About the bridges where the loose stones lie (fragment), A57 9

About thee and of thee and nothing but thee, C3 365; 20 II 184; LP 848

Above the bruik the midges play, C4 359; 20 II 429; PJCM 221; LPJC 276; LP 1078

Above the russet clods the corn is seen (The Skylark), X 93

Absorbing time that all things overwhelms, A61 27; T II 358; NS 59

Accept dear maid now summer glows, 20 I 79; PJCM 117; X 173; LP 359

Accross the fallow clods at early morn, A40 179; A46 185; A54 197; T II 244; JR 75; SPP 82; BP 61; CC 12; MC 211; GS 106; MP III 472

Accross the hills & holes the journey lay, B9 83; NS 39

Across the level meadow's pleasant way (fragment), D17

Adelaide, Adelaide why art thou sleeping, 20 I 178; LP 467

Adelaide beautiful Adelaide see, 20 I 301; LP 573

Adieu! my love adieu!, C4 167; 20 II 314; Ch 172; AS 169; T II 511; TSP 325; LP 973

Adieu to [the] green meadows To the wild flowers blooming fair, C3 323; 20 II 165; LP 830

Again freckld cowslips beguildeth the plain, A5 54; B2 209; C2 53; 4 56; VM I 140; T I 92; EP II 215

[Again I'll take my idle pen: see Agen I'll take my idle pen]

Again the robin waxes tame, SPP 89; CC 31

Age yellows my leaf with a daily decline, A10 4a; B2 276A; 22 5; VM I 170; EP II 390; FT 145

Agen I'll take my idle pen And sing my bonny mountain maid, C3 223; 20 II 115; Ch 142; LP 779

Agen the homestead hedge with brambles green (fragment), A57 12; JCB 84

Ah, adieu to the scene pastorallity yields, A4 22; B1 70; D3 1; D4 2; EP I 472

Ah, bitter love, the lorn heart when it's broke, B3 103

Ah, could I feel my spirits beat, B6 153

Ah cruel death to Friendship such a foe, C2 67; 1 8; 4 115; EP I 119

Ah, dearest, could both of us make but one mind, A59 68; B6 109

Ah doubtful bard perhaps in vain, B1 54; EP I 522

Ah eve lov'd bird how sweet thy music floats, EP I 456

Ah faithless love I've met thy scorning, A40 45; A54 305; 3 155; MC 338; MP IV 73

Ah happy spot how still it seems, A40 65; A54 83; B3 8; B7 73; NG 112; T II 185; RM 46; MC 89; PM 107; MP III 216

Ah just as well as if but yesternight, A5 3; T I 74

Ah little did I think in time thats past, B2 122; VM I 65; NG 39; T I 228; EP II 34

Ah lovley flower round thee the storm is brewing, EP II 399

Ah powerful night were but thy chances mine, A5 31; GG 118

Ah smiling cherub cheating hope adieu, A3 107; B1 R172; 5 125; PD 141; T I 120; EP I 416

Ah sure it is a lovely day, A23 R41; A29 8 etc; A30 118; MC 153; GS 33; MP III 350

'Ah thank god for this twill go down when digested', EP II 403

Ah thou poor neglected hound, A3 71; B1 122; 1 136; 5 138; PD 27; T I 21; EP I 202

Ah when I sit with [ ] days (fragment), A59 42

Ah when this world & I have shaken hands, B2 132 VM II 171; T I 226; EP II 54

Ah when we look on pleasant things, A50 R40; MP II 216

'Ah where can he linger' said Doll wi a sigh, A5 62; B2 262; VM I 153; T I 104; EP II 353

Ah, who can pass by it and notice it never, 3 153

Ah woodbine shade the very sight of thee, C2 66a; 1 87; 4 114; EP I 118

Ah youth's sweet joys! Why are ye gone astray?, B1 48; PD 103; T I 83; EP I 518

Alas there's no retreating, 20 I 131; LP 417

Alas what a pity, the maid of the city, A10 14; 22 7; EP II 441

All are employed ones gone to seek the tup, A61 99; T II 368; NS 95

All glory to my God and King And to his place above, C3 196; 20 II 101; LP 765

All how silent and how still, A3 89; B1 143; 5 7; PD 50; AS 10; NG 14; T I 14; GG 37; JR 1; X 76; SPP 3; CC 6; OA 24; W 33; EP I 404; CK 36; B 13

All in the month of August, some fifty years ago, B4 23

All nature breaths of joy & hails the may, 17 8; MaC 20; T II 118; MP II 299

All nature has a feeling wood fields brooks, 19 124; T II 475; LC 67; LP 210

All nature owns in glory, A20 4; A41 54; A54 169; MC 180; MP III 419

All nature owns with one accord, A18 87; A39 R12; A40 105A; A54 70; B4 R54; T II 83; TSP 191; X 48; RM 68; MC 74; MP III 180

All that the pasture, hill, or valley yields, C4 383; 20 II 444; T II 422; LP 1093

Almighty creator and ruler as well, 20 I 291; LP 563; V 177

Almighty mystery --hou whose power & might, A40 58a; L 251; EP II 605

Almighty, omnipotent--dweller on high, 20 I 269; LP 542

Along the meadow banks I rove [from 'Child Harold'], X 15

Along the pleasant banks of Nene, 20 I 140; LP 426

Along the road as goes the tale, A4 15; A40 36a; B1 155; 1 76; 5 79; EP I 105

Along the willow banks of Nen, C4 279; 20 II 381; LPJC 271; LP 1034

Although I am in prison, 20 1 42; Ch 232; T II 433; BP 131; LP 315

Amazing grand eternity of time, T II 114; GG 151; X 199

Ambition what a pomp creating word, A31 12; A40 80a; A51 34; A54 387; MC 436; MP IV 268

Amelia thou maid of my bosom come hither, C3 319; 20 II 163; LP 828

Amidst the happiest joy a shade of grief, A37 53; A54 379; AS 89; T II 111; RM 131; MC 428; GS 178; MP IV 251

Among the green bushes the songs of the thrushes, 20 I 157; Ch 244; T II 486; LP 446

Among the green bushes where primroses bloom, C3 9; 20 II 5; LPJC 197; LP 669

[Among the heath furze still delights to dwell: see Nature now spreads around in dreary hue]

Among the many images of may, A37 49; MP II 115

Among the meadow hay cocks, 20 I 11; TSP 293; OA 339; LP 281

Among the meadow swamps in clumps of gold, A33 R2; MP II 107

Among the orchard weeds from every search, A61 79; T II 367; BP 122; NS 86; E 44

Among the pebbles of the meadow streams, A18 R18; MP II 6

Among the stubbles when the fields go grey, A54 421; B6 32; MC 474; OA 232; MP IV 327

Among the taller wood with ivy hung, B9 69; T II 335; JR 94; LC 53; WS 95; TSP 232; CC 64; OA 248; W 164; NS 30

Among the tawny tasselled reed, WS 69

An honest heart ads to the highest fame (stray couplet), MP II 335

An imperfection as perfections guest, A48 29; A51 111; A54 394; T II 107; RM 127; MC 443; JCSJ 3 34; MP IV 281

An ocean almost boundless as the mind (fragment), A57 9; T II 301

An old man like a hermit plainly dight, 17 151; MP II 233

An old tray leans agen a bush the eye, A61 58; NS 75

An uglier mortal ne'er has been, 1 107

& [ ] winding ways break, EP I 371

And all is joyous music save that noise (fragment), A58 18

And art thou doomed as one of those, C4 291; 20 II 389; LP 1041

& as if lost unable to go back, A50 R50; MP II 228

& better places where they wait, NS 50

& brooks bright waters that in music creep, EP II 522

& come to my bosom my only thought pleasure, 3 162; EP II 112

& every morning passing gives a call, A61 130; NS 111

& god be wi ye neighbour sherry, B2 136; EP II 64

And had a great wall shining spacious and high, Bod. MS. Don.a.8. ff. 4, 3v, 3 (ClJ 11)

And has the springs all glorious eye, 20 I 45; Ch 229; AS 150; NG 150; T II 433; JR 121; X 114; LP 317; K 56

& heaths sprinkled thick with frye (stray line), MP II 272

& he showed me a river in midst of the street, 6 34; LP 156; C 85

[And he would trace the stagnant pond or lake: see While learned genius rush to bold extreemes]

& here I behold thee a young pliant tree, EP I 363

& here we meet in merry Q, 3 154; EP II 98

& I do in the eve delight, A10 13a; EP II 440

& I looked & I saw a new heaven, 6 32; LP 151; C 79

And I saw when the Lamb opened one of the seals, 19 11

& if friendship [ ] you would win it, EP I 378

& in the maple bush there hides the style, 19 1; LPJC 97; LP 161; GS 282

And in the old pond waters spread below (fragment), B5 75

And is she now fallen, 20 I 361; LP 628

And is Spring come again to cheer, 20 I 104; LP 386

& Ive got a secret I fear to tell thee, A10 9a; EP II 432

& Ive told ye hold up yer head my boy robin, 3 157; EP II 103

& let pity find an odd penny good neeghbours, A10 15; EP II 443

And left free to every whim (fragment), 32 31, 45; L 111,159

& looked about & started more to find, OA 265; NS 63

& love runs oer a pleasant bed, 3 159; EP II 107

& makes our hearts brim oer (stray couplet) MP II 30

& mark the flowers around us how to [or 'they'] live, RM 146; MC 424; MP IV 244

& mark the jerking [or nimble] swallow jerk & fling, A54 406; A57 R98; T II 326; MC 456; MP IV 305

& mint & flag leaf swording high (fragment), 32 89; L 366

& morning woke upon her healthy cheek, 360 f.flyleaf; LP 263

And must we part that once so close, C3 359; 20 II 181; PJCM 195; LPJC 229; LP 845; GS 346

And o'er the pleachy stubs of mellow brown, B5 98

And oft observed as (her while) in discoursing deep (fragment), 1 20; 7 43

And often from the rustling sound, OA 237

& once agen thou lovly spring, SCVS 200; NG 76; T I 348; MP I 318

[And only o'er the heaths to ramble: see Lonely oer the heaths...]

& ralph ye have leard a fine language to woo me, B4 R96; 3 156; EP II 102

And see the flowers about us, how they live, A40 118; A54 375; 17 107

& shall they dare to boast their deeds, 17 152; MP II 323

& smooth voicd cuckoo singing as she flyes, EP II 522

And such art thou, brave patriot good and just (fragment), B7 74

And the old dame, tho' not in laughing mood (fragment), D14 13

And then he roams the woodlands (fragment), A58 11

& theres a bird I often mind, A46 156; A47 16; BN 57; MP II 174

And tho thou seemst a weedling wild, A4 17; B1 140; 1 151; 5 67; PD 45; T I 84; EP I 216

And thou vain man in wisdom's eye may seem (fragment), Yale Osborn Collection (ClJ 12); YULG 31 (1956) 35

& thourt like the flower & the summer (fragment), MP II 352

& We have been so very blest, 22 6; EP I 516

& what is Life?--an hour glass on the run, A3 69; B1 121; 5 128; PD 25; NG 1; PCFM 60; T I 55; LC 18; SPP 6; X 197; OA 26; EP I 392; B 16

And what is Love the sweetest of all pains, 19 117, 104; LP 213

& when Balaam saw that it pleased the Lord well, 6 21; 8 29 etc; LP 106; C 29

& when I'm weary of my care, 3 153; EP II 97

And when the knocker at the evening drops (fragment), B6 83

And when we've ta'en a pleasant rest, B6 163

And wheres there a scene more delightfully seeming, B4 R103; 3 159; OA 47; EP II 108

And will she leave the lowly clowns, C3 289; 20 II 147; T II 456; LP 811

And will ye gang Mary and never more see me, C4 223; 20 II 349; LP 1006

And will you ever love me dearest Yes by the heavens above thee, C3 149; 20 II 80; PJCM 178; LPJC 206; LP 740

And yonder by the circling stack, OA 241

Angling has pleasures that are much enjoyed, A54 428; B6 61; SPP 106; MC 482; OA 196; MP IV 337

Anticipation is fulfilled, B4 94

Antiquity thou dark sublime, A22 10; A23 R33; A31 77; 23; LM (Apr 1823) 380; SCVS 228; T I 412; MP I 347

Approaching night to dusky shadows grows, B6 22; T II 64

Arise, my Isabel, arise, C4 79; 20 II 267; Ch 154; LPJC 253; LP 924

Armd at all points with stubborn leathern dress, A31 28; 17 110; MP II 315

Around the old & ruined wall, A46 144; A47 12; T II 234; BP 79; MP II 172

Art thou a man, thou tyrant o'er distress? (fragment from 'The Parish'), 32 64; L 254; PA 81

As all of this worlds kindred are born to fade away (stray line), MP II 333

As bold Hood he was marching along, B4 45; FT 132; MP II 259

As boys were playing in their schools dislike, B9 50; T II 343; BP 120; JCB 94; OA 270; W 156; NS 19

As fearless as a cherubs rest, A39 25; A54 113; T II 92; RM 54; MC 121; MP III 285

As hopes fair sun breaks fates desponding gloom, EP I 541

As I wanderd oer the Irish hills, A25 R27; EP II 589

As I was walking out one Day, EP I 514

As lingers winter oer the forward spring, A15 R9; EP II 495

As night finds many eyes in twinkling stars, B9 R24; 17 70; MP II 308

As oer the gay pasture went rocking a clown, B1 29; PD 78; EP I 347

As pale as Ashes & as cold as clay (stray line), MP II 336

As pleasant as unlooked for summer showers, A54 403; A57 R109; MC 453; MP IV 300

As simmer to the mountain, C4 311; 20 II 400; LP 1052

As stubborn as the oak that cannot bend, A61 54

As the old Proverb always proves true in the end, A4 16; B1 156; 1 247; EP I 343

As three maidens played at ball, B7 34; FT 186; MP II 280

As under Sherwood's snubbed oaks, A40 91a; FT 164; MP IV 422

As you go by Newcastle wall (fragment), B3 R75

Aslant the cottage ridge the sun, 1 173; EP I 242

At closing day and early morn, 20 I 279; LP 552

At darkling, when the winter's suns (fragment), A59 87

At days mid hour when weary labour stops, A9 8a; EP II 630

At eve, lov'd bird, how sweet thy music floats, A5 49

[At evens hour the truce of toil tis sweet: see The sun now sinks behind th woodland green]

At Helpston town O rariety, A6 18; EP I 457

Auld Scotland's woods auld Scotland's braes, 20 I 138; LP 423

Aurora now right earlily in dew, A39 33

Autumn comes laden with her ripened load, A18 69;A41 36; B9 R24; T I 525; OA 131; MP II 140

Autumn hath shed a many times, A18 R221; MP II 12

Autumn I love thy latter end [or 'parting look'] to view, A8 R28; B2 256; VM II 193; T I 276; JR 18; OA 44; W 64; EP II 337

Autumn is beautiful to see, EP II 544

Ave Maria! woman mild, 20 I 101; LP 383

Awake thou sluggard could thy drowzy soul, B1 60; T I 77; EP I 525

Away wi cares and ither waurk, C4 273; 20 II 378; LP 1031

Away wi the puling of asses, A9 14a; EP II 406

Away with your lands o' the orange & myrtle, C4 363; 20 II 432; LP 1081

Away with your songs and your glasses, B4 48; MP IV 77

Away, ye cold opinions and distains, A41 10; MP II 131

Aye almost scripture truths my poorer mind, A40 182; A51 73; A54 368; B5 73; T II 139; RM 142; MC 417; MP IV 231

Aye aye thou faemed inglorious mettle, 17 172; MP II 327

Ay, hopes and fears hath many lines, A57 50; D18 8

Aye--little Larkie whats the reason, A3 30; B1 94; 1 73; 5 101; PD 8; T I 25; BP 23; EP I 99

Aye lowland bard & canst thou whistle, A40 48; B2 250a; EP II 323

Ay, once again, thou bird of many shores, B6 43

[Ay, rural rhymes, canst thou whistle: see Aye lowland bard]

Aye theres a wholsome feeling out of doors, A54 403; A57 R109; T II 329; MC 453; MP IV 301

Aye when long summer showers lets labour win, A54 424; B6 51; MC 478; MP IV 331

 

 

Bacon unveil'd philosophy, A3 109; 1 94; EP I 130

Bad names upon the wings of every wind (stray couplet), MP II 332

Bard of the mossy cot, C3 61; 20 II 32; PJCM 171; GG 225; LP 696; E 104

Bards doat upon epics in numbers to suit, A40 162; A43 R105

Barn door fowls have gone to bed, 20 I 211; T II 419; PJCM 148; LP 493

Battle now is drawing near, 1 217; EP I 301

Be where I may when death brings in his bill, B2 120a; VM II 169; T I 265; EP II 31

Beautiful gravel walks overgrown, LP 174

Beautiful mortals of the glowing earth, 20 I 81; OA 353; LP 361; PM 65

Beautifull poetry I bow to thee, 19 29; LP 174

Beautifull Sorrow in thy silence thou, 19 53; T II 464; PJCM 142; LPJC 120; LP 191

Beautiful woman, visions dwell, LP 10

Beauty, exulting, placed its motto there (fragment), A42 104

Beauty how changhing and how frail, A3 139; B1 9; 1 35; PD 70; T I 78; LC 22; EP I 59

Beauty is nothing but the power, B7 67; T II 271; MP II 285

Behind the distant spire the sun, A54 264; MC 286; MP III 575

Behind the far woods lowly sunk was the sun, 1 24; EP I 39

Behold yon Cottage on the green, C2 71a; 1 111; 4 125; EP I 172

Being refreshed with thoughts of wandering moods, A54 420; A57 26; MC 461; MP IV 311

Beneath a meadow brig whose arch was dry, A18 145 etc; A20 R26; A31 R205; SCVS 146; T I 471; CT 98; MP I 214

Beneath a shed, a blackthorn holt behind (fragment), A19 23

Beneath a sheltering covert's shade, 1 138, 222; EP I 204

Beneath a sheltering woods warm side, A3 34; B1 R168; 5 31; PD 11; T I 7

Beneath my feet the very dust, A18 49; A41 57; A54 171; MaC 87; T I 416; MC 182; MP III 423

Beneath thies hedge how happy have I felt, 13 inside bc; EP I 515

Beneath this sod where smiling creeps (peeps), A3 139; B1 10; 1 61; 5 130; PD 71; NG 22; T I 78

Beside a lonely sheltering wood, 1 200 etc.

Beside a mole-hill, thickly topt, A46 135; A47 7; T II 231; BP 74

Beside a runnel build my shed, B2 134; AS 46; VM I 83; T I 232; WS 52; TSP 59; OA 27; W 53; EP II 60; JCSC 36

Beside the fire large apples lay to roast (fragment), A42 105

Beside the little fire at night, A54 244; MC 261; MP III 547

Beside the path the wheat was high (fragment), D15 2

Bessey--I call thee by that earthly name, A28 9; A40 69a; 32 54; LM (Aug 1821) 128; T I 516; L 195; EP II 598

Bessey wi the inky hair Snow drops are not half so fair, C3 277; 20 II 142; LP 806

Besseys the top wench that walks on a sunday, A40 45; B2 203; EP II 204

Between the lapses of the coming storm (stray line) MP II 14

Beyond expression delicately fine, B2 247

Bird o' the wilderness, C3 433; 20 II 222; LP 879 [untraced 'ghost': in LP index, not in text]

Bird of the morn, D21; 20 I 37; Ch 137; T II 440; PJCM 114; GG 211; X 93; BP 125; OA 344; LP 309

Birds sing and build and nature scorns alone: see The birds they sing & build & nature scorns

Black absence hides upon the past, 20 I 22; T II 509; PJCM 129; TSP 295; X 173; LP 293; V 166; GS 276; K 59

Black grows the southern clouds [or sky] betokening rain, A40 40; A54 385; B4 63; AS 86; T I 517; JR 35; WS 30; LPL 3; RM 122; MC 433; OA 102; MP IV 262

Black mellancholy like an illness comes, A57 77; B6 28; Pfz Misc 198; MP IV 583

Blackbirds loud minstrels of the summer shower, A53 23; A50 R38; MP II 248

Blake though insulted by a kings decree, A37 41; A54 397; MC 446; MP IV 289

Bless thy old-fashioned copper face, 17 178; MP II 328

Bless't is the man with mind erect, 20 I 207; PJCM 149; X 209; LP 490

Blow on ye winds till yer breath it is broken, A10 9a; EP II 432

Bluebells how beautifull & bright they look, 19 35; LP 179

Bold Robin rose by break of day, B7 9

Bonny & stout & brown without a hat, A61 72; T II 345; EF 116; NS 81

Bonny hills and bosky braes, 20 I 255; LP 529

Bonny Lassie dinna leave me, C4 327; 20 II 410; LP 1061

Bonny Mary let us go O'er the hills of gorse and heather, C3 379; 20 II 191; LPJC 232; LP 855

Bonny young Susan lives down the green lane, C4 109; 20 II 284; PJCM 207; LP 942

Book making now is fashions busiest game (stray couplet), MP II 333

Bowing adorers of the gale, Ch 268

Boys, bring the booty from the cave, A40 84; B4 R57; B9 R48; FT 138; MP IV 395

Boys draw about the village now, A18 206; MP II 11

Britannia cease--For Nelsons doom, C2 66a; 1 33; 4 82; EP I 54

Brooding beside the crackling fire at night A23 12; A40 39a etc; B4 R60 etc.

Brown butterflies in happy quiet rest, A54 416; A57 32; MC 469; MP IV 320

Burried in depths of an extensive wood, A38 1; B6 R209; MP II 118

Bushes and trees the spirits of nature haunt ye and are glad, 20 I 125; LP 411

But little lingerers old esteem detains, A54 422; B6 32; T II 241; BP 93; MC 475; OA 209; MP IV 328

But love in anger quickly cools again (fragment), A48 19

But nature is but as a < > (fragment), MP II 295

But the dear ties which love and nature binds, 1 89

But they who hunt the fields for rotten meat, B9 68; CC 2; OA 248; W 163; NS 30; E 53

By A Cottage Near A Wood, 27; PJCM 53; LP 3

By all those token flowers that spring, 20 I 4; LP 273

By Babel's streams we sat and sighed, A40 110a; B4 R81; 33 9; L 431; MP IV 476

By lonesom Woods & Unfrequented Streams, 1 155; EP I 219

By mud pools see a gnat striped [or 'stupid'] nameless flye, TSP 334; LP 859

By spring's warm winds and gleaming smiles awoke (fragment), A21 15a

By the Moon and Star light in, C3 367; 20 II 185; TSP 330; LP 849

By the old tavern door on the causeway there lay, A54 325; B8 81; T II 22; SPP 46; MC 364; MP IV 123

By the spring that shines so clear, LP 242

By the wood-hedge primroses are peeping, 20 I 109; LP 392

By twittering swallows we perceive, EP II 545

 

 

Calm resignation meets a happy end, B2 124a; VM I 68; T I 229; EP II 39

Can I forget those large blue eyes That lightens on me yet, C3 171; 20 II 90; LP 752

Can ye love lowland lassie the Tweed and the Forth, C4 193; 20 II 329; LP 988

Can you love my dear lassie the hills o' wild thyme, C3 373; 20 II 188; LP 852

[Canot thou draw out Leveathan: see Canst thou [draw out Leviathan] with hooks Leviathan draw out]

Canst thou buy my love so lightly, EP I 373

Canst thou [draw out Leviathan] with hooks Leviathan draw out, A62 1; 6 54; LP 128; C 111 & 115

Cares feed on solitude as worms in May (fragment), A42 103

Cats creep down the orchard right early to watch (fragment), D18 4

Cease, Lucy, those affected ways, A40 83; B9 4; MP IV 391

[Centinels proclaim the morning: see Sentinels proclaim...]

Checkt autumn doubly sweet is thy declining, B2 248a; VM II 157; T I 129; EP II 318

Cheerful content thy home be mine, A40 101; A54 176; AS 131; T II 96; MC 187; MP III 431

Childhood meets joys so easy every where, B2 135; EP II 61

Children-like insects dancing in the sun, T II 309

Christmass is come and every hearth, A18 R216; A29 R99; A31 37; SPP 139; SC (December); MP I 156; E 3

Click clock a clay, MP II 312

Close by a lonely place that seems so lone, A61 104; NS 97

Close by the old pond stands the double tree, B9 86; NS 41

Close by the road the traveller set his cart, A61 83; T II 352; NS 89

Close up the windows & shut out the night; MP II 305

Close where the milking maidens pass, B9 72; T II 342; BP 121; JCB 29; OA 273; W 158; NS 32

Closly confind among humdrumming wheels, A5 5; EP I 443

Clouds rack and drive before the wind, A59 R78; T II 299

Clouds on the harvests glory rise (stray couplet), MP II 311

Cock Robin he got a neat [or 'new'] tippet at spring, C3 175; 20 II 93; T II 446; WS 65; PJCM 179; TSP 313; X 102; BP 136; CC 68; OA 403; LP 755

Cocks wake the early morn wi' many a Crow, A3 129; B1 6; 5 26; 7 41; PD 67; NG 18; T I 56; SPP 7; OA 12; W 36; EP I 434; B 10

[Cold stone-pits all with ivy overhung: see Old stone pits]

Come all you seamen bold lend an ear lend an ear, B7 20; MP IV 95

Come all you seamen bold who have fought side to side [several variants], A40 94; A54 312; B4 43; B7 20; MC 349; FT 124 6; MP IV 90

Come along my good fellow, 20 I 132; TSP 302; LP 418

Come away come away to the wild wood, C3 47; 20 II 25; LP 689

Come away to the vale now it shines in moonlight (stray couplet), MP II 128

Come beautiful maiden while autumn delays, 20 I 127; LP 412

Come bleak november in thy wildness come, A31 172; LM (Nov 1822) 403; SCVS 221; T I 353; MP I 340

Come come brave seamen all who have fought who have won, B4 43; MP IV 94

Come come my boy [or 'son'] Robin be wise lad & value, A40 93; A54 273; B3 38; MC 298; L 507; MP IV 5

Come come my love the bush is growing, A59 34; B6 167; T II 269; GG 165; TSP 225

Come come my old crones & gay fellows, A40 54a; A54 306; AS 102; MC 339; MP IV 75

Come come with me, A51 R101; MP II 246

Come darling summer wi thy many charms, B2 125a; EP II 41

Come down & sit in dust, 6 58; LP 140; C 131

Come dwell with me, 19 71; LPJC 128; LP 202

Come early morning with thy mealy grey, A54 405; A57 R99; T II 325; SPP 152; MC 456; GS 31; MP IV 304

Come Eliza & Anna lay bye top & ball, A18 89; A30 100; A41 R88; A54 157; B6 R186; B9 R44; 9 5; MC 168; MP III 397

Come flattering hope now woes distress me, A52 2; B1 39; PD 80; EP I 531

Come gentle spring and show thy varied greens, 20 I 343; Ch 201; T II 401; PJCM 159; LP 610

Come give us the health to the dearest on earth, A29 2; A54 283; MC 312; MP IV 30

Come hither lady fair, our queen thou shalt be (fragment), A36 13

Come hither my fair [or 'dear'] one my choice one & rare one, C3 13; 20 II 7; Ch 136; AS 155; T II 480; PJCM 163; TSP 316; LP 672

Come hither ye who thirst, 20 I 142; MaC 93; T II 473; PJCM 120; GG 213; TSP 285; X 105; LP 428

Come in the morning the sunrises clear, C4 231; 20 II 353; LP 1010

Come in thou poor and weary mind, A57 22

Come, lay by your books and away to your play, A30 177

Come, let us sit down on this baulk of mown hay, A31 R158

Come love and walk, C4 317; 20 II 404; LP 1055

Come lovley Jenny haste away, A6 40; EP I 461

Come lovely Lucy lets away, C2 58; 4 66; EP I 494

Come Lubin let us leave this maple tree, A6 22; EP I 459

Come luscious spring come with thy mossy roots, A37 34; A54 233; B8 R124; T II 59; SPP 91; BP 33; MC 250; OA 223; GS 152; MP III 532

Come, maiden, dear maiden, a beautiful troop, A59 38

Come maiden sad--of sorrows and of sighs, C4 75; 20 II 265; PJCM 205; GG 231; LP 923

Come muse brush up to try thy skill, B1 29; EP I 547

Come my beloved, A46 R158; MP II 159

Come my love the summers day, C4 353; 20 II 425; LP 1075

Come Nannie [dear] lie near me Thy talk it will cheer me, C3 167; 20 II 88; LP 750

Come pensive autumn with thy clouds & storms, A15 R8; 32 31; VM II 208; AS 44; T I 283; L 111; EP II 494

Come, prime your guns, your belt throw on, A40 55a; B4 R80; MP IV 378

Come push round the glass tis a god in disguise, A40 88; A54 299; B7 2; MC 331; MP IV 61

Come queen of months in company, A18 196 etc; A20 R36; SCVS 42; T I 311; TSP 82; SC (May); JCSC 17; MP I 58

Come rural muse thou idol joy, A31 152; MP II 99

Come sit wi the birdies thou bonny young maiden, C4 277; 20 II 380; LP 1033

Come softly my darling My love quickly come, C3 281; 20 II 144; PJCM 185; LP 808

'Come suke begin to blow the fire', C1 2; 1 121; EP I 186

Come we to the Summer, to the Summer we will come, 20 I 352; T II 507; PJCM 161; LP 619

Come weal come woe I care not, 20 I 345; TSP 327; LP 612

Companion of my [cheated] checkered life, B4 R85; MP II 265

Compassion sighs and feels and weeps, PD 72; T I 79

Confusions plenty lies in every way, A61 63; T II 365; NS 77

Content, thy home be mine, A18 R268

Cool in the brook did stand the plashing cows, A50 R75; EP I 369

Could I retrace the pleasures of my years, LP 238

Could I see all the world like the flight of a bird (fragment), B6 177

Cowper the Poet of the field, C3 411; 20 II 209; T II 423; LC 62; TSP 308; OA 409; LP 871; W 196

Cowslip bud so early peeping, B2 130a VM I 82; T I 244; EP II 51

Coy Maidens o' Drysail bonny Girls o' Buckhiven, C3 353; 20 II 178; LP 843

Crafty cats now sit to watch, I 95

Crafty cats that were constantly fixt on the watch, EP I 354

Creative genius owns an art, 309

Crimson with haws the whitethorn bends (fragment), A62 R11

Critics, 'tis vain to urge your spite, 30 58

Crowded with ivy in a favoured nook, A61 7; NS 54

Crows crowd croaking overhead WS 44

 

 

Dark creeping Ivy with thy berries brown, 32 29; VM II 165; T I 263; JR 16; CC 37; L 100; EP II 597; PM 97

Dark was the night, in woeful plight, C2 6a; 1 93; 4 118; EP I 127

Darkness came oer like chaos--& the sun, A50 R44; A54 366; T II 138; RM 141; MC 415; GS 57; MP IV 226

Darkness is chidden at her smiles or charmed (fragment), A42 104

Darkness like midnight from the sobbing woods, A54 433; T II 314; SPP 157; MC 489; GS 48; PR 80; MP IV 347

Daughter of pastoral smells and sights, A18 13 etc; A20 R15; SC (July); CK 79; MP I 84

Daughters of england where has nature given, A40 70a; A54 352; MC 398; L 216; MP IV 184

Day breaks betimes & wears nights shadows thin (stray deleted couplet) MP II 30

Day burnishes the distant hills, A36 3 etc; A40 75a; A54 71; T I 429; RM 69; MC 75; OA 109; MP III 183

Dead lies poor Collin murder'd by a frown, C1 13a; 1 36; 4 87; EP I 60; K 5

Dear Anna the sweetest The world ever saw, C3 325; 20 II 166; LP 830

Dear blooming wild your shades and all, C2 28; 1 11; 4 3; EP I 20

Dear brother Robin, this comes from us all, A59 61; T II 277; JR 82; TSP 227

Dear Harry excuse me this whimsical letter, A31 30; MP II 91

Dear heart, I love to see the quiet spring, T II 63

Dear, how I love to see the quiet spring, A50 12

Dear Julia! now the new mown hay, C4 61; 20 II 256; LPJC 250; LP 913

Dear Kate Since I no longer can, C1 13a; 1 38; 4 88; EP I 64

Dear native spot though nought to thee is given, A48 27; EP II 516

Dear Phebe I love thee and that on for ever, C3 59; C4 5; 20 II 31; 231; LP 695

Dearest Mary, ever dearest!, C4 57; 20 II 254; LPJC 248; LP 911

Death levels all, and wealth and pride, 1 243

Death's memories are graves, 20 I 105; T II 468; LP 388

Deaths rude abruptions often comes to part, A50 R38; A51 116; MP II 215

Deckt out in ribbons gay & papers cut, A61 85; T II 368; LC 55; OA 269; NS 91

Deem not, sweet maid, my passion bold, A40 55; B7 12; MP IV 374

Delicious is a leisure hour, A54 250; A57 17; B6 1; MC 269; OA 200; GS 149; MP III 555

Delightful flower tis seldom mine, A54 234; A57 R20; MC 253; MP III 537

Delightful weather for all sorts of moods, A54 425; B6 53; T II 321; JR 91; MC 479; MP IV 333

Departed shade of lofty birth, A40 64; A54 127; B7 26; MC 136; MP III 315

Despis'd, unskill'd or how I Will, B1 40; PD 81; T I 82; JR 6; TSP 22; EP I 545

Dewint I would not flatter nor would I, A18 84; A41 38; A54 356; T I 521; TSP 137; RM 119; MC 404; MP IV 198

Did I know where to meet thee, 6 15; 7 47; OA 295; LPJC 54; LP 60; C 72

Did you never hear of a grand sea fight, A40 86a; FT 128; MP IV 92

Dithering & keen the winter comes, A18 55 etc; A29 R183; B3 1; SCVS 1; T I 287; TSP 67; EF 85; SC (January: A Winter's Day); JCSC 1; MP I 3

Do but look at our shadows, what strangers we've got, A31 149

Do but look what a beautiful midsummer eve, A39 11

Do ye like the heath lassie, C4 245; 20 II 362; LP 1019

Does fine words make a gentleman (fragment), MP II 288

Domestic flower beloved by all, A18 83; A50 R46; B3 R106; B4 72; MP II 226

Dost think that beauty's power (fragments), A32 9

Doubt thourt an ague shock for reason's soul, A48 14; MP II 190

Down among the green bushes I wander away, C3 105; 20 II 62; LP 719

Draws up his scarlet snout & cools to grey, B9 74; OA 273; NS 33

Dream not of love to think it like, A40 98a; B4 32; 18 19; Ch 336; T II 162; GG 155; FT 104; MP IV 458

Dropt here & there upon the flower, B2 202a; VM I 149; EP II 203

Dry stony banks are wreathed with Bindweed Flowers, LP 245

Dull must that being live, who sees unmoved, 7 15; C 64 [from Child Harold]

Dun-Grey and high the morning lies, A59 81; T II 64; LC 41

Dweller in pastoral spots life gladly learns, A54 419; A57 39; T II 325; MC 472; MP IV 324

Dwindling rose that lingers weary, A9 8; EP II 403

Dying gales of sweet even, D20 1; 6 13; SPP 193; EF 124; OA 292; LPJC 50; LP 56; C 80

 

 

Each bard woos his muse and each muse sends a doxey, A31 30; B7 69

Each cotter's bower beside their doors is seen (fragment), A21 17

[Each flower agen smiles thro' its evening dew: see How beautiful the spring]

Each hedge is cover'd thick with green, GG 89; LC 33

Each noise that breathed around us then [from 'Childhood'], W 124

Each scene of youth to mes a pleasing toy, A5 4 etc; B2 241; LM (Nov 1821) 542; VM II 14; T I 238; OA 38; W 62; EP II 298

Eat and drink till that would do, 1 243

Edmunds & Hellens Loves my verse woud sing, A24 1; A31 86; A40 21; EP II 549

E'en winter deemed so desolate and waste (fragment), A42 105

Elia thy reveries & visioned themes, A32 1; A40 71; A54 390; AS 122; T I 520; TSP 136; MC 439; MP IV 273

Eliza, farewell! ah, most lovely Eliza, PD 100; EP I 517

Eliza now the summer tells, 6 40; 8 5; PJCM 68; LPJC 88; X 177; LP 95; OA 322; W 172; C 45

Emblazon'd vapour! half eternal shade, A35 13; A40 129; A42 106; 24; Ch 279; T II 195; MP IV 494

[Emigrating swallows now: see O much I love thee autumn sere]

Emma leave the dinsome city, A10 R16; 22 7; EP II 445

Emma my darling the summer is bye, 20 I 261; PJCM 153; LP 535

England my country mong evils enthralling, B2 139; YULG 31 (1956) 39; L 49; EP II 69

England with pride I name thee--& with pride, 32 59; L 209; EP II 599

Enough of misery keeps my heart alive, 20 I 38; TSP 299; OA 345; LP 311; JCSC 54; B 102

Enslaved in bonds I write my dear to thee, C4 381; 20 II 443; LP 1092

Envy and hatred from the world's rude pack (fragment), A59 98; B6 147; T II 66; JR 58

Envy pale shade in pining dissaray; MP II 250

Ere I had known the world & understood, A23 8; A40 71; A54 390; LM (Sep 1822) 272; T I 520; GG 116; RM 124; MC 438; L 244; MP IV 272

Ere Meggy left hur man an' dad, C2 55; 1 140; 4 59; EP I 207

Ere the church bell i the morn had rung four, 3 156; EP II 101

Ere the sun oer the hills round & red 'gan a peeping, B1 18; T I 97; EP I 532; FT 201

Ere the sun the east reddens or yellows the hill, 2 46; EP I 494

Ere the world [and] I were known (fragment), A59 74

Ere yet the sun is two hours high (fragment), A59 79

Ere yet the year is one month old, A17 R10; A18 75; A48 24; T I 376; JR 21; WS 19; MP II 198

Eternal grand eternity of time, A50 R58; A54 367; RM 141; MC 416; MP IV 227

Eve cometh in with her attendant moon (fragment), A31 22

Evening her dusky mantle spread, 1 252; 15 48

Expression throbbing utterance of the soul, B2 149A; VM II 188; T I 275; EP II 90

 

 

Fair & affraid of men though always kind, A61 89; NS 94

Fair blooms the rose upon the green, B1 53; PD 128; T I 86; EP I 519

Fair bonny maid o' Sibbertoft, C4 137; 20 II 298; LP 957

Fair Daphne, when my love began, A40 88a; A54 299; B7 4; see also L 443n4

Fair grows the tree by the side of the fountain, 2 28; EP I 492

Fair is the bloom of lovly things, MP II 98

Fair is the farmer's daughter, 7 17

Fair maiden when my love began, MaC 65; T II 102; JR 61; MC 332; GS 142; MP IV 63

Fair was thy bloom when first I met, A40 69; A54 149; NG 118; T II 74; TSP 188; RM 57; MC 159; OA 180; MP III 361

Fairer the gales o' the morning, C3 409; 20 II 207; LP 870

Fa[i]rey elves those minute things, MP II 96

False time what is it but a rogues account, 19 130; LP 208

False was the heart that made the view (stray couplet), MP II 12

Fame is the race where many enter in (stray couplet), MP II 245

Fame seems not worth the meanest author's care (fragment), A46 54; A50 R57

Fame what is fame a poor unwinning game, A41 45; B6 R233; B9 R14; MP II 145

Fame will grow old like garments; time will wear [or 'tear'], B9 R28; 17 64; T II 70

Far far away be that ungentle ear, A12 9a; A13 35; EP II 479

Far from the life [or buzz] of market towns was seen, A31 163; T I 497; OA 80; EP II 666; B 19

Far spread the moorey ground a level scene, T I 419; JR 22; TSP 114; SPP 169; OA 167; W 90; GS 169; CK 56; MP II 347; E 87; B 45

Fare thee well thou pleasant place, 20 I 260; LP 534

Fare thee well till next we meet, C4 237; 20 II 357; LP 1014

Fare you well my own true love, B7 19; C1 8; 25; T II 179; TSP 204; FT 84; EP I 527; JCSC 40

Farewell! auld Scotland, hills, and moors, 20 I 19; 175; LP 290

Farewell lifes joys & pleasures games, B7 1; MP II 272

Farewell to love and all I see, 20 I 390; LP 654

Farewell to the bushy clump Close to the river, C3 129; 20 II 73; T II 518; LPJC 204; X 135; LP 730

Farewell to the cornfield and meadow so green, C3 119; 20 II 68; LP 725

Fast by a Brook beneath a bending willow, C2 62; 1 24a; 4 74; EP I 41

Fashion and folly always follow Fame, T II 383; TSP 238; LP 21

Father of all the life and light, C4 93; 20 II 274; LP 932

Fear not little younglings no robber is nigh ye, B2 123; BN 20; EP II 36

Fears ignorance their fancy only harms, A54 436; B6 63; MC 492; MP IV 352

Feign woud I look back agen in loves morning, 3 158; EP II 104

Field thoughts to me are happiness & joy, A54 410; A57 21; T II 307; WS 26; MC 461; PM 23; MP IV 311

Fill the foaming cups [or 'glass'] again, A13 5; VM II 142; L 176; EP II 469

First love will with the heart remain, A31 50; A40 74; A54 276; T II 83; SPP 43; RM 93; MC 302; GS 129; E 57; MP IV 11; K 35

First rosey that peeps on the bower, A10 3; EP II 420

Fixed in a white thorn bush its summer guest, A40 120; A54 342; 17 131; T II 244; WS 66; BP 99; RM 107; MC 387; JCB 31; OA 221; MP IV 153

Flow on winding river in silence for ever, C4 329; 20 II 411; PJCM 219; GG 233; OA 426; LPJC 274; LP 1062

Flowers shall hang upon the pawls, 20 I 208; T II 468; PJCM 148; GG 221; TSP 322; X 195; CC 44; LP 491; GS 324

Fly to the forest my lovely maid, C4 320; 20 II 406; LP 1057

Folks [or 'some'] talk of providence with heedless tongue, A40 56; A54 388; D14 3; AS 123; T I 522; MC 437; MP IV 269

Follys a fool that cannot keep her ground, EP II 477

Follys a hollow fool that would seem sound, A13 10 etc

Fond as the answering bird complains, A50 R77; MP II 242

For fellow-creatures which we long have known, 1 133; EP I 197

For fools that would wish to seem learned & wise, A3 74; B1 126; 1 220; 5 124; PD 32; T I 78; TSP 21; OA 9; EP I 304

For my youth in fruitles hopes decay, EP I 213

For paintings books essays & grottos (stray couplet) MP II 13

For raptures is its own decay (fragment), MP II 288

For summers would be evergreen when sloes was in their prime (fragment), D18 5

For sundays play he never makes excuse, A61 116; T II 348; JR 97; X 212; EF 117; NS 103

Forth fares the hedger in his leathern dress [or garb], A31 28; 17 110

Forth from its covert skips the timid hare (fragment), A57 R84

Forth walks the man of taste among the woods (fragment), A31 23

Four ladies sent me autographs, 7 21

Free from the cottage corner see how wild, A54 340; T II 129; SPP 19; RM 105; MC 384; GS 90; MP IV 148

Free smiles the daisy from rude night's embrace (fragment), B6 R231

Fresh as a virgin flower unstained and free (fragment), A42 103

Friend Hal, I'm fain to praise, but still, A18 80

Friend Lamb thou chusest well to love the lore, A40 122; A54 359; B4 R83; T II 112; TSP 194; RM 135; MC 407; MP IV 205

Friend Lubin loves his saturdays, A3 40; B1 122; 1 82; 5 144; EP I 112

Friend of my early days when fame was young (fragment), A60 13

Friend take my advise you would do yourself good, 1 108; EP I 155

From bank to bank the water roars Like thunder in a storm, C3 303; 20 II 157; PJCM 187; LPJC 224; LP 821; GS 344

From huddling nights embrace how chill, A13 27; T I 357; OA 83; EP II 682; W 79

From place to place they go afar they roam, A61 77; NS 85

From the hedge bottom where the ivy runs, A53 100; MP II 251

From the old roman bank at langley bush, A40 194; B8 R2; Pfz Misc 198

From yon black clump of wheat that grows, A46 136; A47 9; T II 232; JR 76; TSP 215; BP 77; MP II 169

Frost powders the grass (fragment), A59 84

Full many a sharp sad unprevented thorn, B2 146; VM II 186 T I 274; EP II 83

Full many troubles vext my hate, EP I 508

 

 

Gay nature owns no sympathy for man (fragment), A39 28

Gay nature's always laughing--folks may die, A50 21; T II 66

Gay rose the morn fulfilling many a prayer, A40 107; A54 29; B6 17; B8 1; T I 500; MC 32; CT 55; MP III 91

Gay was the Maid of Ocram, A40 93a; B4 40; PCFM 62; T II 171; TSP 200; FT 112; MP IV 430

Gee is thy name thou prating plodding creature, EP I 366

Genius a pleasing rapture of the mind, A5 10; 4 38; PD 98; T I 69; TSP 20; EP I 451

Gi me the life of the Villager man, A8 R37; EP II 402

Give me an old crone of a fellow, B7 25; T I 418; GG 115; 113

Give me lifes ease when my leafs turning yellow, A40 46; A54 307; 3 162; MC 342; MP IV 80

Give me no high flown fangled things [from 'The Flitting'], W 145

Give me the gloomy walk in summer time, A10 5; B2 276; 22 5; EP II 388

Give me the hour that puts to bed, A10 5a; EP II 423

Give me the leisure of a summers day, T I 365; EP II 671

Give thanks unto the Lord, A36 R20; Pfz. 198, 12 (ClJ 129); MP II 346

Glad as loves hope that meets the maidens smile, EP II 522

Glad Christmas comes and every hearth [see also Christmass is come], SCVS 93; NG 70; T I 338; LC 35; TSP 104; JCSC 31

Glinton thy taper spire predominates, A37 38; A54 380; B8 R114; T II 113; RM 121; MC 428; PM 45; E 96; MP IV 252

Go flattery go thou nothing cloathed in sound, A40 194; B8 R113; Pfz Misc 198; AS 124; T II 114; MP IV 589

Go, gain and worrit after wealth (fragment), B6 175

Go leave your loves unsung ye swain, A18 50; A39 2; A41 31; A54 315; MC 353; MP IV 105

Go not nigh her dwelling, C4 351; 20 II 424; LP 1073

Go rose my Chloe's bosom grace, C4 241; 20 II 360; Ch 184; T II 450; LPJC 268; LP 1016

Go Silly Brains the Master said, A3 106; B1 R171; 1 146; EP I 212

Go vile hypocrisy with subtle tongue, A54 383; B8 33; T II 117; MC 431; MP IV 258

Go where I [or 'we'] will nought but delight is seen [or 'heard'], A41 1; A55 10; B4 107; T II 125; MP II 128

'Go wipe your shoes' says mistress shrew, B1 17; 1 143; EP I 211

Go with your tauntings go, A31 48; A40 62a; A54 309; T II 203; GG 156; MC 345; MP IV 84; K 16

God bless us theres a mort to do, 20 1 47; LP 321

God lives alone in quiet thoughts, LP 30

God looks on nature with a glorious eye, 19 93; OA 336; LP 227

Gold is a general purchaser--buys all, A39 14; A48 16; MP II 192

Gone is my Jemmey fond loves only treasure, A10 13; EP II 439

Good & substantial painter merits raise, LP 246; L 679

Good e'enin to ye lassie, C4 269; 20 II 375; LP 1028

Good God & can it be that such a nook, A37 23; A51 63; A54 377; T II 134; RM 119; MC 426; MP IV 247

Good God, and what a happy race is there, A51 58

Good God, how the daisies are littered about, A57 R19

Good lady stay pity a poor begging orphan, A40 35a; B1 23; D4 8; 1 83; 5 173; EP I 113

Good morning Miss Lady Cow--what at these hours, A18 66; B9 R38; 17 88; MP II 310

Good morning to ye, bold and singing thrush, 11 409, i.b.cover

Good morning to you, honest swain, B6 179

Goosey goosey gander, MP II 158

Grand source of life and light, 20 I 73; PJCM 131; X 46; LP 353

Grass and flowers seem overjoyed in the merry moonlight, A31 7

Grasshoppers go in many a thrumming spring, A57 15; T II 330; JR 92; LC 51; EF 109; CC 17

Great men are always kind, however rare, LP 28

Great Nelsons glory near [or 'on'] the nile, A40 99a; A54 313; B4 76; B9 35; MC 351; MP IV 100

Great traveller that throws a luminous belt (fragment), MP II 336

[Greatford, with pleasing...: see Gritford with pleasing feelings do I leave]

Green clothing covers all the trees, C4 389; 20 II 447; LP 1096

Green hills of nature again I see, 20 I 372; LP 637

Green quiet peace be ever in the way, A59 90; NS 8

[Grey lichens grow about thy hills: see Grey lichens mid thy hills of creeping thyme]

Grey lichens mid thy hills of creeping thyme, A37 50; A53 72 etc.; T II 65; JR 56; TSP 187; MP II 115

Gritford with pleasing feelings do I leave, B2 121; EP II 32

Guardian Angels O protect me, C2 60a; 1 41; 4 71; 92; EP I 69; FT 195

 

 

Had I but half the faith and love, A57 34

Had I but loved as others do, A40 96a; B7 29; MP IV 445

Had they but got a bunch of bread, EP I 508

Hail dreaded fate of dark obscurity, A3 62; A40 36a; B1 114; EP I 386

Hail! dreary November, C4 77; 20 II 266; LP 923

Hail, early blossoms, peeping once again, 1 97

Hail England old England my Country & home, 1 23; EP I 38

Hail falling leaves that patter round, B1 25; D4 10; PD 76; AS 12; T I 80; EP I 337

Hail gentle winds I love your murmuring sounds, B1 39; 1 120; PD 144; T I 123; OA 65; EP I 185

Hail humble Helpstone where thy valies spread, A3 25; B1 97 etc; 1 225; 5 17; PD 3; T I 3; GG 33; TSP 3; X 140; OA 1; W 25; EP I 156

Hail scenes of Desolation & despair, A3 107; B1 R172; PD 142; T I 121; OA 11; EP I 417

Hail soothing balm--ye breezes blow, C1 1; C2 61a; 1 119; 4 72; VM I 180; T I 30; EP II 24

Hail to thee violet sweet carless spread, A40 37; B1 57; EP I 555

Hail Welland to thy reedy stream, C1 22; 1 74; 4 106; EP I 102

Happy as ballads of a brawling boy (fragment), A59 82; B6 75; T II 66

Happy Ellen near thy dwelling, C4 227; 20 II 351; LP 1008

Hard words to vague pretention seres like death, A54 398; A57 R74; T II 116; RM 132; MC 447; MP IV 291

Hark from amid the corn that happy brawl, 17 13; T II 126; MP II 303

Hark heard ye not the gentle rap, A47 19; T II 234; BP 80

Hark there's that churring noise we heard, T II 236; BP 83

Hark to that beautiful melody it is, A54 406; A57 R97; MC 457; MP IV 305

Hark what shrill mournful strains, C1 26a; 1 118; 4 131; EP I 184

Harken at joyous eve the happy sounds, A60 4; NS 17

Harken [or 'hark to'] that happy shout--the schoolhouse door, A54 340; 17 10; T II 130; JR 66; SPP 154; WS 43; RM 106; MC 385; GS 89; PR 80; MP IV 149

Harp of the fields, farewell, along farewell, A39 1

Harvest approaches with its busy [or 'bustling'] day, A18 79 etc; A19 1; A20 63; B6 11 etc; SCVS 68; T I 325; EF 98; SC (August); MP I 118

Harvest awakes the morning still, B6 5 etc; SCVS 76; T I 329; TSP 96; SC (September); JCSC 26; MP I 129

[Has love's gold ring been broken...: see Is loves gold ring been broken]

Hath the world been but madness, D18 10

Haunter of woods lone wilds & solitudes, D2 3; EP I 469

Have mercy, Lord of boundless love, A39 29; A40 103a; D19; MP IV 464

Hay making boys who watched the coming shower, A45 20; MP II 152

He always tells a story plain & plump, A61 64; T II 350; TSP 233; NS 77

He could not die when trees were green, 20 I 82; Ch 195; AS 174; T II 467; JR 124; TSP 321; X 113; EF 132; LP 363; GS 280

He does his feats to win a maiden's smile, A61 59

He eats a moments stoppage to his song, A61 49; T II 344; GG 171; X 214; EF 115; NS 69

He fights with all the whasps nests in his way, A61 129; NS 109

He fills his pockets & his hat provides, A61 115; T II 369; NS 102

He finds his old knife where the gipseys lay, NS 73

He goes about the fields from day to day, A61 101; T II 353; NS 95

He harmonized darkness to night & repose, 8 36; LP 139; C 23

He heard them oft but forced to let them be, NS 93

He is a simple worded good old man, 17 155

He is all bounce & froth like ginger beer (stray line), MP II 335

He laughs and jests where many are (fragment), A30 176

He leans on nature's offerings for supply (fragments), A18 198

He lived not from his cradle thus forlorn (fragments), A27 R22

He lives among the persecuted poor, T II 353; NS 96

He loved the brook's soft sound, C3 357; 20 II 180; T II 517; PJCM 194; GG 230; LPJC 229; TSP 326; X 104; OA 408; LP 845; W 195; GS 348; E 92

He made no promise which he did not brake (stray couplet), MP II 332

He makes a rattle with his leathern coat, A61 106; NS 97

He never knew a book & never bought, A61 84; NS 90

He offered presents which was freely ta'en (fragment), B7 27

He one from another shall separate them, Bod. MS Don.a.8, f. 3v (ClJ 141)

He plays with other boys when work is done, A61 117; T II 348; JR 98; X 213; NS 104

He scampered [to] the bushes far away, T II 334; OA 245; W 160; X 102; GS 120; NS 26

He sung of the seasons he sung of the day, EP II 134

He takes her load & talks her journey home, A61 69; NS 80

He that dwelleth in the secret place, 6 56; LP 134; c 123

He that has witt from Nature for a fool, 1 84; EP I 117

He turns about to face the loud uproar, T II 333; X 103; DW [32]; OA 247; W 161; GS 122; NS 27; PR 83; JCSC 47

He waits all day beside his little flock, A61 51; T II 344; JR 96; LC 54; OA 267; NS 70

Health never did desire the grave for rest, A50 R52; MP II 228

Heart and soul are thine forever (fragment), A62 2

Heathens shall fear thy name, 19 134

Helen Maria! lovely Helen!, C4 59; 20 II 255; LPJC 249LP 912

Her cheeks are like roses, 6 20; OA 302; LPJC 61; LP 68

Her cheeks did like the roseys glow, EP II 478

Her cot has got the shutters closed, C3 301; 20 II 157; LP 818

Her dusky mantle Eve had 'spread, A3 81; B1 136; 1 252; 5 48; PD 43; T I 88; EP I 349

Her eyes are bright as the stars by night, 20 I 323; LP 593

Her eyes like suns did glad my sight (fragment), MP II 352

Her face seems to me in the blush of the briar, B6 127

Her hair bound in tortoise or else loosley flowing, C1 13; 1 36; 4 86; EP I 59

Her hair was swarthy brown & soft of hue, A18 72 etc; A41 33; A54 357; B4 R61 etc; MaC 70; MC 405; MP IV 199

Her lips were like twin roses which the morn (fragment), A42 104

Her maiden name was Eleanor Who stole my heart away, C3 437; 20 II 225; LP 883

Her partner is the merriest wench that lives, A61 105

Her very dress steals graces from her looks (stray couplet), MP II 107

Here are violets Jessy for thy sleep, LP 506

Here comes I that never came before, B3 57; MP II 253

Here down the meadow runs a path, A41 11; T II 233; JR 77; BP 78

Here grandeur triumphs at its topmost pitch, B2 133a; VM II 175; T I 268; EP II 58

Here in [or on] the greensward & the old molehills, A40 181; A51 74; A54 368; B5 73; T II 138; RM 142; MC 417; MP IV 230

Here is the scenes the rural poet made, 19 68; LP 200

Here lies a man of reason rare, C1 10; 1 130; EP I 193

Here lyes Lifes Cobler who untimly fell, A3 137; B1 8; 1 235; 5 76; AW 50; EP I 330

Here lies the gem & happiness of life, A41 51; B6 R223; T II 122; MP II 148

Here little [or 'like'] Johnney Horner, A31 24; FT 150; MP II 76

Here morning in the ploughmans songs are met, A59 96; B6 99; T II 311; GG 16; NS 13

Here pedlars rave and rant aloud (fragment), A21 R56; 17 46

Here sparrows built upon the trees, 20 I 148; Ch 241; AS 145; NG 149; T II 476; JR 127; WS 54; X 118; OA 366; LP 435; B 112

Here underneath the stiles moss covered post, A54 407; A57 R83; T II 305; MC 458; MP IV 307

Here we meet i' the moon light hour, C3 271; 20 II 140; LP 804

Here we meet too soon to part, A8 R33 etc; PD xv; NG 37; OA 64; L 21; EP I 463

Here's a health to all the pretty girls that dwell about Dundee, C3 193; 20 II 100; LPJC 210; LP 764

Heres a health to bonny Scotland and the land o' the west, C4 285; 20 II 385; LP 1038

Heres a health unto thee bonny lassie O, 6 19; LPJC 60; OA 301; FT 197; C 92

Here's a sad good bye for thee, my love, A40 95; 18 13; Ch 330; T II 158; TSP 196; FT 83; MP IV 439

Heres a valentine nosegay for Mary, 20 1 28; Ch 219; T II 431; LP 301

Here's black misfortune hauds me down, 20 I 36; TSP 312; LP 586

Here's summer come anew, B6 210

Here's the aconite a showing flower, 20 I 396; LP 658

Here's the old fairy rigns by this dark thicket side, A49 32

Here's the snail with his fine painted shell at his back, A30 c

Here's to auld Scotland's hills and dells, C3 51; 20 II 27; LP 691

Here's violets, Jessy, for thy sleep, 20 I 112, 227

Heres where Mary loved to be, 6 1, 6; 7 55; LPJC 39; OA 282; LP 45; C 58

Hesperus the day is gone, 20 I 152; PJCM 143; GG 221; TSP 310; OA 367; LP 439; V 170; GS 314; PR 74; B 114

High mountain peaks that in the dizzy gleam (fragment), A58 6

High overhead that silent throne, OA 241; JCB 77

His face is like a dragon, A62 R9; LP 104; C 107

Hobbling to labour by some pasture side, EP I 362

Hoist up your blue my boys the brave & true, 30 64; L 580; MP II 337

Home furthest off grows dearer from the way, A59 62; B6 107; T II 311

Home was a thought and hardly more (fragment), B6 171

Honesty tho kings [or 'men'] revile thee, A18 68; A50 R52; MP II 229

Honey dew falls from a tree, 20 I 266; PJCM 155; X 176; LP 539

Honey words make charms of blisses, 20 I 325; T II 508; LP 595

Hop and jump over troubles (fragment), A57 R72b

Hope is a cordial for distress, A57 48

Hopes cheering light is seen of every eye, A59 100; 29 15; NS 16

Hopes have many autumns so have joys, 20 I 163; LP 452

Hope's sun shines sweet, but who of hopes are proud (fragment), A42 104

Hot summer's sweet minstrel, the laughing bee (fragment), A21 R61

Hot was the morn [or noon] in summers sultry hour, A3 111 etc; B1 R175; EP I 419

How aggravating 't'is to hear, C2 69a; 1 96; 4 121; EP I 132

How beautiful & fresh the pastoral smell, A54 378; A58 17; T II 135; JR 67; RM 120; MC 427; MP IV 250

How beautiful is daybreak light betimes, A40 76a; B4 R102; T II 120; MP IV 387

How beautiful is Spring! the sun gleams gold, 20 I 96; T II 436; OA 356; LP 378

How beautiful is Sunset eye & breast, 10 end flyleaf; PJCM 190; LP 258; PM 55

How beautiful it is to be, C3 91; 20 II 51; LP 710

How beautiful May and its morning comes in!, LP 1108

How beautiful the eve comes in, 20 I 267; MaC 43; T II 420; OA 383; LP 541

How beautiful the hazy morning seems!, C4 55; 20 II 253; LP 910

How beautifull the morning blue And light o' nearly grey, C3 143; 20 II 78; PJCM 177; LP 737

How beautiful the snowdrop shines, C1 20; 1 67; 4 102; EP I 95; K 3

How beautiful the spring resumes its reign, A18 102; A21 18; A30 49 etc; A39 38; A40 112; A54 8; B9 1; MC 8; MP III 25, 48

How beautiful the summer night, C3 55; 20 II 30; T II 489; PJCM 177; X 178; LP 693

How beautiful the sun went down And lovely shone the moon, C3 337; 20 II 171; LP 836

How beautiful the white thorn shews its leaves, 20 I 248; OA 382; LP 523

How beautiful ye breathe ye passing gales, 20 I 151; LP 438

How blasted nature is, the scene is winter, C3 287; 20 II 148; LPJC 221; LP 813

How blest is he--the happiest mortal known, 1 225; EP I 309

How blest Ive felt on summer eves, A54 229; A57 R92; RM 77; MC 245; MP III 525

How brightly shines the heather, C4 309; 20 II 399; LP 1051

How calm is the even down in the narrow lane, C3 111; 20 II 65; LP 722

How can I sing the songs of love, 20 I 70; LP 350

How cheerful along the gay mead, C3 427; 20 II 220; Ch 148; T II 461; LP 877

How chill the soft air meets ones face & yet, A12 R14; EP II 466

How dear to me the wild rose tree, C4 129; 20 II 294; LP 952

How delightfuly pleasent when the cool chilling air, C2 33a; 1 19; 4 15; EP I 36

How do my kitty said snuffy nosd ben, A40 46a; B2 206a; B3 10; EP II 209

How dread insensible death seems to be, EP II 520

How eager doth he eddy round, A15 R10; T I 242; GG 83; EP II 496

How fearful tis when lighting fires, A31 151; MP II 99

How fond the rustics [or labourers] ear at leisure dwells, A15 2; VM II 104; T I 215; OA 76; EP II 645

How fresh the air the birds how busy now, A54 434; A57 8; T II 247; WS 56; BP 104; MC 489; OA 207; GS 99; MP IV 348

H[o]w gl[o]r[iou]s [i]s th[e] s[u]mm[e]r [i]n [i]ts pr[i]m[e], H23; LP 235

How highly esteem'd is the sweet smelling rose, C2 69a; 1 95; 4 120; EP I 130

How hot the sun rushes, 20 I 234; LPJC 180; SPP 202; OA 379; GS 325; LP 510

How I love the dear wild & the desolate heath, Pfz Misc 198; OA 145; MP IV 577

How lovely, afresh, are we breathing again, A30 128; B6 R164

How lovely is the wild rose when dripping wi the rain, C3 397; 20 II 200; LP 864

How lovly the thorn in the newly laid hedges, 1 32; EP I 54

How many a joy & sorrow buried lies (stray couplet), MP II 334

How many a smiling babe hath died, 32 15; FT 25; L 262

How many friends death steals how many more, A27 13; A48 15; B9 R30; T II 66; MP II 294

How many pages of sweet natures book, A46 R161; A54 345; 17 15; AS 124; T II 145; MC 390; MP IV 163

How many times spring blossoms meek, C3 361; 20 II 182; Ch 147; LP 846

How many times with weary feet, A23 2; EP II 532

How mournful glides this purling streem, A6 16; 1 16; 4 11; EP I 30

How much of time the lover throws away, C4 233; 20 II 355; LP 1012

How now have at ye brother Rip, MP II 331

How oft a summer shower hath started me, A54 402; A57 R121; T II 317; SPP 162; OS 71; MC 451; GS 81; PM 99; MP IV 298

How oft Ive lay tween waking & a dream, A48 18; EP II 531

How oft Ive noticed when the west sky blazed, EP I 380

How oft on Sundays when Id time to tramp, A11 2a; 2 42; 3 165; VM I 122; NG 45; PCFM 67; T I 180; TSP 57; OA 48; W 65; EP II 119

How oft (with hat pulld oer my eyes), EP I 247

How peacable it seems for lonely men, 20 I 216; MaC 60; T I 446; JC [6]; BP 135; OA 376; LP 498; JCB 9; W 194; E 42

How peaceful sound the chiming bells, C4 281; 20 II 383; OA 423; LP 1036

How pleasant are the fields to roam & think, A54 404; A57 R105; SPP 160; MC 454; GS 82; PM 21; MP IV 302

How pleasant are the windings of a river, 20 I 72; LP 352

How pleasant falls the shower the very sound, 17 4; MP II 206

How pleasant is the evening walk With one kind hearted Lassie, C3 201; 20 II 109; LP 773

How pleasant when athirst in burning days, A37 23; A54 376; MC 425; MP IV 246

How pleasant when the heat of day is bye, A10 5; B2 276a; 22 5; VM II 202; T I 280; EP II 389

How pleasing simplest recollections seem, A11 10a; B2 274a; VM II 197; T I 278; OA 46; EP II 383

How silent comes this gentle wind, 20 I 242; LPJC 184; LP 519; GS 328

How soft the evening landscape fades away, A18 84; A41 48

How strange the wood appears in dark and white (fragment), A59 86; B6 59; T II 66

How sweet & dear to taste's warm bosom and to health's flusht cheek, 7 13; EP I 500

How sweet & pleasant grows the way, A54 248; A57 R71; T II 228; BP 69; MC 267; OA 233; JCB 85; JCSJ 4 5; E 45; MP III 553

How sweet and richly smells the hawthorn may (fragment), D17

How Sweet are Spring wild flowers that grow past the counting, C4 195; 20 II 330; Ch 176; LP 989

How sweet are the songs o' the birds i' the bushes, C3 65; 20 II 35; LP 699

How sweet does the hour seem When the sun's gone bed, C3 269; 20 II 139; LPJC 220; LP 803

How sweet is a stroll in the field, C4 97; 20 II 276; LP 934

How sweet is every length'ning day, C4 266; 20 II 373; Ch 155; PJCM 217; X 189; LP 1027

How sweet is the whisper that comes from the willows, C4 131; 20 II 295; LP 953

How sweet it is when suns get warmly high, A11 12a; B2 276; VM II 201; T I 280; EP II 387

How sweet it usd to be when april first, B2 150; VM I 98; T I 233; EP II 91

How sweet Ive wanderd bosom deep in grain, A11 9; B2 271; VM II 194; T I 277; EP II 374; E 15

How sweet sings the thrush i' the mornings o' March, C3 399; 20 II 201; LP 865

How sweet the happy evening hails, 19 48; LPJC 118; LP 188

How sweet the moon extends her cheering ray, A3 62; B1 114; 5 117; PD 136; T I 121; EP I 385

How sweet [or swift] the rack flies through the skies, C4 179; 20 II 320; PJCM 210; LP 980

How sweet the spring buds are all burst to leaves, 10 117; LP 257

How sweet the winds o' evening comes through the ash tree bough[s], C3 401; 20 II 202; PJCM 197; WS 90; LP 865

How sweet the wood shades the hot summer hours, A23 R43; A40 71a; T I 518; OA 109; EP II 547

How sweet the woodbines fragrant flowers, C4 111; 20 II 285; LPJC 255; LP 943

How sweet to be thus nestling deep in boughs, B2 135a; VM II 176; AS 45; PCFM 85; T I 269; EP II 62

How sweet to sit on April banks (fragment), A59 75a

How sweet when weary dropping on a bank, B2 132a; VM II 173; T I 267; JR 17; OA 27; W 52; EP II 55

How swift our lives are made to run, MP II 314

[How swift the rack: see How sweet the rack flies through the skies]

How varying is the taste [or task] of man, A4 5; B1 115; 1 3; EP I 13

How welcome & sweet is springs infant dawning, 1 31; EP I 50

Hugh elm thy [or 'with'] rifted trunk all notched & scarred, A40 111; A42 9; A54 342; AS 87; T II 130; GG 152; JR 66; TSP 195; X 86; RM 107; MC 387; GS 149; MP IV 154

Humble and handsome with affection's heart (fragment), A57 15

Humbug is pleas'd with tinsel's showy gauds (fragment), B9 R22

Hush! lullaby, my baby, nor mix thy tears with mine, A40 91; B4 26; T II 178; FT 91; MP IV 420

 

 

I am black but comely, as the curtains of Solomon, 15 127

I am the man that affliction hath seen, 6 50; LP 143; C 95

I am wae and weary sister, C4 371; 20 II 437; LP 1085

I am--yet what I am, none cares or knows, 20 I 111; AS 176; NG 157; T II 523; PJCM 132; GG 219; JR 132; LC 70; JC [15]; TSP 297; SPP 195; EF 133; CC 1; LP 396; OA 361; W 193; V 168; GS 311; PM 11; JCSC 52; PR 76; E 90; B 107

I cannot bethink me the matter, A18 52; A41 26; A54 288; D6; MC 318; MP IV 39

I cannot brag afore ye men, C4 117; 20 II 288; LP 946

I cannot if I would be gay, 20 I 296; LP 567

I cannot know what country owns thee now, A61 40; T II 343; NS 64

I cannot touch the harp again, C3 3; 20 II 2; Ch 178; T II 450; PJCM 162; LP 666

I can't contain myself in summer's prime, A37 19; A58 2

I do not love thee, 20 I 220; PJCM 152; GG 222; TSP 313; X 171; OA 377; LP 501; JCSC 54; B 117; K 60

I dreaded walking where there was no path, A61 75; T II 373; NS 83; E 9

I dreamed a warning dream, A31 16; A50 R54; MP II 234

I dreamd & even think I see him now, 1 16; EP I 32

I dreamed of love and thought it sweet, A40 98; T II 208; MP IV 454; K 17

I dreamd not what it was to woo, A15 1; A40 69a; A54 280; LM (Jul 1821) 76; T II 85; RM 96; MC 307; L 289; E 59; MP IV 23; K 32

I envy e'en the fly its gleams of joy, C4 257; 20 II 370; MaC 92; T II 523; PJCM 217; JR 132; GG 233; TSP 341; X 106; CC 73; LP 1023; OA 422; GS 356

I ever loved the simple flower, 20 I 172; LP 462

I feel at times so sweet a mood (fragment), A57 R106

I feel I am;--I only know I am, 20 I 113; T II 524; PJCM 133; SPP 196; X 211; LP 397; OA 361; V 173; GS 311

I fly from all I prize the most, 20 I 186; PJCM 143; OA 370; LP 471; B 115

I found a ball of grass among the hay, A61 6; T II 370; GG 173; LC 56; WS 78; TSP 234; CC 29; OA 263; W 154; NS 54; E 54

I had a dream,--I thought I spoke, 20 I 88; LP 370; K 61

I had a joy & keep it still alive, A54 399; A57 59; T II 124; MC 448; JCSJ 16 9; MP IV 292

I had na been so busy, C4 47; 20 II 250; T II 461; LPJC 247; LP 907

I hate the very noise of troublous man, A61 9; T II 375; GG 174; X 190; EF 119; NS 55

I hate to see mans strength employd, A23 10; EP II 539

I have a wish I dare not name, A31 100A; 17 40; MP II 306

I have heard thee sing of plaintive things, A40 83; B9 4; MP IV 391

I have often thought how beautiful thou wert (fragment), A31 13

I have some thoughts I fain would tell, A40 85; B9 2; MP IV 398

I have traced the valleys fair, A36 13; A40 135; A54 164; RM 52; MC 175; MP III 410; K 47

I hear the red breasts faint & feeble note, A7 34a; T I 284; BP 26; EP II 398

I heard of parnuss hill castalias stream, A31 2; MP II 136

I heard thee O Lord & was stricken with fear, 8 39 etc; LP 147; C 23

I hid my love when young while I, C4 13; 20 II 234; T II 513; PJCM 200; GG 230; JR 129; WS 92; TSP 335; SPP 198; LP 891; OA 411; V 180; GS 352; JCSC 57; B 121; K 62

I in my summer rambles love to see, T II 233; JR 77; BP 76

I joined a group on last year's eve, 29 18

'I knew him from a child' the clerk would say [from 'The Fate of Genius'], W 76

I know a little nook, NS 61

I know him not my mither dear, C4 295; 20 II 391; LP 1044

I know that I love thee, 20 I 355; LP 622

I lay and listened on the grass, B6 149

I lay me down with thoughts of thee, 20 I 159; PJCM 139; X 175; LP 449; K 63

I lie me down, and then I think, 20 I 85; LP 366

I like the lad that' like mysel, C4 305; 20 II 397; LP 1049

I live and love as others do, C4 375; 20 II 440; T II 251; LP 1088

I long to forget them--the love of my life, LP 14

I long to think of thee in lonely midnight, 19 95; LPJC 147; LP 226

I longed for the freedom (fragment), A57 3

I look before a cold and dreary doom (fragment), A42 105

I look on nature less with critics eyes, A54 420; A57 44; T II 308; MC 473; MP IV 326

I look on the past & I dread dark tomorrow, 3 163; UBS (Jun 1937) 65; EP II 115; GS 361

I look upon the hedge row flower, 20 I 149; Ch 242; LP 436

I looked about and started more to find, A61 37

I lost the love, of heaven above, 20 I 25; MaC 96; T II 526; PJCM 133; JR 134; GG 219; LC 71; SPP 198; TSP 297; X 211; LP 297; OA 343; V 167; GS 274; JCSC 53; E 90

I love at early morn, from new-mown swath, JR 42; WS 27; CC 72; W 130

I love at eventide to walk alone, A54 339; 17 119; T II 129; JR 65; LC 45; SPP 151; WS 24; CC 18; RM 105; JCSJ 3 28; MC 383; GS 62; E 19; MP IV 146

I love her just the same as ever Though now she looks above me, C3 307; 20 II 158; LP 822

I love in summer time to seek a seat, A24 16; EP II 576

[I love it well at summer's birth: see I love it well in summer's hours]

I love it well in summer's hours, A30 146; A31 139 etc.; B7 R20a; MP II 60

I love it well oercanopied in leaves, A45 15; A54 172; T II 36; JR 53; SPP 130; MC 183; OA 183; GS 57; E 16; MP III 425

I love [pale] Primroses wi their mole eyed faces, C4 335; 20 II 415; LP 1065

I love the awthorn well, LPJC 127; LP 200

I love the black e'en o' the scented bean blossom, C4 365; 20 II 433

I love the blue violet that creeps on the mossy bank, C3 293; 20 II 150; PJCM 187; LPJC 221; LP 814

I love the fitfull gusts that shakes, 20 I 259; Ch 215; AS 163; T II 412; JR 114; LC 61; LPJC 187; WS 34; TSP 305; X 49; LP 532; OA 382; GS 329

I love the Forest and its airy bounds, T II 380; PJCM 54; TSP 237; LP 24; X 69

I love the hawthorn well, 19 69

I love the heath, where spring had used to lie, 20 I 44; T II 404; LP 316

I love the leisure of a summer's day, A31 168

I love the little pond to mark at spring, 19 73; OA 334; LP 203; PM 81

I love the mossy fountain, C3 407; 20 II 205; LPJC 235; LP 868

I love the name of woman, 7 25

I love the pastoral vales, B6 41

I love the rath primroses pale brimstone primroses, C4 149; 20 II 304; LPJC 259; LP 963; OA 417

I love the raving winds, the murky gloom, LP 239

I love the slender spire to see, A61 39

I love the song of tree and wind, 20 I 135; LP 421

I love the thistle with its ruddy flowers, 20 I 210; LP 492

I love the weeds along the fen, PM 85

I love the wild spots far from town (fragment), B3 94

I love thee casterton & often tell, A61 32

I love thee dearly my own bonny Maid, C4 9; 20 II 232; LP 889

I love thee in thy mouldering trance, A29 71; B7 38c; MP II 35

I love thee Lucy love thee well, C1 15; 1 40; 4 91; EP I 68

I love thee, nature, in my inmost heart (The Return), X 168

I love thee nature with a boundless love, 20 I 225; Ch 135; T II 514; PJCM 152; GG 223; TSP 314; LP 505; OA 378; GS 324

I love thee sweet [or my] Mary but love thee in fear, A8 R30; B2 247; B5 99; 4 42; LM (Nov 1821) 544; VM I 195; T I 252; OA 40; EP II 314

I love those scenes so wild and free, A18 R124

I love thy landscapes wild and free (fragment), B7 38b

I love thy shade, A2 R126; A11 10; B2 273; EP II 379

I love to drop in summer on the grass, A24 17; EP II 577

I love to hear a summer tale, A59 5; CT 10

I love to hear the evening crows go bye, A61 47; T II 363; JR 100; X 50; OA 241; NS 67; E 43

I love to hear the Nightingale, PJCM 59; X 95; LP 16

I love to hear the uproar of the wind, A50 R75; A53; MP II 242

I love to hide me on a spot that lies, 17 12; T II 125; JR 63; MP II 302

I love to mark the bustling deer, MP II 33

I love to peep out on a summers morn, A11 10; B2 274; VM II 196; T I 277; JR 19; LC 31; X 63; OA 45; EP II 381

I love to roam in spring by hedgerow sides, A22 6; EP II 528

I love to roam the woods, A54 243; A57 R115; MC 260; PM 91; MP III 545

I love to see the forest maid, T II 381; PJCM 55; LP 20

I love to see the old heaths withered brake, A48 9; A53 54; A54 396; AS 126; T II 146; JC [14]; SPP 138; MC 445; OA 212; W 136; GS 74; JCSJ 3 36; MP IV 286

I love to see the slender spire, 419; L 636

I love to see the summer beaming forth, C4 259; 20 II 370; T II 410; LPJC 270; EF 132; LP 1024

I love to stroll the meadow when its mown, A54 420; A57 40; MC 473; MP IV 325

I love to wander at my idle will, A40 59a; A51 41; A54 385; T I 523; RM 123; MC 434; OA 103; MP IV 263

I love to wander by the ivy bank, B9 85; NS 40

I loved a Scotch then Irish girl, C3 291; 20 II 149; LP 813

I loved the Forest walks and beechen woods, LP 27

I loved the Lasses dearly When I wadn't but a boy, C3 209; 20 II 107; LPJC 212; LP 771

I loved the pleasant way to school, 7 23; 48

I loved the wild spots far from town, MP II 269

I loved thee, though I told thee not, 30 58; MaC 71; T II 264; LC 49; TSP 223; GG 164

I may be canna sing But I mun up, and try a verse or two, C3 137; 20 II 76; LP 734

I met a maid, her hair was long, A60 3

I met my love in summer days, C4 127; 20 II 293; LP 951

I met my love one Sunday e'en And Lovely was the weather, C3 405; 20 II 204; LP 867

I met thee like the morning tho more fair, A22 13; A40 73; Ch 256; T I 529; TSP 138; EP II 529

I met thee on a sabath eve, 20 I 192; LP 477

I met thee on life's dreary way, B3 104

I ne'er was struck before that hour, C3 23; 20 II 12; T II 504; PJCM 165; JR 128; GG 224; TSP 323; X 147; OA 398; LP 677; V 179; JCSC 56; K 64

I never pass a venerable tree, A40 72; A54 393; LM (Dec 1822) 560; T I 521; GG 116; RM 126; MC 441; GS 179; PM 93; MP IV 278

I never saw a man in all my days, A51 R87; A57 R100; B6 28; T II 128; JR 64; X 79; RM 104; MP IV 585

I oft look back upon my shepherd life, A44 21; A57 35

I often longed when wandering up & down, A61 38; T II 374; NS 63

I often pause to seek thee when I pass, A54 428; A57 37; MC 471; OA 237; MP IV 323

I often roam a minute from the path, A37 21; A51 36; A54 380; AS 128; T II 147; MC 429; MP IV 253

I often wander by an ancient dyke, A57 R97; B6 28; Pfz Misc 198; T II 316; MP IV 584

I opened the casement this morn at star light, C3 213; 20 II 110; T II 457; LPJC 212; LP 774

I pause and hear a voice that speaks aloud, A50 R43; A51 105

I peeled bits o' straws and I got switches too, T II 512; LPJC 246; EF 131; LP 906; OA 413; GS 353; B 122

I pluck summer blossoms, 20 I 1; Ch 189; T II 428; LP 269

I pulled a wild rose frae the brere, C3 377; 20 II 149; LP 854

[I saw a girl just to my mind: see I saw the girl...]

I Saw a Tree with Cheries Red, EP I 513

I saw her crop a rose, 20 I 287; Ch 209; AS 160; T II 491; TSP 319; LP 559; K 65

I saw her in my springs young choice, 8 64; LPJC 78; LP 86; OA 316; C 28

I saw the lamb who opened the first seal, LP 150

I saw the girl just to my mind, C1 8a; EP I 361; FT 206

I saw thee in lifes witching hour, A18 72; A48 23; B4 118; MP II 195

I seek for peace--I care not where its found, B2 244a; C2 49; 4 48; VM II 160; T I 261; EP II 307

I seek her in the shady grove, 20 I 48; Ch 228; T II 502; GS 278; LP 324

I seek the shops that full o noise, A16 28; B2 209a; T I 242; EP II 216; JCSJ 4 41

I sigh with the wind like a storm stricken tree, 20 I 321; LP 592

I sing no songs to make thee grieve, 20 I 61; T II 496; LP 339

I sing of Primroses pale sweet Primroses, C3 5; 20 II 3; LP 667

I sing the top name of all Sallys, A9 14

I sit & think of distant hills, A54 245; A57 R112; MC 262; MP III 548

I sit to see the landscape fade away, A18 84; A41 48; A54 366; MC 414; MP IV 223

I sit upo a simmer bank, 19 4; LPJC 99; LP 164

I sleep with thee, and wake with thee, 20 I 23; T II 497; PJCM 128; OA 342; GS 276; LP 294; K 66

I sought my little walking stick that, A18 63; MP II 7

I talk to the birds as they sing i' the morn, C4 169; 20 II 315; T II 507; OA 419; LP 974

I tell thee love I love thee dear, A16 8; EP II 498

I think I never felt before, A46 153; MP II 158

I think I'm as rich as a man need to be, A51 107; A54 319; B8 117; MC 358; MP IV 112

I think of thee at early day, A62 2; 6 45; PJCM 91; GG 202; LPJC 64; X 165; LP 72; OA 304; L 653; K 54; C 118

I think where Mary's memory stays, A61 30

I thought thy face so beautiful (fragment), A42 104

I took a walk last sabbath day In my best sunday suit, 20 II 106; LP 770

I trace every blossom that grows in the field, 20 I 377; LP 642

I urge no muse new [or 'her'] terrors to impart, A13 42; EP II 488

I walk with thee and meet the spring, C3 11; 20 II 6; LP 671

I walked with poesy in the sonnet's bounds, A40 51a; Pfz. 198, 54 (ClJ 348); MP IV 357

I wandered down a green wood side, C4 209; 20 II 341; LP 998

I wandered forth to view the streams, C3 425; 20 II 217, 218; LP 876

I wandered out one rainy day, A61 78; T II 339; JR 95; WS 63; X 99; BP 110; JCB 76; OA 268

I well remember by this leaning gate A18 83; MP II 225

I went along the great wood side, A61 121; NS 106

I went in the fields with the leisure I got, T II 379; TSP 237; LP 26; GS 211

I went my Sunday mornings rounds, 20 I 358; LPJC 191; OA 393; LP 625; V 178

I went out wi' Eliza a bonny lass, 10 46; LP 252

I will not throw away the flower, 10 I 91; TSP 301; LP 373

I will not urge the muses (fragment), A18 78; A50 R47

I wish I had for well I know, 20 I 300; LP 571

I wish I was a little bird, C4 243; 20 II 361; LP 1017

I wish I was a bonny thrush, 20 I 374; LP 640

I wish I was a wild woodbine, C4 307; 20 II 398; LP 1050; K 69

I wish I was where I would be / Alone with beauty & the free, 19 20; LPJC 103; X 110; LP 170

I wish I was where I would be / With love alone to dwell, C4 21; 20 II 238; T II 523; LPJC 240; X 170; SPP 196; LP 894; OA 411; V 181; GS 351

I wish that I was but a gay blushing rose, 1 201; EP I 291

I wish the king cups they would come again, LP 911

I would do only what is right (fragment), D17

I would not be a wither'd leaf, 20 I 212; OA 374; LP 495; K 91

I would not feign a single sigh, C3 73; 20 II 41, 92; T II 454; PJCM 174; GG 227; X 170; LP 703; K 70

I would not pull a weed away, 20 I 290; T II 492; LP 562; K 67

I would not that my being all should die, A54 349; B4 R101; B7 59; 30 99; T II 106; TSP 192; RM 113; MC 395; PM 109; E 105; MP IV 176

I would not that my life should be (fragment), A22 3

I would not think thee half so fair, 20 I 275; LP 548; K 71

I would not wish the burning blaze, A59 36; T II 265

[I'...: see also In...]

If a body greets a body in a narrow lane, B7 33; FT 177; MP II 130

If abscence can forget me, 20 I 393; LP 656

If any wants a friend the first & best, A61 31; NS 60

If beauty be fading it charmeth the heart, A11 9; B2 271a; EP II 374

If feelings that fond bosoms move, B2 150a; EP II 93

[If hailing curry favouring tothers: see No hailing curry...]

If Kittys rosy presence now, C2 63; 1 27; 4 75; EP I 42

If love be such a wilderness, A40 89; A54 300; B7 5; T II 207; MC 333; MP IV 64

If ones summers day ye will bid care adieu love, A14 2a; EP II 490

If theres a weapon fate prepares, 3 155; L 67; EP II 100

If wishes could be gaind and I might have, C2 63; 1 27; 4 76; EP I 43

I'll come to thee at even tide, 9 4; LPJC 155; SPP 202; TSP 292; LP 248; OA 336; GS 357

I'll gang and see Phemie she's fair and she's asy, C4 229; 20 II 352; LP 1009

I'll lay me down on the green sward, C4 67; 20 II 260; Ch 152; AS 153; T II 515; LPJC 251; LP 917

I'll meet thee in the evening love the still time o' the day, C4 379; 20 II 442; T II 495; LP 1091

Ill neer walk at even Jim [or 'grim'], A10 15a; MaC 17; T I 248; TSP 62; EP II 444

[I'm Swordy Well a piece of land: see Petitioners are full of prayers]

I'm silverless, and pennyless, 20 I 78; TSP 300; LP 358

In a bonny black wench & the best I set eyes on, B1 42; EP I 543

In a fair town on the banks of the Wellan, C2 47; 4 44; 175; EP I 357

In a huge cloud of mounain hue (Fragment), X 52, PM 41

In a spot where a bard or a readable book, A17 11; MP II 3

In an old town of low livd fun, EP I 384

In April all the lanes and woods are full of, 20 I 270; LP 543

In April time, flowers come like dreams, 20 I 29; TSP 298; LP 303

In Ashton lawn condemned to slow decay, A54 399; A57 59; T II 124; MC 448; JCSJ 16 9; MP IV 293

In autumn time how oft hes [or 'he often'] stood to mark, EF 39; OA 49

In beauty there is joy for ever, C4 185; 20 II 324; LP 983

In bed she like a lily lay, 20 I 62; PJCM 115; X 172; LP 341

In cant & mystery there lurks a wrong, 10 91; LP 253

In civil [wars and] strife affection wears the rust, A44 9; A51 75; MP I 291

In country town,--as story goes, B1 12; EP I 164

I' crime and enmity they lie, C4 323; 20 II 408; T II 470; PJCM 218; TSP 335; X 145; OA 425; LP 1058; JCSC 58

In early March, before the lark, A47 3; A53 22; T II 226; TSP 214; BP 68

In every step we tread appears fresh spring, C4 189; 20 II 327; LPJC 264; OA 419; LP 986

In every trifle somthing lives to please, A40 118; A54 375; 17 107; T II 143; RM 146; MC 424; MP IV 244

In fancys eye what an extended span, A12 13; A13 41; VM II 182; T I 272; L 169; EP II 487

In friendships gentle name that claims akin, A54 346; MC 392; MP IV 166

In his countrys cause when his last breath is breathing, A3 53 etc; A40 31; B1 109; 1 178, 179; EP I 248

In infancy we share the joy (fragment), A39 28

In Jacob he hath not seen evil or guile, LP 105; C 27

In langley wood the oaks are low, B7 36; MP II 8

In lifes first years as on a mothers breast, A9 R24; VM II 130; T I 225; LC 26; L 104; EP II 409

In love's green spring the very name (fragment), A59 82; B6 R94

In massy foliage & a sunny green, A40 30a; A54 353; B5 21; T II 132; RM 115; MC 400; MP IV 188

In midst of happiness we meet despair A50 R52; B9 R14; MP II 229

In my own native field two fountains run, A57 R86; T II 297

In my young days I pluck't a rose, 20 I 6; LP 275

In one accord they shout with anxious breath, A6 39; EP I 461

In politics and politicians' lies (from 'The Parish'), PCFM 87; X 204

In purple clouds the even comes, A9 11

[In schoolboy days, as on a mother's breast: see In lifes first years as...]

In Scotaland there's a bonny place, 20 II 317; LP 976

In shades obscure & gloomy warmd to sing, A11 10a; B2 274; EP II 382

In sooth it seems right awful & sublime, A40 51a; A54 348; B7 20; T I 534; TSP 138; RM 111; MC 394; MP IV 172; JCSJ 16 12

In summer showers a skreeking noise is heard, B9 98; T II 342; BP 119; JCB 18; NS 44

In summer time the little rest of care (fragment), A13 4

In suns and showers luxuriant may came forth, A57 48; MaC 3; T II 283

In that rude desolate flat when winter floods, A54 411; A57 26; MC 462; MP IV 312

In the bloom of June arrayed, C4 283; 20 II 384; LPJC 272; LP 1037

In the breezes I seem, MP II 326

In the cowslips peeps I lye, 20 I 344; Ch 200; AS 172; T II 447; PJCM 160; JR 123; JC [1]; LC 64; WS 73; TSP 315; X 91; SPP 199; CC 38; OA 391; GS 343; LP 611

In the field where the Nettle burdock and Sowthistles, C3 345; 20 II 174; LPJC 226; LP 839

In the gloaming o' moonlight so soft and so dreary, 20 I 400; LP 661

In the greenness and freshness of may, C4 83; 20 II 269; LP 927

In the hedge I pass a little nest, A59 72; BN 17; OA 242

In the meadows silk grasses we see the black snail, 20 I 342; Ch 202; AS 162; T II 485; LP 609

In the mountains o the West, C3 383; 20 II 193; PJCM 196; LP 858

In the seasons o' swallows that brings the bright sun, C3 45; 20 II 24; LPJC 200; LP 688

I' the springs morning dews, C3 1; 20 II 1; LP 665

[In the summer health and dew: see In this summers health & dew]

I' the sunshine o' the Season i' the spring time o' the year, LP 265; L 671

In The War Days Of Shamgar Of Anath & Jael, 8 34; LP 109; C 13

In the white thorn hedges the blackbird sings, C3 349; 20 II 176; LPJC 228; OA 408; LP 841

In this cold world without a home, 6 57; PJCM 101; GG 207; LPJC 67; X 151; OA 306; LP 74; C 122

In this summers health & dew, C3 87; 20 I 56; 20 II 49; 415 1; LP 335

In thy wild garb of other times, A30 156; A31 160; A54 150; B7 R11a; T I 382; SPP 166; RM 59; MC 160; OA 181; GS 83; PM 27 & 25; E 12; MP III 363

In touch wood trees it taps for food, MP II 177

Insects & flowers creations scattered tribes (stray couplet), MP II, 150

Infants are but cradles for the grave, 19 6; LP 165

Infants graves are steps of angels, where, 20 I 2; Ch 139; AS 173; NG 144; T II 466; PJCM 120; GG 212; TSP 285; X 197; LP 271; GS 272

Is love a flower to bud then bloom, 20 I 219; PJCM 151; X 145; LP 500; K 73

Is loves gold ring been broken, C3 253; 20 II 129; LPJC 217; LP 794

Is may to bloom without thee, 20 I 166; PJCM 146; LP 455

Is nothing less than naught--nothing is nought, C4 391; 9 10; 20 II 449; PJCM 192; LP 250

Is poesy dwelling in a nice culld sound, MP II 239

Is pride thy hearts desire? (The Vanities of Life), X 198

Is there a hope <____>, MP II 274

Is there another world for this frail dust, A22 5; A40 73; A54 393; AS 123; T I 522; MC 442; MP IV 279

It chanced as in dog days he sat at his ease, A18 261

It did delight me--& delights me still, A40 190; A54 192; MC 206; MP III 464; K 33

It does me good, thou flower of spring, LP 8

It feeds on falshood & on clamour [or clamour and on falsehood] lives, A41 49; A54 365; F1 1; T II 110; RM 130; MC 413; MP IV 220

It gives a pleasant view when arches stride (fragment), A57 36

It hides the future & leaves room for hope, A54 389; T I 523; GG 117; MC 437; MP IV 270

It is a gloomy thing to think that fame, A31 53; B3 53

It is a lonely place indeed, B9 55a; NS 21

It is an happiness that simplest hearts, A54 424; B6 51; MC 478; MP IV 332

It is of God's mercies we are not consumed, Bod. MS Don.a.8, f. 1v (ClJ 160)

It is love, C3 321; 20 II 164; TSP 332; LP 829

It is the evening hour, 20 I 20; MaC 76; T II 498; PJCM 128; GG 217; TSP 294; LP 291; OA 341; W 190; GS 275; B 99; K 74

It is the silent hour when they who roam, 20 I 106; TSP 301; OA 358; LP 389

It makes a nest with much ado, A46 188; A47 19; MP II 176

It may be said the plains are 'paved with love' (stray line), MP II 106

It surely is a pleasant thing, A47 1; MP II 163

It thunder's loud--the clock struck nine, A6 26; C2 28a; 1 12; 4 4; EP I 21

It was a pleasant Evening the bee had gone to rest, C3 351; 20 I 338; 20 II 177; PJCM 193; LP 842

It was in winter hoar, LP 255

It was not thus in days gone by, B3 80; MP II 254

It was on a summers morning, C4 181; 20 II 322; LPJC 265; LP 981

It was once upon a certain time, A35 R24

It was one April morning, C4 183; 20 II 323; LP 982

Its just upon the eve of May, 20 I 239; LP 515

I've been gathering, 20 I 179; LP 468

Ive been roaming in the gloaming, 20 I 174; LP 464

I've been tracing valleys fair, B4 52

Ive drank to thee when at the brook, MP II 247

I've felt a pleasure aye an inward joy, A51 23; B8 91; MP II 289

I've felt a pride to speak thy name, A34 3

Ive felt the loneliest pictures in my mind, A40 194; B8 110; T II 122; MP IV 588

I've got an ould crimmocking Cow, C3 395; 20 II 199; LP 863

I've had many an aching pain, 20 1 9; LP 279; V 165

Ive heard thee sing of plaintive things, T II 210

Ive left my own old home of homes, A48 30; A54 201; A58 13; B8 51; AS 123; T II 251; GG 157; SPP 176; RM 147; MC 216; OA 250; JCSJ 5 (1986) 7; GS 198; CK 87; E 69; MP III 479

Ive listened as [or 'when] to school Ive gone, A47 27; A53 11; T II 230; BP 72; JCB 87; MP II 184

Ive long been urgd friend for to write ye a Letter, 1 219; EP I 302

Ive long been wishing for thee lonely spot, A29 R184; MP II 40

Ive loved thee Swordy Well and love thee still, A54 339; 17 60; AS 122; T II 144; TSP 195; MC 383; GS 82; MP IV 144

Ive met the winters biting breath [from 'The Approach of Spring'], L 223

Ive none to love and none to fear, 20 I 91A; T II 520; LP 373

Ive often gazed with pleasure at the edge, A57 R94; B6 26; Pfz Misc 198; T II 300; JR 89; MP IV 579

Ive often had hours to be meeting the lasses, B2 148a; B4 R93; EP II 88; K 19

I've often known a rural charm, 1 127

Ive often on a sabbath day, A54 263; SPP 157; MC 284; B 55; MP III 573

I've often sought on sabbath days, A57 7; B6 71

Ive often thought me that a king should be, A54 297; B8 35; MC 446; MP IV 288

I've often tried when tending sheep and cow, T II 381; PJCM 55; JR 102; BP 123; LP 35

Ive ran the furlongs to thy door, A59 40; SPP 41; OA 261; GS 133

Ive riches in plenty & if Id no fee, MP II 256

Ive seen it raise its copple crest, MP II 178

Ive seen that bosom melt to trace, A37 52; A50 R38; A51 67v; 17 162; MP IV 375

I've seen the midnight morrice dance & play [or 'of hell'], A48 7; B4 74; T II 55; MP II 187

I've seen the river flowing, C3 413; 20 II 210; LP 872

I've seen the summer morning, 20 I 360; LP 626

I've waited [or watched] long lonely but hither she comes, C3 415; 20 II 212, 219; LP 874

I've wandered many a weary mile, 6 1, 6; 8 23, 25; 137; T II 392; PJCM 99; GG 206; LPJC 38; LP 43; OA 281; JCSC 48; C 56

 

 

Jane summer is with thee thy fancy may chuse, C4 191; 20 II 329; LPJC 265; LP 988

Jane why dont ye love Jane, C4 303; 20 II 396; LP 1048

Jenny my darling this instant awaken, B2 232; EP II 277

Jockey said to Jenny 'say will ye marry me', C4 301; 20 II 395; LP 1047

Joy blooms precarious like to summer flowers, A46 51; A50 R57; MP II 237

Joy like a summer shower sudden and brief (fragment), A31 12; A42 103; A48 26; B4 73

Joy makes a heart compa[n]i[o]n out of none, A59 94; B6 74; NS 12

Joy treads on flowers but time devours, MP II 318

Judge not, sweet maid, approaches bold, A37 53; MP IV 376

July the month of summers prime, B6 R139; SCVS 60; AS 66; T I 321; TSP 92; SC (July second version); MP I 109

June is a gladsome month that gaily comes, A31 R158; MP II 103

Just as mornings rosy lass, EP I 355

Just as the even bell rung we set out, A5 40; B2 251a; C2 42; 4 34; VM II 30; AS 26; T I 75; JR 5; LC 20; X 69; WS 45; OA 41; EP II 326

Just as the sun from his window did peep (The Moth & the Fairys), A40 52; B7 R47; VFHC; MP IV 358

Just at the early peep o' dawn, A3 96; B1 151; 5 106; PD 57; EP I 409; K 1

Just by the wooden brig a bird flew up, A46 130; A54 224; A56 R11; T II 220; BP 54; RM 80; MC 239; OA 230; W 141; GS 104; E 50; MP III 515

Just like [a] berry brown is my bonny lassie O, 20 I 371; Ch 159; AS 171; LP 634

Just like love is mans desire, 20 I 371; LP 636

Just like the lion in alarms, D10 1; 30 100; MP II 339

Just now I met a maiden, C3 315; 20 II 161; LP 825

Just oer the trees and uplands swelling height, C1 15a; 1 42; 4 92; EP I 70

Justice is slow, but sure as Moses rod, LP 263

 

 

Kate Kearney is bonny the queen o' ould Erin, C4 287; 20 II 386; LP 1039

Kind sir your reasons may be just, B2 147; EP II 85

King William, ye'r an honest man, B6 195

Kings may build palaces and thrones and halls (fragment), A50 R48

Knaves for every purpose seize on, A45 R46; MP II 152

Know God is every where, C3 431; 20 II 221; OA 410; LP 879

Knowest thou the time when wild goats breed, 6 52; LP 124; C 101

 

 

Lady sweet thy melody, A16 10; B2 216a; EP II 232

Lady tis thy desire to move, A35 9; A40 77; A54 110; T II 71; RM 36; MC 118; MP III 279

Lady yell excuse a clown, A40 51; 3 166; EP II 122

Ladybird ladybird where art thou gone, C3 189; 20 II 99; PJCM 181; GG 228; WS 74; OA 404; LP 762

Land of perpetual summer Italy, 19 3; LP 163

Language has not the power to speak what love indites, 20 II 358; PJCM 216; GG 232; X 210; LP 1015

Lapt up in sacks to shun the rain & wind, A61 52; T II 364; JR 100; NS 71

Lassie I love thee, 20 II 418; C4 341; Ch 157; LP 1068

Lassie say will ye go, C4 369; 20 II 435; LP 1084

Learning may polish up love wi fine feelings, A10 1; EP II 416

Leave me still then in a snug box declining (fragment), A10 1

Leave the door in peace man, A10 6; EP II 424

leave your throne / & reign oer ashes epitaphs & bones (fragment), MP II 335

Leaves from eternity are simple things, A37 24 etc; A52 5; A54 231; B8 87; 7 11; T II 12; JR 43; GG 132; SPP 109; TSP 181; X 121; RM 50; MC 247; OA 165; GS 158; E 96; B 44; MP III 527

Left in the world alone, 20 I 107; Ch 192; AS 145; T II 522; GS 312; LP 390

Left now in the valley forsaken to languish, A11 6; EP II 458

Less timid now in many a flock, MP II 193

Let brutish hearts as hard as stones, B2 213a; VM I 165; EP II 225

Let churchs & chappels shrill your anthemns crye, EP I 357

Let malice when Im gone belye me or condemn (stray couplet) MP II 13

Let us go in the fields love and see the green tree, 20 I 87; LPJC 168; LP 369; OA 354; GS 281

Life giveth all the means to live, A40 88; B7 R3; MP IV 404

Life is to me a dream that never wakes (The Exile), X 166

Life is--what?, EP I 394

Life rolls her millions on earth's ocean wide, A18 83; A50 R45; B9 R20; MP II 309

Life thou art misery or as much to me, A5 47; B2 208a etc; C2 47; 4 44; VM II 156; T I 130; EP II 316

Life was & is & still will be, A40 96a; B7 30; T II 206; MP IV 443

Life without the fear of death, 20 I 304; LPJC 194; LP 575

Lifes bud unseals in extacy & joy, A18 76; A21 10; A50 R47; EP II 521

Lifes current journeyed smooth with thee, A18 R35 etc; A29 86; A40 67; A54 117; B7 66a; MC 126; L 307; MP III 296

Lifes just like a poesy its colours are rare, MP II 248

Lifes monitor & fear inspiring friend, A35 19; A40 56; A54 342; T I 530; MC 386; MP IV 152

Life's passing bell wakes not a deeper sigh, A50 R46; MP II 236

Like a meadow mist the smoke (fragment), A59 74

Like a thing of the desert alone in its glee, A53 89; A54 322; D16 1; T II 89; RM 100; MC 361; MP IV 119

Like as high tempests, reckless whom they harm, B9 R26

Like boys that run behind the loaded wain, T II 312

Like children running races who shall be (fragment), B6 82

Like idle shepherd bending oer his hook (stray couplet), MP II 107

Lilies agen peep out above the floods (fragment), A21 17

Little trotty wagtail he went in the rain, C3 75; 20 II 42; Ch 179; AS 173; T II 447; PJCM 182; JR 123; LC 65; WS 61; TSP 315; X 101; BP 137; CC 11; LP 705; OA 401; GS 343; E 55

Live on thou spirit of departed years [from 'The Rural Muse'], L 268

Lo! Autumn's come--wheres now the woodlands green?, 1 37; EP I 62

Lone lodge in the bend of the vally farwell, PD 104; EP I 365

Lone occupiers of a naked sky, A54 421; B6 32; T II 241; BP 92; MC 475; OA 208; MP IV 328

Lonely oer the heaths to ramble, A40 47a; B2 133a; UBS (June 1937) 67; EP II 58; GS 380

Long as bees fly to seek the rose, 20 I 381; LP 646

Long curst the luckless day that saw me born, 7 43

Long have we parted been, C4 41; 20 II 247; PJCM 203; LPJC 244; LP 904

Long, long in cold suspense care's fate may lie (fragment), A50 R48; A51 115

Long Spain in haughty wise, A40 87a; B4 22, MP IV 96

Long sweeping bends of croppings brightning green, A11 5; 3 166; EP II 120

Look at the wonders man hath left behind (fragment), A37 54

Look on this dust the living and the dead, 20 I 83; LP 364

Look theres two splendid feathered things, A46 140; A47 10; T II 226; WS 65; PL 64; MP II 170

Look through the naked bramble & black thorn, 19 67; OA 334; LP 199

[Look where two splendid...: see Look, there's two splendid...]

Looks kin to mortal hoary nature wears (deleted fragment), MP II 109

Looks will speak when hope's declining, A28 10; A40 58; B4 69; MP IV 381

Lord Bateman was a noble lord, D25 163; FT 189; MP II 282

Lord hear my prayer when trouble glooms, PJCM 102; LPJC 160; LP 137; OA 327; GS 266; B 94; C 129

Lord, if they do but smell ye out, B6 171

Lord, keep me from all evil ways (fragment), A59 83

[Lord loved the happy cows...: see Loud lowedthe happy cows with udders full]

Lost on the wild to the storm's biting breath (fragment), A5 12

Lost to all pleasures when pleasure can please me, EP I 493

Loud is the summer's busy song, GG 90

Loud lowed the happy cows with udders full, B8 75; CT 125; MP I 277

Lov'd Myra, if these humble strains (fragment), A3 94

Love & thy vain employs away, A40 63; A54 130; B3 48; B7 63; Ch 296; AS 133; T II 191; MC 140; L 342; MP III 323; K 38

Love can melt the stony hearted, A59 93; MaC 74; T II 268

Love hasten on thy Sunday gown, A59 36

Love hearken the skylarks, A59 67; B6 105; SPP 39

Love is a dreamer full of happy things, A37 42; B7 67; MP II 111

Love is a secret, 20 I 8, 69a; MaC 78; T II 471; GS 272; LP 278; K 75

Love is a subtle gossip, A40 85; B7 28; MP IV 398

Love is life's spring,--the summer of the soul, 20 I 92; PJCM 118; TSP 283; LP 374

Love is past and all the rest, 20 I 391; LP 655

Love is the immortals souls delight, C4 159; 20 II 310; LPJC 261; LP 969

Love is the mainspring of existence it, T II 386; JR 104; C 42 [from Child Harold]

Love is the manna youth's fond heart esteems (fragment), A31 14

Love lives [or lies] beyond [the tomb], C3 83; 20 I 121; 20 II 46; Ch 239; AS 175; NG 147; T II 469; PJCM 126; GG 215; TSP 290; X 146; LP 406; OA 363; GS 313; JCSC 49; E 60; B 108

Love looks on beauty often as a toy (fragment), A42 103

Love meet me in the green glen, C4 153; 20 II 306; T II 489; PJCM 209; WS 86; OA 418; LP 965; B 124

Love oft in anger meaneth to be kind (stray couplet), MP II 12

Love speaks ten angry words & means not one (stray line), MP II 128

Love speeds on wings of ecstasy (fragment), A48 11

Love though it is not chill & cold, A29 R185; A54 284; 17 141; NG 123; T II 77; RM 64; MC 313; MP IV 31

Love, turn aside those carless ways, 30 99; Literary Souvenir (1826) 410

Lov[e]ly bud wi' many weeds surrounded, B2 207a; T I 281; EP II 212, 611

Lov[e]ley insect, haste away, C1 25a; 1 86; 4 112; VM II 63; AS 41; T I 42; EP II 21

Lovely Mary when we parted, 6 11; 8 67; PJCM 100; LPJC 46; X 151; OA 288; LP 52; C 68

Lover of swamps, A57 R104; B6 15; Pfz Misc 198; T I 377; GG 101; TSP 108; SPP 69; BP 27; JCB 81, 92; OA 205; W 109; GS 111; B 69; MP IV 574

Loves [a] flower of tempting blow, A16 14; B2 223; EP II 249

Loves first warm gushes still their charms reveal, MP II 31

Love's memories haunt my footsteps still, C4 98; 20 II 277; PJCM 207; LP 935; V 181

Loves recollections is like the spring morning, A10 3; EP II 420

Love's troubles all are childish things, A40 86; MP IV 401

[Lovly, Lovley: see Lovely]

Low in cool purple sinks the sultry day (fragment), B6 147

Luckless day the sorriest tidings, A40 43a; B2 251a; C2 41; 4 32; EP II 325

Lucy bonny Lucy Brown, C3 71; 20 II 40, 60; LP 702

 

 

Maid of Jerusalem, by the Dead Sea, 20 I 27; T II 453; PJCM 113; X 201; LP 299; JCSJ 4 25

Maid o' the wilderness, C3 279; 20 II 43; Ch 143; AS 166; T II 480; LP 807

Maid of Walkherd, meet again, T II 382; PJCM 56; TSP 238; LP 18; GS 211

Maiden dearest, leave me a smile, 20 1 97; LP 379

Maiden the blooms of happiness surround thee, A54 347; MC 393; MP IV 171

Maiden unknown let me worship before thee, 20 I 177; LP 466

Maiden with that sunny brow, 20 I 366; LP 632

Maiden with those ivory shoulders, C4 23; 20 II 238; LP 895

Maids rail at whores--as whores chaste maidens blame, A3 107

Maids set their buckets down & run the while, A61 130; NS 110

Maids shout to breakfast in a merry strife, A61 127; T II 356; JR 98; NS 108

Majestic pile thy rich & splendid tower, A27 12; A40 121; A54 360; T II 112; RM 136; MC 408; MP IV 207

Malicious insect little vengful bee, B2 267; C1 6; VM II 163; T I 262; EP II 364

Man earths poor shadow talks of earth's decay, A40 193; B8 R12; T II 108; RM 128; MP IV 568

Man in that Age no rule but Reason knew, EP I 513

Man is an insect, life his cell, A40 89a; B7 6; T II 204; MP IV 408

Man lives in trouble and hope leads him still (fragment), A58 6

Man, nature all upbraids thee, A18 87

Many are poets--though they use no pen, 6 4 etc; 8 3 etc; PJCM 73; GG 179; LPJC 35; TSP 239; LP 40; OA 279; W 183; GS 222; B 79, 86; C 36 [from 'Child Harold']

Many years in a cottage of mud, EP I 381

March month of 'many weathers' wildly comes, A18 R15 etc; A19 21; A20 56; SCVS 27; T I 302; SC (March); MP I 36

March wakened in wildness, A41 67; A54 141; MC 151; MP III 347; K 50

Mary Ann Abbot, 19 103; PJCM 141; LPJC 143; LP 222

Mary Appleby come now the spring is here fairly, C3 63; 20 II 34; LP 698

Mary fate lent me a moment of pleasure, A40 44a; B2 145; EP II 81; K 20

Mary I dare not call thee dear, D2 6; EP I 470

Mary, I love to sing, 20 I 95; Ch 193; T II 429; PJCM 119; X 148; LP 376

Mary leave thy lowly cot, A40 47; B2 130a; PCFM 54; T I 259; EP II 51; X 169

Mary let us Love employ: see Mary now let us love employ

Mary Mary charming Mary, B2 131; B4 R92; EP II 52

Mary my wife the summer is come, 20 I 230; LP 508; K 76

Mary nature loves thee Mary, A18 73; A48 23; MP II 196

Mary now let us love employ, A39 20; A40 103; A54 273; T II 75; RM 58; MC 297; MP IV 3

Mary on the footpath ramble, 20 I 231; LP 508

Mary sweet Mary the spring is returning, 20 1 223; LP 504

Mary the day of loves pleasures has been, A9 R19; VM II 140; T I 258; EP II 408

Mary, thou ace of hearts, thou muse of song ([from] 'Child Harold'), X 155

Matchless the maid whom I so highly prize, C1 15; 1 40; 4 91; EP I 68

May reach the chamber indow with his hand (stray line), MP II 151

Maytime is in [or to] the meadows coming in, A40 175; A54 184; T II 20; JR 51; SPP 16; MC 198; OA 120; GS 52; E 11; MP III 450

Me it delights in mellow autumn tide, A40 90a; A54 347; B7 14; AS 126; T II 146; MC 393; MP IV 169

Me not the noise of brawling pleasure cheers, X 63

Meek evening comes, but not as wont she comes, A31 22; 17 108

Meek evening comes, the landscape fades away (fragment), A39 28; B6 R229; B9 R28

Meet me in the primrose lane, C3 3; 20 II 18; PJCM 168; LP 682

Meeting love--its namless joys, A5 51; B2 253a; C2 42; 4 33; EP II 330

Memory and Time, disciples unto fame (fragment), A18 76; A50 R38

Memory in every place her tidings brings (fragment), A51 115

Memory thou soul of time which passing years, A23 4; A28 30; A30 16; B8 R38; 17 10; EP II 533

Mem'ry thourt kind banishd bliss to endear it, B2 121a; B4 R91; EP II 33

Men kings in storms securing power by strife (stray couplet), MP II 243

Merry bird, and surely thou, A40 39; MP IV 357

Midnight broods dismal in the sobbing woods, A53 99

Midsummers breath gives ripeness to the year, A37 R18; A54 381; B8 59; MC 430; GS 148; MP IV 255

Mild health I seek thee whither art thou found, A53 57; MaC 83; T II 115; MP II 250

Milton sung Eden and the fall of man, 7 27; C 55 [from Don Juan]

Mirthful summers come at last, C4 357; 20 II 427; LP 1077

Mockery sits on Salem's throne, 20 I 98; LP 380

Modern love like to traffic turns all upon gain, A3 102; A40 32a; B1 161; 1 247; EP I 344

Moreover God answered Job & said, 6 53; LP 126; C 107

Morn comes again the dark melts into grey (fragment), A57 9; T II 301

Morn with her sober shadows tall & thin, A54 435; A57 62; B6 63; T II 321; MC 491; MP IV 351

Morning awakes sublime--glad earth & sky, A40 72; A54 392; T I 519; MC 440; L 246; MP IV 276

Muse, art thou in the noisy crowd (fragment), A57 R73

Muse of the fields oft have I said farewell, A27 1; A40 60; A54 3; NG 82; T I 449; JR 34; TSP 129; X 133; RM 27; MC 3; OA 104; MP III 9

Muses no more what ere ye be, A3 127; B1 163; EP I 432

Musey heres luck wi ten times ten, B2 130; EP II 50

Musing beside the cracking fire at night, A23 12; A40 39a etc; A54 344; B4 70; T I 517; LC 37; TSP 136; RM 109; MC 390; GS 45; MP IV 161

My ain heart love is thine, C4 263; 20 II 371; LP 1025

My Anna summer laughs at mirth, A18 71; A41 42; B4 R59 etc; PCFM 86; T I 423; JR 23; X 112; MP II 143

My Betsey dear my early love, C4 217; 20 II 345; LP 1003

My blossom is a young thing, C4 71; 20 II 262; LP 920

My bonny Ann Sharp, 19 110; LPJC 140; LP 218

My bonny blooming Oundle lassie, 19 49; LPJC 119

My bonny handsome gipsey girl I've loved thee long and ever shall, C3 243; 20 II 124; LP 789

My bonny Mary Ann, 19 38; LPJC 112; LP 181

My bonny Sue if love be true As I suppose you to be, C3 205; 20 II 104; LP 768

My bonny young Mary the maid o' the plough, C3 197; 20 II 102; LP 766

My brains, God know, as lin'd wi' leather, B2 138

My buxome young Lassie my bonny young Lassie, C4 43; 20 II 248; LP 905

My dear Lucy Mary my sweet Lucy Mary, C3 43; 20 II 23; LP 687

My dream began in bliss & lifted high, A18 R48; A29 79; A31 41; B6 R50; T I 404; GG 109; MP I 332

My face turned pale a deadly pale (First Love, extract), GS 123

My first love was sweet as the musk rose or nearly, B2 125a; EP II 42

My heart my dear Mary from thee cannot part (fragment), A62 8; LP 104; C 107

My heart into a glow of rapture stirs (stray couplet), MP II 353

My heart is in Scotland, wi' nature sae grand, 20 I 10; LP 280

My home is not here it lies in the land, 20 I 158; LP 531

My home is thine and where thou art, 20 I 126; LP 411

My hopes they were blighted, A20 37

My journey feels refreshed with green delight, A54 412; A57 28; MC 463; MP IV 313

My love is as sweet as a beanfield in blossom, C4 139; 20 II 299; PJCM 208; GG 231; LP 958

My love is fair and bonny, 20 I 324; LP 594

My love is like a pleasant thought, C3 423; 20 I 353; 20 II 216; TSP 328; LP 621

My love is like the Gilliflower, C4 177; 20 II 320; TSP 336; LP 979

My love is like the white thorn tree, C4 175; 20 II 319; PJCM 209; LP 978

My love is tall and handsome, A40 97a; B7 87; 18 15; Ch 332; T II 159; FT 158; MP IV 452

My love she is bonny and sweeter than ony rose, C3 117; 20 II 67; LP 724

My love she was a Gipsey O, C3 239; 20 II 123; LP 787

My love she wears a cotton plaid, C3 283; 20 II 145; Ch 145; T II 505; X 179

My love she wears [or wore] a muslin cap and trim[m]ed wi' ribbons blue, C3 113; 20 II 66; LP 723

My love she's bonny hale and young, C3 127; 20 II 72; LP 729

My love thou art a Nosegay sweet, A52 2; B1 39; D4 11; PD 125; NG 36; EP I 484

My love thourt like yon morning bed, B2 213; MaC 67; T I 247; EP II 224

My love will talk in any place, A61 91

My lover forsook me and left me in grief (fragments), B9 87

My loves like a lily my loves like a rose, B1 42; D4 11; PD 126; T I 86; EP I 485

My love's like the lilies, 20 I 71; LP 351

My loving dear is very fair, C4 345; 20 II 410; LP 1070

My mamme does not ken, 20 I 202; LP 485

My master's smiles I always strive to shun (fragment), A31 34

My minnie told all to my Daddie at e'en, C4 343; 20 II 419; TSP 339; LP 1069

My mother will have it Im nought but a ninney, B2 131a; B4 R93; EP II 53

My name dear Calista alone might never hope to shine (stray couplet), MP II 255

My native fallow fields appear so fair (fragment), B5 65

My Native Village Native Fields, I 176; EP I 244

My old lover left me I knew not for why, 10 88, 97; PJCM 190; LPJC 160; LP 253; FT 200; GS 356

My old man is a tiresome knave, B7 22; FT 192; MP II 275

My partners jeer me all the May, A54 324; T II 175; MC 363; MP IV 122; K 29

My Peggy's a young thing my Peggy's a gay thing, 20 I 293; LP 564

My Phebe she is handsome wi back as white as milk, LP 245

My poems cast upon the worlds rude seas, MP II 308

My sighs spoke more than words that louder call (fragment), A42 103

My spirit lives in silent sighs, 20 I 164; T II 493; LP 453; K 77

My sweet Irish kitty, C3 17; 20 II 9; LP 674

My thought by day my dream by night (stray line), MP II 272

My thoughts are of thee Love though thou thinkst not of me, 19 91; LPJC 149; LP 288

My wish now's to sit in a cottage made snug, A3 108; B1 R173; 1 95; 5 124; EP I 131

Mysterious ruins, granite-like ye stand, B5 96

Mystery thou subtle essence--ages again, A37 54; A54 376; T II 110; RM 131; MC 425; MP IV 245

 

Nature ne'er fashions beauty for a mask (fragment), B5 66; Pfz. 198, 27 (ClJ 213)

Nature now spreads around in dreary hue, A18 1; A29 65; B7 61a; SCVS 83; T I 333; GG 91; TSP 99; CC 14; SC (October); MP I 137

[Nature that pauses nearly dumb: see From huddling nights embrace how chill]

Nature, thou inspire [or accept] the song, B2 126; VM I 70; T I 163; EP II 42

Nature unequal modelizes all, C1 24a; 1 81; 4 110; EP I 111

Natures calm beautys like to bosom thoughts (stray couplet), MP II 337

Natures sweet bard of Spring the sable bee, A21 23; EP II 522

Nay, laugh at moles and dreams, I think it well (fragment), A50 30; Pfz. 198, 47 (ClJ 215)

Near a grove of tall trees stretching far oer the pool, A3 105; A40 33; B1 162 etc; 1 190; EP I 263

Near peas field hedge where pinks & linnets sing, B9 100; NS 45

Neath bramble slopes to find as seat (deleted fragment) MP II 13

'Neath this ash planting spread beside the lane, A40 117a

'Neighbours and country men for once relieve, A3 83; B1 138; 1 92; 5 98; EP I 125; FT 52

News, like a gossip, not for want of wind, B6 79

Nigh Leopard's Hill stands All-n's hells, 8 21; GS 212; LP 37; C 35

Night goes and blushing morning opes her eye (fragment), A53; A57 11

Night hath the golden clouds defaced (fragment), A59 87

Night lies as fast asleep as innocence (fragment), A59 98; T II 67

Night like a feeling mother (fragment), A49 19

Night spreads upon the plain her ebon pall, B2 140; VM II 179; T I 270; EP II 71

No almanack for truth the old exceeds (fragment), A57 16

No change attends thy visits to the spring, A50 R47; MP II 9

No chilling fears nor trembling alarms, 1 220; EP I 303

No flattering praises daub my stone, A3 108; B1 R172; 5 111; PD 61; NG 17; T I 24; EP I 418

No grandeur here wi affections shew, A10 2; EP II 419

No hailing curry favouring tothers, 1 5; EP I 15

No matter how the strife begins, 20 I 277; LP 550

No more Blustery winter rages, LP 237

No need of the sculptor, in marble becasting, 1 8

No single hour can stand for nought, D20 1; 6 14; T II 384; PJCM 93; JR 103; LPJC 51; GG 204; X 149; SPP 194; OA 293; LP 58; C 82

No sort of learning ever hurts his head, A61 116; T II 347; JR 97; TSP 232; X 212; EF 117; NS 103

No syllable was utter'd (fragment), A51 3

No yard of earth that claims our daily toil, 41

None but true anglers feel that gush of joy, A54 429; A57 R85; MC 484; OA 197; MP IV 339

Not booted foplings when their cloaths misfit, EP I 512

Not on the feather bed nor the down pillow, A11 9a; B2 272a; EP II 378

Not with the mighty to thy shrine I come, B4 R83

Not with the nodding feathers modern pride, A5 12; C2 51; 4 52; EP I 453

Now almost hid in trees a little gate, A54 416; A57 32; T II 324; MC 468; MP IV 319

Now as even's warning bell, AS 47; T I 190

Now Autumn's come--adieu the pleasing greens, A3 73; B1 124; 5 120; PD 29; T I 22; GG 39; EP I 396

Now autumns sorrows meet the faded leaf, A40 37a; B1 59; EP I 549

Now came the river sweeping round the nooks, A54 412; A57 28; T II 322; MC 463; MP IV 313

Now come little Freddy, A18 50; A39 9; A48 20; MP II 194

Now come the balm and breezes of the spring, C 2: see also 'Many are poets'

Now comes the bonny May dancing & skipping, A20 1; A40 59; A54 357; D14 12v; T I 536; SPP 128; RM 133; MC 405; GS 49; MP IV 200

Now crowd the larks in swarms & as they rise, A18 86; A50 R45; MP II 225

Now day declines and morning shines again, 1 21; EP I 283n

Now dust gets laid by days of rain, A12 5; EP II 465

Now evening comes & from the new laid hedge, A18 66; A41 38; A54 361; B9 R12; T I 539; JR 37; SPP 105; RM 138; MC 410; OA 132; W 112; GS 91; MP IV 212

Now evenings rosey streaks--a ribbond sky, 19 16; LP 168

Now eves hours hot noons succeed [Cauper Green], A5 59; 3 191; AS 28; VM I 109; T I 174; EP II 180

Now forth the Poet rambles with the spring, A18 65; A27 19; A51 89; B4 136; B9 R12; 17 112; MP II 316

Now from the pasture milking maidens come, 32 29; LM (Nov 1821) 548; L 101

Now glareing daylight's usher'd to a Close, A3 16; B1 9; 1 134; 5 105; PD 143; T I 122; EP I 200

Now Granny's gone to bed Steal in a back way, C3 443; 20 II 228; LPJC 237; TSP 334; LP 886

Now grey ey'd hazy eve's begun, A3 65; B1 119; 5 52; LM (Mar 1820) 326; PD 21; T I 16; EF 29; OA 6; EP I 388

Now happy swains review the plains, C1 1a; I 120; VM I 186; T I 44; EP II 26

Now harvest smiles, embrowning all the plain, 7 49; C 84 [from Child Harold]

Now in the new-cut woods luxuriant shoots (fragment), A59 85

Now infant April joins the spring, SCVS 36; AS 62; T I 307; TSP 78

Now is past, the happy now, C3 261; 20 II 134; T II 503; JR 127; GS 342; LP 799

Now little book the time is come, A3 121; B1 1; EP I 424

Now many a dame dressed in their husbands' coats, D18 3

Now melancholly autumn comes anew, T II 393; JR 110; SPP 191; C 66 [from Child Harold]

[Now mournful glides this purling stream: see How mournful glides...]

Now my Country's glory come, Pfz. 197 (ClJ 219)

Now nature as a curtain stretcht about, A40 51; B2 244; C2 47a; 4 45; 175; EP II 306

Now night storms lull the peasants sleep (fragment), MP II 353

[Now once again, thou lovely spring: see & once agen thou lovly spring]

Now riddle this riddle my own bonny Mary, FT 80

Now sacred is their lowly bed, A50 R40; A51 78; MP II 222

Now sad oppression wears me down, B4 R82

Now sallow catkins once all downy white, A40 30; A54 352; B5 24; T II 119; SPP 72; BP 46; MC 399; OA 210; JCB 59; JCSJ 7 51; MP IV 185

Now sit they by the fire the merry folk, 17 162 etc.

Now slow the hazy mist retires, 1 175

Now sport the waterflyes with tiny wings, A54 429; MC 485; OA 198; MP IV 340

Now spring returns with all her wonted charms, EP I 267

Now spring returns with all the pleasing charms, 1 228; EP I 328

Now straying beams from day's unclosing eye (extract from 'Rural Morning'), LPL 5

Now sudden as a pleasure unawares, A54 415; A57 31; T II 323; MC 467; MP IV 318

Now summer cometh I with staff in hand, A40 59; A54 348; 17 61; T I 535; RM 112; MC 394; MP IV 173

Now summer is in flower & natures hum, A18 R43; A29 R125; SCVS 54; NG 65; T I 317; WS 23; TSP 88; OA 135; SC (June); MP I 75; B 29

Now swa[r]thy summer by [or which] rude health embrownd, A31 8; A41 15; A43 61; A54 55; AS 78; NG 89; T I 380; T II 6; GG 124, 130; SPP 145; TSP 110, 175; RM 31; MC 59; OA 124; GS 62; MP III 147

Now that the even is hanging so glooming, Oundle School (ClJ 31)

Now that the spring the quickening earth espouses, A40 92; A54 347; B7 15; T II 131; RM 111; MC 392; MP IV 167

Now that the year grows wearisome with age (St. Martin's Eve), A18 227; A40 144; A51 19; A54 104; T I 393; MC 112; OA 174; E 35; MP III 269

Now that the year is drawing to a close, A54 401; A57 R122; MC 451; MP IV 297

Now the aprils gentle showers, A5 R1; B2 246; C2 47a; 4 46; EP II 310

Now the bleak days of Easter wear away (fragment), A21 3

Now the cowslips in the grass, A59 40; B6 121

Now the day break is the east sky adorning, EP I 378

Now the meadow water smokes, A59 R79; T II 299; JR 88

Now the snow hides the ground little birds leave the wood, A3 74; B1 125; 1 91; 5 121; PD 30; T I 23; LC 15; TSP 8; BP 21; EP I 124

Now the spring's [a ]coming and wild b's 'r humming, C3 435; 20 II 223; LPJC 236; TSP 338; LP 881

Now the Summers in its prime, 1 240; EP I 336

Now the sun his blinking beam, AS 37

Now the sunbeams gin to blink, B2 249a; C2 50; 4 50; VM I 198; EP II 321

Now the wheat is in [the] ear And the rose is on the brere, C3 441; 20 II 227; Ch 149; AS 156; T II 481; PJCM 198; LP 885

Now the year's decline I love, 2 12

Now thou art gone the fairey rose is fled, A40 86; A54 350; AS 88; T II 106; TSP 193; RM 113; MC 396; MP IV 177

Now through the gaps of hedges green, A60 4

Now tolls the curfew from yon steeple tall, 1 158; 5 11

Now tracking fields where passenger appears, A54 415; A57 31; T II 323; MC 467; MP IV 318

Now winter in his earnest mood begins, A59 63; B6 77

Now winter paints its pictures at their hight (stray fragment), MP II 353

Now with the rivers brink he winds his way, A54 428; A57 73; MC 483; OA 197; MP IV 338

 

 

O a' the flowers o' scottish land, LPJC 131; LP 206

O aince I loved the lily, 19 59; LPJC 123; LP 195

O all the flowers o' Scottish land, 19 133

O autumn, doubly sweet is thy declining, A5 48; B2 208 etc; 4 44

O beautifull Sorrow, 19 54; LPJC 120; LP 192

O beautiful the wind comes And shakes the pleasant woodbines, C3 187; 20 II 98; LP 761

O beneath such raptures in my forgetful heart, EP I 353

O bonny is the bloom o' the rose on the brere, C3 393; 20 II 198; LP 862

O bonny is the lonesome flower, 20 I 165, 218; PJCM 140; X 87; LP 454

O bonney lass of harrow lea, EP II 448

O bonny Mary Featherstone she stole my heart away, C3 67; 20 II 36; PJCM 172; GG 226; LP 700

O Caradora bonny maid, C3 123; 20 II 70; PJCM 176; LP 727

O cease your idle prate ye swains, B4 R88; MP II 267

O Charming bird thy melody so sweet, 1 100; EP I 140

Oh chilly was the afternoon & slowly mov'd the rack, C4 114; 20 II 286; LP 944

Oh clear, sweet, and bonny are April's gay mornings, 20 II 257; LP 915

O' cold is the winter day And iron is the ground, C3 159; 20 II 84; LPJC 207; LP 744; GS 340

Oh come as it will come or come if it shall come, C4 161; 20 II 311; LP 970

Oh come i' the evening my own pretty dove, C4 151; 20 II 305; LPJC 259; LP 964

Oh come to him who loves thee best, C4 147; 20 II 303; LP 962

O come to me i' the evening, C3 57 etc; 20 II 38, 50; LP 709

O come to my arms i' the cool o' the day, C3 347; 20 II 175; LPJC 227; LP 840; GS 349

O come to the meadows my beautiful fair, 20 I 62; LP 340

O come wi' the music o' birds i' the bushes, C3 53; 20 II 28; LP 692

O' comely is the rosey brere That blooms among the thorns, C3 343; 20 II 173; LP 838

O could I be as I have been, 20 I 388; LPJC 193; LP 653; OA 396; GS 333; B 119

Oh, could I feel my spirits beat, A59 30; T II 262

Oh, could I see again life's morning sun (fragment), B3 94

O cou[l]d our childhoods happy spring, MP II 98

O cruel War when will thy horrors cease, 1 57; EP I 91

O cruel wars o bloody bloody wars, EP I 380

O days of youth to me are so dear, A7 27a; EP II 397

Oh, dear, sweet and bonny are April's gay mornings, C4 63

O dear to us ever the scenes of our childhood, 20 I 386; T II 478; LPJC 192; LP 651; OA 394; GS 335

O dear what fine thinkings beset me, A3 61; B1 113; 1 84; 5 145; EP I 115

O dearest, for a little while, A59 42; B6 149

'O Death were is thy victory! O grave were is thy sting', 1 209; EP I 295

O dinna paint her looks to me, 20 I 176; LP 465

O dismal disaster! O troublesome lot!, A3 101; B1 160; 1 32; PD 121; EP I 52

O Edinburgh Katy she bluims like a lily, 19 79

O Edinborough Katys a beautifull girl, 19 82; LPJC 152; LP 232

O Elenor! O Elenor, 20 I 340; LP 607

O Ellen, bonny Ellen, why so coy, C3 327

O endless bright in life & light, EP I 368

O even tide o even tide, A16 30; EP II 500; JCSJ 4 40

Oh fairest thing in natures bower, Pfz. Misc. MS 198 63; MP I 316

Oh faithless love Ive met thy scorning, Yale Osborn Collection (ClJ 73); YULG 31 (1956) 39; L 67

O false love is a bitter thing, A40 96; A54 303; B4 30; B7 21; 33 6; MC 336; L 387; MP IV 70

O far is fled the winter wind, A40 98; B4 35; 18 17; Ch 334; T II 161; GG 154; FT 102; MP IV 455

Oh, fare thee well, my own true love, B4 18; FT 83; MP IV 441

Oh, fearless as a cherub rest, A40 106a

O for a pleasant book to cheat the sway, A54 430; A57 18; T II 319; SPP 139; MC 485; OA 198; GS 87; E 22; B 49; MP IV 341

O for one real imaginary blessing, 19 101; LP 223

O for that sweet untroubled rest, 20 I 115; Ch 235; AS 146; NG 145; T II 525; PJCM 122; JR 133; TSP 287; X 139; OA 362; LP 400; B 110

O for the feelings & the carless health, A54 423; B6 51; T II 308; JR 90; SPP 104; WS 53; X 210; MC 477; OA 194; MP IV 331

Oh for the glow of Titian, C4 89; 2O II 272; LP 930

Oh, for the humble lot that ne'er embroils, A55 4

Oh, for the lot of those, A40 110; B5 44; B9 R10; MP IV 473

O for the quiet of an humble [or 'a heart and'] mind, 29 13; NS 3

O for the unshackled mood as free as air, A54 405; A57 R101; T II 305; MC 455; MP IV 303

O fortune, keep me in the country air, A57 15; NS 5

O fortune wiltu still unkind, C2 138

O freedom freedom sacred name, EP I 366

O friends and neighbours, pity and relieve, 1 60

O gentle star so placidly, A5 1; EP I 443

Oh, give me the hut in the midst of the wild, A59 41; B6 155

Oh, give my heart an honest song, B6 111

O God, methinks it were a happy life (fragment), H23

O good expression, delicately fine, C2 46; 4 42

O had I the wings o' the dove, C4 25; 20 II 239; PJCM 201; LP 896

O had we ne'er looed one anither, C4 313; 20 II 401; LP 1053

Oh! happy memories, what are ye, 20 I 18; LP 288

O happy spot how much the sight of thee, A5 11; B2 253; C2 51; 4 52; VM II 36; T I 76; EP II 329

O haud yer tongues ye sylvan elves, 20 I 264; T II 509; LP 538

O Hellen bonny Hellen why so coy, 20 II 167; LP 831

O Hellen Wright, O Hellen Wright, C4 17; 20 II 236; LP 892

O Home however homley--thoughts of thee [Home], C3 32a; 1 17; 4 13; VM II 149; T I 118; EP II 3

O how can I be blythe and free, 20 I 376; LP 641

O how cruel is the fuel, 20 I 334; LP 603

Oh, I could bear the rudest world to mock, A44 22; A57 49

O I do love to force a way, A54 259; B6 65; T II 51; MC 280; MP III 567

O I have been thy lover long, A21 53; LM (Feb 1823) 210; SCVS 234; T I 446; MP I 353

Oh, I have read of loves and sunny scenes, A31 145

Oh, I have wandered all astray, A39 19; A40 106; MP IV 470

O I love the bonny lassie, LP 243

O I love the dark eyes of the Jewish maids, 20 I 373; LP 639

O I love the dear wild and the outstretching heath, A57 54; B6 24; OA 145

O' I love the young and english rose, C3 95; 20 II 54; LP 713

O I sings the top name of all salleys, EP II 404

O I took the white hand of an innocent girl too, 20 II 331

O if the sorrows which true love inspires, 1 223; EP I 306

O Innoscence thou captivating charm, A3 100; A40 34; B1 159; 5 171; EP I 415

O it was a lorn & a dismal night, A30 87; A40 66 etc; A54 297; B8 R22; Ch 302; MC 328; OA 191; FT 146; MP IV 57

O jilting love thy sunny eyes, MP II 318

O Langley bush the shepherds sacred shade [Langley Bush], A16 14; B2 223; LM (Nov 1821) 542; VM I 164; T I 236; TSP 60; OA 30; W 54; EP II 250

O life thy name to me's a gauling sound, B2 246; C2 48; 4 46; VM II 158; T I 260; EP II 310

O Liza Dadford's like a pearl, C4 15; 20 II 235; LPJC 238; LP 892

O long I have fought for my country & king, A7 7a; EP II 396

O Lord God Almighty How Usefull Art Thou, GS 214; LP 39; C 3

O Love is so decieving, 10 102; LPJC 157; TSP 292; OA 338; LP 254

O love thou pleasing paining thing, A11 6; EP II 459

O love, what is love but a trouble at best, A59 39

O lovely Charming tender feeling maid, 1 205; EP I 293

O lovly maid tho thou art all, Pfz. 198, 63-4 (ClJ 349); SCVS 198; MP I 317

O Loves bonny Mary Green, LPJC 142

O Mary dear three springs have been, 6 17; PJCM 105; GG 208; LPJC 56; X 152; OA 297; LP 63; C 86

Oh Mary gentle Mary let us not disagree, C4 123; 20 II 291; LPJC 258; LP 949

O Mary in the silent hour, 20 I 65; LP 344

O Mary Neil is handsome, FT 159

O Mary sing thy songs to me, 6 10; 8 28; PJCM 93; GG 203; LPJC 45; X 148; OA 288; LP 51; C 62

O M[ary] thou that once made all, A23 13; A29 3; A30 114; B7 72a; SPP 1; CC 35; EP II 540; GS 126

O may I dare I breath a word, MP II 76

Oh me muther a'l'ays keeps running her rigs on, A8 R45; A40 47; B2 232a; EP II 278

Oh meet me to night by the bright starlight, C4 157; 20 II 309; Ch 170; T II 484; LP 967

Oh Molly Meeks! Oh Molly Meeks!, C4 119; 20 II 289; LPJC 256; LP 947

O much I love thee autumn sere, A50 R78; EP I 373; BN 65; JCB 61; JCSJ 8 44

O Muse bestow--nor think it vain, C1 13a; 1 37; 4 87; EP I 61

O muse--but here a most unlucky hair (fragment), D10 4; MP II 296

[O Mxxx, thou that once made all: see O M[ary] thou...]

Oh Nanny your face wears the hue of the morning, C4 247; 20 II 364; LP 1020

O native scenes for ever ever dear, B1 46; 1 216; PD 145; T I 123; EP I 300

O native scenes nought to my heart clings nearer, A5 61; B2 256; C2 49; 4 48; VM II 159; T I 260; EP II 336

O nature thou art sweet I oft did steal, A11 12a; EP II 464

O Nelly Giles o Nelly Giles, 19 112; LPJC 138; LP 216

O night o silent night how sweet thy boon, B2 140a; EP II 72

O now the crimson east its fire streak burning, B2 207a; C2 49a; 4 49; VM I 161; AS 45; T I 261; L 21; EP II 213

O once I had a true love And I loved her very well, C3 221; 20 II 114; TSP 310; LP 778

O once I had a true love, / As bless't as I could be, 20 I 384; AS 164; T II 482; TSP 317; X 184; LP 649

O once I loved a pretty girl and dearly love her still, C3 79; 20 II 44; Ch 180; LP 707

O once I loved a pretty girl / Which caused my heart to ache, 10 108; LPJC 158; LP 255

O once I loved a sailor well, C3 31; 20 II 17; LP 681

O Ope thy door--loud howls the wind, A16 1; T II 178; EP II 497

O open the door on thy william distrest, A7 33a; B2 123a; C1 5a; EP II 36; FT 142

O painted clouds sweet beauties of the skye, A16 R70; B2 216; 32 23; VM I 147; NG 47; T I 235; L 71; EP II 230

O' Phebe lovely Phebe meet me in the hills O' gorse, C3 227; 20 II 116; LP 781

O poesy is on the wane, A37 37 etc; A51 98; A53 49; A54 320; B8 111; NG 125; T II 80; SPP 182; RM 66; MC 359; OA 256; GS 205; E 76; MP IV 114

O poesys power thou overpowering sweet, A40 182; A54 194; SPP 79; CC 32; MC 208; OA 219; GS 155; MP III 468

Oh, praise Him, air and light and life (fragment), D3 4

O praise not love for suny smiles (stray line), MP II 334

Oh, put away thy pride (fragment), A51 48

O quiet living solitude, A57 R120

O riches from thy cruel scorning, I 189; EP I 261

O rural life thy simply pleasing charms, A11 1a; 3 165; Ackermann's Repository (Oct 1821); EP II 117

O rural muse, that erst did cull and bind, A31 R189

Oh saw ye my dearest, C4 297; 20 II 393; LP 1045

O say not love I too despise thee, A11 1a; EP II 452; JR 59

Oh says the linnet if I sing, B7 82; MaC 55; T II 100; LC 42; X 92; BP 39; MP II 285

O she did look so beautiful (stray couplet), MP II 269

O should these humble artles strains, 1 150; EP I 215

O sigh no more love sigh no more, A40 84; A54 310; B9 6; MC 346; GS 143; MP IV 85

O silly love, O cunning love, A40 54; B4 36; 18 10; Ch 326; T II 155; FT 110; MP IV 372

O simple nature how I do delight, B2 120; VM II 168; T I 265; JR 17; EP II 29

O sing not of the past, A35 6; A41 11; MP II 132

O soul enchanting poesy, A54 209; B8 37; AS 111; T I 433; JR 25; GG 141; TSP 120; X 123; SPP 116; MC 224; OA 153; W 99; B 36; MP III 492

O spirit of the days gone by, A31 45

O spirit of the wind and sky, 20 I 5; Ch 221; T II 463; TSP 320; LP 274

O still be thou blooming, the rival around thee, 1 121

O superstition terryfying power, 7 43; 11 58; EP I 285

O sweet are the smiles of my light hearted Phebe, 20 I 401; LP 662

O sweet is the song o' the Thrush i the spring mornings, C4 11; 20 II 233; PJCM 200; LP 890

O sweet is the sound O the doves clapping wings, C3 247; 20 I 394; 20 II 126; LPJC 217; LP 791

O sweetly wild & witching poesy, A8 1; B2 225; C1 9; VM I 146; T I 234; JR 16; L 23; EP II 255

O take me from the busy crowd, T II 383; PJCM 57; GG 177; X 107; LP 19; E 93

Oh, take this world away from me, A59 101; T II 263; X 111

O the bonny maple tree!, C4 73; 20 II 264; LP 921

O the day it was black when my love and I waited, C3 313; 20 II 160; PJCM 189; LP 824

Oh, the days are gone like a tale that is told, D22; JCSJ 3 18

O the evenings for the fair bonny lassie O, C3 169; 20 II 89; Ch 140; AS 167; T II 488; X 181; LP 751

O the first days of summer; morning's blush, 19 85

Oh, the gentlefolks of T_____, D23; JCSJ 3 19

O the milkmaid a beautiful flower, C3 299; 20 II 153; LP 817

O the moment was sad when I went from my true love, C3 29; 20 II 16; LPJC 198; LP 680

O the pleasures I do find, A5 42; A31 61; B2 254a; C2 40; 4 30; EP II 333

O the sweetest day that life lent me, Pfz. 198 52 (ClJ 32); MP II 146

O the voice of womans love, A40 110; A54 275; 7 87; 26; NG 112; RM 62; MC 301; MP IV 10; K 43

[O the world is all too rude for thee: see O this world...]

O the world keeps running round, 20 I 327; T II 498; LP 596

O then thou Eden of youth's golden years, 1 108

O there is a valley where I met pretty Sally, C3 295; 20 II 151; LP 815

Oh, there is comfort in a poor man's home, A55 3

O there is no other home but the old house at home, 20 I 286; LP 558

O there is one sweet dear thing, 20 I 158; LP 448

Oh, there was fear and beauty in her eye (fragment), D15 2; NS 3

Oh, there's a sweetness in a woman's voice (fragment), D18 8

O this world is all too rude for thee with much ado & care, A54 332; B5 39; B8 R114; NG 120; T II 76; RM 61; MC 372; MP IV 134; K 53

Oh, those were days indeed of joys, A46 R44

O thou bliss to Riches known, A3 75; B1 126; 1 226 etc; 5 149; LM (Mar 1820) 326; PD 33; AS 1; NG 3; T II 45; TSP 13; EP I 310

O thou mysterious past, from time set free (fragment), A42 103

O thou the heir of these domains, MP II 351

O thrice lucky town (the more lucky poor creatu'rs), 1 237; EP I 332

O throw aside those carless ways, A24 25; A31 112; L 248; EP II 580

O to look on the desart life left in its prime, MP II 317

O turn from sins sad gloomy road, B4 64; MP II 264

O welcome to thy cheering light, 1 230; EP I 328

O well I mind the morn was chill, C3 25; 20 II 13; PJCM 167; LP 678; K 78

O wert thou in the storm, 20 I 15; MaC 79; T II 460; PJCM 127; GG 216; WS 89; TSP 291; LPJC 165; LP 285; OA 340; GS 273

Oh, what a joyous dreamy scene, B4 126; MP II 268

'O what charming ringlets' cries Choe amazd, 1 23; EP I 39

Oh, when we look on pleasant things (fragment), A51 77

Oh where can he wander! Ah where can he stay!, C4 105; 20 II 282; LP 940

O where is one on earth, A39 22a; B4 R87; 17 100

Oh whither fair maiden so soon in the morning, C4 197; 20 II 332; TSP 337; LP 991

O who can paint the anguish of the heart, EP I 62

Oh who can tell the sweets of May-day morn, LP 266

O who can witness with a carless eye, A8 12; B2 266a; VM I 176; T I 237; LPL 7; EP II 363

O why was love sent here to kill, B2 209; EP II 216; JCSJ 4 38

O wilt thou go with me & seek for the spot (stray couplet), MP II 270

O winter, what a deadly foe, A3 131; A40 35; B1 164; 5 169; T I 19; JR 3; LC 14; TSP 7; X 208; EF 29; EP I 437

O with thy looks & feeling heart, C1 4a; 1 101; EP I 148

O Woman lovely woman how beguiling, 19 61; LP 196

O woman lovly woman--majic flower, A16 16; B2 224; VM II 191; EP II 251

O woman sweet witchingly woman, A9 R26; EP II 414

O worst of anguish in that aching heart, EP I 213

O would I were the little bird, A40 95a; A54 301; B4 31; MC 334; FT 100; MP IV 66; K 21

O would they meet some misery, 1 16

O wretched Man--Now hopes are fled & past, EP I 296

O yond expression delicatly fine, B2 247; C2 46; 4 42; VM II 195; EP II 313

Observe the flowers around us, how they live, T II 143

Och by jasus hes an irish lad, A46 11; MP II 156

Odd rot it what a shame it is, 20 I 237; LPJC 183; TSP 311; LP 514; V 175

O'er common fields the journey lay, 7 35; NS 50

O'er grass ground and plough'd fields now whistles the sky lark, C4 125; 20 II 292; LP 950

O'er Scotland's vales and mountains high, 20 I 194; LP 478

O'er the emerald meads I wandered, 20 I 382; LP 647

Oer the grey willows ruddy rose the sun, A18 78; B4 17; MP II 8

Oer the rich landscape with its emeral dye (stray couplet), MP II 252

O'er the smooth sward that dips the water's brim, A59 95; A60 13; NS 17

Of all the days in memoreys list, A5 62; C2 48a; 4 47; 32 38; VM II 46; T I 94; L 141; EP II 395

Of all the fine lasses Ive led down the dance, A40 42a; A54 279; B2 295; MC 305; FT 179; L 384; MP IV 21

Of all the jewels upon heavens breast, A37 44; D9 151; Pfz. 198 21 (ClJ 399); MP II 112

Of all the lads that meet at eve, FT 122

Of all the maids in scottish land Or lands ayont the sea, C3 153; 20 II 81; LP 741

Of all the swains that meet at eve, A40 38a; B4 41; Ch 338; T II 163; FT 121; 18 20; MP IV 355

Of all the trades in England a beggar's the best, A59 50

Of angling and the pleasures thence enjoyed, A57 64

Of thee I keep dreaming still thee, C3 415; 20 II 211, 218, 219; LP 873

Oft at this leafless season I delight, A18 205; MP II 10

Oft in my earlier days of leisure, A23 24; EP II 545

Oft peeping from his covert at the sky (fragment), A57 R83

Oft rosey lips my heart has taen, A11 7; B2 270; EP II 372

Old april wanes & her last dewy morn, B2 121; VM II 170; T I 266; EP II 31

Old Dobbin dead [or 'now'] I sing a mournful theme, C1 19a; 1 56, 61; 4 100; AW 86; EP I 84

Old Elm that murmured in our chimney top, A20 47; A41 59; A53 47; A54 180; B5 6; T II 18; JR 49; X 202; MC 192; OA 96; W 84; GS 167; E 79; MP III 440

Old English freedom is excessive free (fragment), B5 R62

Old fashiond uncooth measurer of the day, B2 249a; C2 50a; 4 51; VM II 162; AS 46; T I 262; EP II 320

Old favourite tree art thou too fled the scene, B1 47; C2 57a; 1 169; 4 65; PD 146; T I 124; EP I 239

Old January clad in crispy rime, A40 30a; A51 52; A54 354; B5 63; NG 140; T II 133; SPP 141; CC 66; RM 116; MC 401; GS 77; MP IV 190

Old noted oak I saw thee in a mood, A54 381; B8 29; T II 135; RM 121; MC 429; MP IV 254

Old stone pits [all] with [veined] ivy overhung, A31 20; A50 R37; A53 68; A54 366; B6 R229; T II 137; SPP 160; RM140; MC 415; OA 169; GS 80; MP IV 224

Old times forgetfull memories of the past, 19 122; LP 211

Old tree oblivion doth thy life condemn, A54 382; B8 33; MaC 4; T II 115; MC 430; GS 179; MP IV 256

Old tree thou art witherd--last year I did pass, A16 18; B2 224; VM I 151; T I 235; EP II 252

Old winters limpt off & left spring her enjoyment, 3 154; EP II 99

Omnipotent & mighty [or eternal] known unknown, A54 341; T II 104; RM 106; MC 385; MP IV 150

On a bonny April morning, 20 I 348; LP 616

On a fine sunday morning the house swep so clean, C2 27a; 1 11; 4 2; EP I 19

On a heath stood a farm house as lone as could be, A16 27; A40 48a; B2 217; 22 1; AW 88; EP II 233; CT 1

On chairs and tables clothes and dishes lie, 7 85

On Lolham Brigs in wild & lonely mood, A40 185; A54 370; T II 140; SPP 144; RM 143; MC 419; OA 193; W 134; GS 75; MP IV 234

On Martinmass Eve the dogs did bark, A40 94a; 18 11; Ch 328; PCFM 89; T II 156; FT 97; MP IV 436

On mole hill turfs by ivied woods, C3 421

On monday morning I married a wife, B7 86; FT 194; MP II 286

On mornings neath a dewy sky, A37 51; A53; MP II 116

On mossy banks the violets blue, C3 419; 20 I 350; 20 II 214; LP 617

On on they went nor paused in their pace (fragment), MP II 333

On Saturday night she was strewing her sand, B7 R18; EP I 526

On sunday mornings freed from hard employ (Rustic Fishing), A9 R21; VM II 99; NG 61; T I 213; JC [11]; LC 25; LPL 12; OA 74; EP II 642

On the banks of Inveraray 'neath the hawthorn's scented shade, A41 9; B4 44; FT 130

On the bleak hills o' Scotland my fancy reposes, 20 I 370; LP 635

On the eighteenth of October, C3 99; 20 II 57; T II 456; LP 715

On the return of April some few days, C3 235; 20 II 120; T II 405; LPJC 214; LP 784

On the rude heath yclad in furze & ling, A39 32; A40 7; A54 355; SPP 98; MC 402; GS 91; MP IV 194

On the seventeenth of April i' the good year forty nine, C3 135; 20 II 76; LPJC 204; TSP 329; LP 733

On this hill top Ill linger for awhile, A11 1; 3 165; EP II 118

Once I adored thee with that youth of heart (fragment), A22 1

Once in the merry toil of clipping time, A18 R37 etc; A29 R117; A31 1 etc; B6 1; SCVS 165; T I 483; CT 26; MP I 232

Once more o muse resume thy lowley flight, 1 212; EP I 297

Once more thou flower of childish fame, A30 12; B8 R44; SCVS 207; T I 352; MP I 323

Once musing oer an old effaced stone, C1 11a; 1 33; 4 83; VM II 150; T I 119; EP II 14

On[e] almost sees the hermit from the wood, A53 93; A54 432; T II 123; MC 487; OA 200; MP IV 345

One day accross the fields I chancd to pass, B9 96; T II 340; BP 117; OA 276; JCB 74; NS 43

One day when all the woods were bare and blea, A61 77; T II 336; WS 77; OA 268; NS 84; E 53

One Friday night the dogs did bark, B4 27; FT 97

One gloomy eve I roamd about, 3 163; VM I 120; AS 39; NG 44; PCFM 75; T I 255; GG 84; OA 47; EP II 114

One monday morning sour & loath, 1 252; EP I 352

One morn I wandered forth neath spirits high, A39 35; A40 109; A54 74; T II 68; RM 55; MC 79; MP III 196

One morn I went for walking's sake, A61 92

One Morning in summer two Boys went a tenting, 1 248; EP I 346

One morning to the village, A61 95

One oer heaths wandering in a pitch dark night, PD 151; T I 126; EP I 499

One summer Sunday morning The bells for Church did chime, C3 335; 20 II 170; LP 835

One summer's day in happiest mood, A40 198; B8 115; MaC 9; T II 101; JR 60

One summer's sunday morning / Just by the break of day, 20 I 356; LP 623

One well may wonder oer the change of scene, A28 R36; 32 60; L 214; EP II 600

One winters morn bent oer his propping stick, EP II 135

Oppress'd wi' grief a double share, C2 55; 1 162; 4 60; T I 70; OA 18; AW 106; EP I 228; W 38

Others in mixt alteration doubly blest, EP I 358

Ould Scotland's bonny woods and braes, C3 49; 20 II 26; LP 690

Our firesides easy chair, A35 7; A40 133; A54 67; 17 135; 30 96; MC 71; MP III 174

Our gallant speeches now are made, MP II 319

Our good ship the Charlotte for battle was bound, C3 179; 20 II 94; LP 757

Our years look behind us like tales that are told, A5 29; A13 3; 22 2; VM II 126; EP II 467

Out on such hellish thoughts, A31 25; MP II 77

 

 

Pain shifts its aching rest for ease in vain A25 R28; EP II 590

Pale sun beams gleam, 19 74; T II 404; TSP 284;; LPJC 129; OA 334; LP 203; B 100

Passion may a moment cloud, A60 1

Peggy said good morning and I said goodbye, C3 107; 20 II 63; T II 451; X 182; LP 720

Peggy ye might bin my death wi yer scorning, 3 160; EP II 110

Pendant oer rude old ponds or leaning oer, A37 39; A54 377; B8 R118; AS 128; T II 148; MC 426; MP IV 248

Peti[ti]oners are full of prayers, T I 420; B & B 415; OA 147; W 93; GS 172; E 81

'Pink pink' the bunting sings & picks its feather, D2 8; EP I 472

Pity, low bending, where the sufferer sleeps, 1 246

Pleased in his lonliness he often lies, A54 343; 17 7; T II 131; RM 108; MC 388; GS 90; MP IV 157

Pleasures fond phantasys their dreams supply, A49 35; A50 R38; A51 115; MP II 209

Pleasures lie scattered all about our ways, A54 407; A57 R83; MC 457; PM 35; MP IV 306

Ploughmen from their furrowy seams, 1 2

Ploughmonday as an holiday, MP II 11

Poaching, to which darker deeds belong, A46 150

Poesy now in summer stoops, A54 334; B6 102; MC 376; MP IV 140

Poet of mighty power I fain, A40 64a; A54 100; B3 22; Ch 286; AS 135; NG 154; T II 187; TSP 206; X 192; RM 80; MC 107; MP III 253

Poets & Poesy are aspirations, 19 65; LP 198

'Poets are born'--and so are whores--the trade is, 6 38; 7 27; 8 3; PJCM 64; LPJC 83; EF 126; LP 89; OA 318; W 167; GS 214; C 37

Poets love nature and themselves are love, 20 I 40; Ch 234; T II 516; PJCM 125; JR 131; GG 215; TSP 290; X 114; SPP 197; GS 277; LP 313

Poor nell let a gipsey drink out of her pail, A5 R6; B2 207; EP II 211

Poor outcast refugees of mother earth, A29 64; T I 531; MP II 34

Poor patient creature how I grieve to see, A23 11; A40 71a; A54 391; B6 R207; T I 525; RM 125; MC 440; MP IV 275

Poor strangers, look at them, these weary men, B6 R207

Poor wither'd harbinger of spring, C1 20a; 1 67; 4 102; EP I 96

Poor wretched girl as wretched as thou art, A11 3; EP II 453

Power thourt not worth a roasted onion, BL Eg. 2245, f. 9v (ClJ 258)

Praise cometh from thy tongue to me (fragment), D18 11

Prayers are the wings by which the soul doth fly, 17 109

Pretty Swallow once again, C3 77; 20 II 43; T II 445; WS 62; BP 134; OA 401; LP 705

Pride and oppression both shall have their end (fragment), A27 R22

Pride boasts and blusters in its little life (fragment), A27 R20; B9 R14

Primroses are in hedge rows peeping, C4 187; 20 II 325; LPJC 262; LP 984

Primroses in the woods appear, C3 229; 20 II 117; LP 782

Princess of months--so natures choice ordains, A54 358; T I 537; RM 134; MC 406; MP IV 202

Prone to mischief boys are met, 1 111

Push round that glass fill it up to the top, A8 R36 etc; EP II 401

Push that rough maple bush aside, 20 I 35; LP 307

Put on a dark and mournful veil, LP 241

 

 

Queen of the happy heart the laughing eye (fragment), B5 R75; MP II 272

Quiet & unobtrusive in the fame, 7 19; NS 47

[Q]uiet as glides the gentle brook away (fragment), A42 104

Quiet, let me live to love thee (fragment), A59 84

 

 

Ragwort thou humble flower with tattered leaves, A54 419; A57 39; MaC 8; T II 315; SPP 161; MC 472; W 154; MP IV 324

Rank poverty dost thou my joys assail [Poverty], C2 33; 1 17; 4 14; VM II 153; T I 120; EP II 3

Reader if undisguisd thou ownst a heart, 1 226; EP I 309

Reason uncheckt too high a pitch may reach (stray couplet), MP II 244

Receive the trifle as its meant to be, Elton Papers; L 680n5

Reformers of old England support a kingdoms claim, A40 111a; B5 19; EP II 593

Reforming men of England support your hardy name, EP II 590

Religion never more calm beauty wears, A40 57; A54 341; B4 135; T I 532; MC 386; MP IV 151

Religion ought to have a control, A42 56

Remember dear Mary love cannot deceive, C3 371; 20 II 187; LPJC 231; LP 851; GS 350; K 79

Remember thee love yes How can I forget [thee], C3 329; 20 II 167; LP 832

Rememb'rance paints the scene of backward days, C1 11a; 1 34; 4 83; EP I 55

Remind me not of other years, or tell, 7 55; C 58 [from Child Harold]

Rich beauty ne'er was made for thorny ways (fragment), A51 79

Rich healthiness bedyes [or 'hedges'] the summer grass, A37 27; A53 62; A54 400; AS 127; T II 147; MC 449; MP IV 293

Right cautious now his strongest line to take, A54 429; MC 484; OA 197; MP IV 339

Right famous bards in verses fine, A46 15; MP II 157

Right happy bird so full of mirth, A54 247; A57 R78; MaC 53; T II 293; BP 105; MC 265; OA 216; JCB 38; MP III 551

Right heavy hangs the wet and beaded flower (fragment), A57 12

Right is the man who builds his hopes on high, 20 I 173; LP 463

Right rosey gleamed the autumn morn, A37 41; A54 293; B7 65; T II 88; RM 99; MC 323; MP IV 49; K 30

Roaming the little path neath dotterel trees, A54 252; A57 38; T II 222; JR 74; BP 56; CC 20; MC 272; GS 101; JCB 70; MP III 558

Roaming [?while] the dewey field (fragment), Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge (ClJ 278)

Roll thee in my Lowlan plaidie, C4 367; 20 II 434; LP 1083

Rose in full Blown blushes dy'd, A3 109; B1 R173; 1 224; 5 135; PD 123; T I 24; EP I 307

Round Oak, though thy name is all, 18 32; MP IV 554

Rude architect rich instincts natural taste, A37 49; A54 400; B7 78; T II 136; RM 127; MC 449; MP IV 294

Ryhme is a gift as our folks here suppose, L 197; EP II 607

 

 

Sad was the day when my willie did leave me, A3 98; B1 158; 1 72; 5 112; PD 118; EP I 98; K 7

[Said snuffy nosed Benny: see How do my Kitty said snuffy nosd ben]

Sally Frisby's fair & bonny, 19 46, 52; LPJC 117; LP 187

Saluting then as one salutes a friend, 1 35

Sannazar was a fool when he exclaim'd, A6 21; EP I 458

Sannazar'o makes [or Sannazar supposes] Neptune to exclaim, A3 73; B1 124; 1 18; EP I 34

Satyr & Faun & Driad shadows all, 17 146; MP II 321

Sauntering at ease I often love to lean, A27 8; A40 56; A54 343; B4 R102; T I 533; RM 108; MC 388; OA 193; GS 148; MP IV 155

Say, Doctor M___, why and don't deride, 29 20

Say not when all your scanty stores afford, C3 429; 20 II 220; T II 462; LP 878

Say, prithee, what those frowns impart, A40 89

Say stranger did you see my love, B4 19; T II 176; MP II 256

Say What Is Love--To Live In Vain, 8 53; T II 385; PJCM 100; JR 104; LPJC 70; X 150; EF 125; OA 309; LP 78; JCSC 48; E 60; C 4

[Say, wilt thou go with me, sweet maid: see Wilt thou go with me...]

'Says Susan Prye to Dick 'my dear, MP II, 32

Scaped from his cottage threshold, see how wild, 17 8

Scenes of love and days of pleasure, 20 I 281; Ch 212; LP 554

Scenes of sweet feelings ye trees & ye bushes, A11 11; EP II 462

Secluded spots where boughs and leaves, A48 18; B3 77

See at yon flitting bird that flies, A47 22; A51 84; T II 237; WS 60; BP 85; MP II 179

See, there sit the swath summer lovers at play (fragments), A22 1

Sentinels proclaim the morning, B1 41; EP I 539

Serene she looks she wears an angels form, A16 68; B2 224a; VM II 192; EP II 253

Shades tho yere leafless save the bramble spear, B2 135a; VM II 177; T I 269; JR 17; OA 28; EP II 63

Shakspear the Glory of the English stage, 1 241; EP I 336

She calls me crazy, wild and mad (fragments), A11 1

She clings to that wild willing last embrace (stray couplet), MP II 251

She has an eye, oh, such an eye, A37 52; A50 R60; B5 79; MP IV 374

She hastens out & scarcely pins her cloaths, A61 74; T II 346; EF 116; NS 82

She is a sweet and bonny thing, LP 874

She runs away & holds no more [or 'gathers up' her gown, A61 119; T II 354; NS 105

She tied up her few things, C4 29; 20 II 241; MaC 47; T II 459; LPJC 241; LP 898; OA 412; GS 351; E 20

She turned her face upon the glass, A48 15; MP II 191

She walks in beauty and in light, C3 249; 20 II 127; PJCM 184; LP 792

She wept & sung while mornings came & went (stray couplet), MP II 332

Shepherd why is this complaining, 7 53; EP I 508

She's like the daisey on the hill, 6 7; LPJC 100; LP 166

She's lovely in her person And taller in her size, C3 225; 20 II 115; LP 780

Shineth the moon in silence now, C4 99; 20 II 278; LP 936

[Sibyl of months, and worshipper of winds: see Sybil of months...]

Simple enchantress, wreathd in summer blooms, A10 11a; 22 7; VM II 144; AS 43; T I 240; GG 82; OA 92; EP II 435; B 24

Since dissapointment & dispair, A3 49; B1 107; 1 227; 5 131; AW 83; EP I 325

Since Edward departed and lef me behind, C1 25; 1 85; 4 111; EP I 117

Since Flora distains me--her once loving swain, C2 33a; 1 19; 4 16; EP I 36

Since my love has left me I know not for why, 10 88, 97; FT 199

Since prayers and entreaties with Myra is vain, 1 170

Siren of sullen moods & fading hues, A27 5; A39 16; A40 102; A54 102; B4 49; B7 82; T II 3; JR 38; TSP 171; MC 109

Sketch Lolham brigs where strangers come & go, A61 5; NS 53

Sleep on dear baby thy mother leans o'er thee, 20 I 392; LP 656

Slighted love I little heeded, B1 43; EP I 542

Slow boiling up on the horisons brim, A2 R83; B2 128a; VM I 78; T I 167; LC 24; LPL 11; EP II 47

Smile again my lovely Lasses, 20 I 154; LP 441

Smile kindly love when we shall meet, 20 I 77; LP 358

Smiles hung about thy lips as loth to give (fragment), A42 104

Smiling in sunshine as the storm frowns bye, A27 12; A54 360; T II 113; RM 136; MC 408; MP IV 208

Smooth journeying from thy fountain home, B4 68; MP II 264

Snow drop I mourn thee oer thy early tomb, B1 57; EP I 555

So blushing under sweet sixteen (fragment), A59 74

So Christianitys enlivening light, EP I 351

So few the lonely journey stray, B9; NS 22

So fond hopes dwell on thee till every one (fragment), A42 103

So gay in summer as thy boughs where drest, 1 100; EP I 141

So in these pastoral spots that childish time (fragment), A51 64

So let us all be jolly, A62 4; LP 104; C 105

So moping flat and low our valleys lie, T II 298; JR 87; OA 146; PM 51

So now says he weegling how matters went wi im, EP I 507

So soon in the morning, love were are ye toiling, A10 17; EP II 447

So thy proud lily, haughty France, was torn, 17 68

So young, so beautiful, and yet to die (fragment), A42 104

Soft as the wind that stirs the down to flight (stray couplet), MP II 252

Soft blows the April wind my love, 20 I 312; LP 583

Soft falls the sweet evening, 20 I 199; LP 484; V 175

Solitude I love thee well, B2 256a; C2 36; 4 12; 22 4; EP II 338

Some blame thee honest Isaac--aye & deem, A18 59; A31 21; A41 30; A42 69; A54 360; T I 528; TSP 137; RM 137; MC 409; MP IV 209

Some childish memorys linger while were men, B4 1; T I 492; EP II 660

Some climb ambitions hill with many toils, A40 92; A54 77; B7 15; T II 301; MC 82; MP III 203

Some feed on living fame with consious pride, A18 6; A29 89; A40 66a; A54 350; B7 68a; MC 397; L 323; MP IV 181

Some keep a baited badger tame as hog, B9 66; OA 247; W 162; GS 121; NS 28; PR 83

Some little flowers shut up before the night (stray couplet), MP II 252

Some little things that trifles seem (fragment), B3 28

Some pretty face remembered in our youth, 20 I 403; PJCM 160; LP 664

Some promises are broke as soon as made, LP 252

Some sing about love in their season of roses, LP 9

Some stretch their necks & crow for fame, A16 65; EP II 511

[Some talk of providence...: see Folks talk of providence with heedless tongue]

Some two or three weeks before valentine day, A27 R26; A41 R79; A54 50; Ch 290; MC 52; VFHC; MP III 132

Some weet so little of this earthly truth, MP II, 247

Some with reform religion's shade pursue, 30 92

Song seems not worth the muse's care (fragment), A42 104

Soon as the elderns pethey branches bud, A20 62; MP II 21

Soon as the spring its earliest visit pays (The Widow or Cress Gatherer), A12 6; VM II 112; T I 219; EP II 652

Soon as the twilight thro the [or 'blue'] distant mist, A19 12 etc; VM II 67; PCFM 70; T I 207; OA 66; EP II 612

Soon the night in mantle dark, A59 76; T II 63

Sorrow is felt nor seen--the grief of verse, LP 206

Souls so distrest no comfort never knows, 1 25; EP I 42

Spontaneous flourisher in thickets lone, A54 422; B6 34; T II 327; MC 476; PM 19; MP IV 329

Spirit of the woods awake, EP I 359

Spring as a mother to a child returns (fragment), A21 19

Spring comes and every bush is clothed in green (fragment), D18 4

Spring comes & it is May--white as are sheets, 9 13; T II 401; TSP 281; LPJC 157; LP 250; OA 337; GS 359

Spring comes anew & brings each little pledge, A40 30a; A43 R92; A54 353; B5 21; NG 139; T II 132; JR 67; RM 116; SPP 163; MC 400; GS 81; MP IV 189

Spring cometh in with all her hues & smells, A31 20; A40 55; A54 346; RM 110; MC 391; GS 49; MP IV 165

Spring cometh in with pauses and delay, A18 81

Spring of life fare ye well I have tasted your sweetness, A9 R27; EP II 415

Spring sweets they are not fled tho summers blossom, 4 33; VM II 204; EP II 309

Springs flushing bud has opend into leaf, A10 6a; EP II 426

Spring's joys are universal and they fall (fragment), A21 21

Springs sweets they are not fled, though summer's blossom, B2 245a; C2 41a; LM (Nov 1821) 544; T I 281

Steal my sweet bessy from racket & dancing, A10 7; EP II 427

Stingo white frothing oer the polisht can, EP II 511

Stop Stranger! and thy tributary Tear, EP II 606

Stopt by the storm that long in sullen black (The Cross Roads or Haymakers Story), A12 1 etc; VM II 84; AS 17; PCFM 76; T I 455; EP II 619; CT 18

Streamlet thou hast known my love, A16 12; A40 43; B2 222a; EP II 248

Style varies like the fashions tawdry chaste, A40 57; B4 135; B9 R18; MP IV 380

'Such is the Almighty's Will' so spake the honest brow, PJCM 204; X 210; LP 910

Such splendid pomp the summers richness brings, A54 409; A57 21; T II 304; MC 460; MP IV 310

Sukey's rare and Sukey's fair, 20 I 251; LP 525

Summer is gone & all the merry noise, A25 R26; 17 17; MaC 21; T II 149; JR 69; LC 46; EP II 589

Summer is on the earth & in the sky, 19 32; OA 331; LP 177

Summer is prodigal of joy the grass, A54 413; A57 28; MC 464; MP IV 314

Summer morning is risen, 6 4; 8 3; PJCM 63; LPJC 35; X 108; EF 123; OA 279; LP 40; C 36

Summer now its lustre shining, EP I 339

Summer pleasures they are gone like to visions every one, A54 330; B5 51; B8 R119; AS 96; T II 257; JR 78; TSP 221; X 135; SPP 174; MC 369; OA 258; W 147; GS 195; JCSC 42; E 67; B 74; MP IV 130

Summer's in its glory now Sweet ane flower and green the bough, C3 199; 20 II 102; LPJC 211; LP 767

Sure t'was the murderers hand that laid thee low, A6 15; C2 27; 1 10; 4 1; EP I 17

Surely Lucy love returns, B2 151; VM I 100; AS 35; T I 244; EP II 94

Swallows check their rambling flight, 1 1

Swamps of wild rush beds & sloughs squashy traces, 3 155; VM I 105; AS 40; TSP 62; OA 46; L 65; EP II 100; PM 83

Swarthy yet lovly by each zepher fand, EP II 522

Sweet are the blossoms the summer adorning, A40 47a; B2 149; EP II 89; K 23

Sweet are the omens of approaching spring, B1 59; PD 147; AS 9; T I 124; GG 43; EP I 520

Sweet are the poets of the olden time, 17 44

Sweet blossoms of lifes happy spring, A25 5; EP II 581

Sweet bottle shaped flower of lushy red, B2 138a; VM II 178; T I 270; EP II 68

Sweet brook Ive met thee many a summers day, A23 R42; A24 15; A30 1; A40 73; A54 394; B8 R24; C4 87; Ch 304; T I 536; RM 126; MC 442; MP IV 280

Sweet chestnuts brown, like soleing leather turn, C4 87; 17 44; T II 415; PJCM 206; TSP 307; LP 928; OA 414; W 197; GS 358

Sweet come the misty mornings in September, T II 396

Sweet comes the morning, C4 65; 20 II 258; Ch 150; LP 916

Sweet days while God your blessings send, 6 12; 7 55; PJCM 106; GG 209; LPJC 48; X 153; OA 290; LP 54; B 80; C 76

Sweet fountain neeth thy pendant boughs, EP I 530

Sweet gem of infant fairy flowers, A10 2a; B2 277; 22 5; VM I 162; T I 230; JR 14; GG 81; TSP 58; X 206; EP II 391

Sweet glistning tear tho hung on emmas cheek, B2 248; B4 R90; B5 100; C2 52a; 4 55; EP II 315

Sweet in the garden blooming where none presume compare, A11 6; B2 269; EP II 369

Sweet is the Brompton Stocks perfume at eve, C4 331; 20 II 413; LP 1063

Sweet is the honey dew glazing the leaf, A18 76; A41 50; B7 33; MP II 147

Sweet is the light of thy bright eye, 20 I 146; PJCM 138; X 174; LP 433

Sweet is the mild snowdrop that comes in the spring, C3 69; 20 II 37; PJCM 173; LP 701

Sweet is the poesy of the olden time, A39 27; A40 56a; A54 356; B4 134; B7 R49; NG 141; T I 527; RM 118; MC 403; MP IV 196

Sweet is the violet scented pea, 20 I 307; Ch 207; AS 161; T II 485; LP 578

Sweet Isabella fair and young, C3 255; 20 II 131; LP 795

Sweet lassie I will gang wi' thee, 20 I 67; LP 346

Sweet little Bird in russet coat, A35 1; A40 122; A54 114; NG 132; T II 216; WS 33; BP 47; RM 74; MC 122; OA 225; B 63; MP III 287

Sweet little minstrel of the sunny summer, A54 418; A57 37; MC 471; OA 236; GS 116; MP IV 323

Sweet love I see the gales of Spring, 20 I 402; LP 663

[Sweet Lowland bard, thou dost so whistle: see Aye lowland bard]

Sweet Maiden of the early spring, 20 I 141; LP 427

Sweet maiden with those eyes of blue, C3 257; 20 II 132; LP 797

Sweet Mary nor tho sighs nor pains, A11 6; B2 269; VM I 177; T I 246; EP II 370

Sweet mystery that comes to bless, A48 11; B4 R104; MP II 189

Sweet opening vision of a royal line, A40 121; A54 344; B4 R79; T II 116; MC 389; MP IV 160

Sweet pastime here my mind so entertains, A40 90; B7 7; D12; NG 129; T II 15; JR 46; X 119; RM 72; MP IV 412

Sweet phantasies the woodland weaves (fragment), A57 55

Sweet Philis as fair as the hedge Rosey seems, 1 148; EP I 214

Sweet pipe awakend on the lowly hill, A10 12; 22 7; EP II 437

Sweet poesy in natures bosom dwells, A46 R161; 17 16; MP II 162

Sweet primrose peeping in the hazel copse, 20 I 215; LP 498

Sweet rural Songstres of the Rustic grove, A6 20; C2 33; 1 18; 4 14; EP I 34

Sweet russet stranger welcome here, BN 27

Sweet solitude what joy to be alone, C4 199; 20 II 333; T II 406; PJCM 211; X 81; LP 992

Sweet sleep & peace good night, EP I 372

Sweet summer breath your choicest gales, 20 I 53; Ch 224; LP 330

Sweet Susan Chaplin was a maid, 19 62; LPJC 124; LP 197

Sweet the merry bells ring round, B2 224a; B4 R103; C2 46; 4 41; OA 31; EP II 254

Sweet the pleasures I do find, A40 44; A54 304; MC 337; MP IV 72

Sweet the sun shines on the wild heaving sea, 20 I 12; LP 282

Sweet tiney flower of darkly hue, C2 62a; 1 25; 4 74; VM II 52-4; T I 37; TSP 9; EP II 10

Sweet twilight, nurse of dews, 19 123; 20 I 170; T II 417; LPJC 176; LP 459; OA 368; GS 321

Sweet type of innoscence snow clothed blosom, A5 33 etc; B2 248a; C2 41a; VM II 155; T I 129; EP II 317

Sweet unassuming minstrel not to thee, A18 10; A29 90; A40 66a; A54 351; B7 69a; T I 526; TSP 137; RM 114; MC 397; OA 108; 323; MP IV 182

Sweet uncultivated blossom, A3 97; B1 156; 5 109; PD 59; Ch 277; OA 10; EP I 411

[Sweet was thy bloom when first I met: see Fair was thy bloom when first I met]

Sweeter than music is the muses' bowers (fragment), B9 R22

Sweeter than roses was the face, LP 12

Sweeter than the blossomed beans, 20 I 262; LP 536

Sweetest illusion that our fancy greeteth, A18 R125; A30 174; B6 R52; 17 36; MP II 75

Sweetest of welcomes with the welcome spring, B6 R185

Sweetly comes the grassy summer, C4 271; 20 II 377; LP 1030

Swift goes the sooty swallow o'er the heath, 20 I 330; Ch 203; AS 164; T II 443; BP 129; OA 391; LP 600

Swords trumpets blunderbusses fires & thunder (The Hue & Cry'), A40 162-75; A18 88; A20 R16 etc; A26 1 etc.; A31 14a; A43 R105 etc; A48 15; A50 R35 etc; MP IV 518

Sybil of months & worshipper of winds, A18 85; A31 7; A41 32; A54 355; T I 535; RM 118; MC 403; OA 130; MP IV 195

Syren of sullen moods & fading hues, 17 82; AS 74; NG 99; GG 120; SPP 134; CC 69; RM 43; OA 161; MP III 258

 

 

Take back the rose nor let it wither, 20 I 363; LP 630

Tales which the gossip tell (stray couplet), MP II 107

Tall elms and dotterel trees before him lie (fragment), A57 11

Tall grows the nettle by the hedgeway side, 19 45; LP 186

Tall hollyhocks in gaudy hues (fragment), B4 R105; MP II 270

Taste is from heaven, A11 9; B2 271a; T I 279; OA 45; EP II 375

Taste with as many hues doth hearts engage, A18 60; A39 33; A41 40; A54 120; B5 42; AS 106; T I 442; SPP 112; MC 130; OA 170; MP II 142; E 99; MP III 303

Tasteful Illuminations of the night, A3 99; B1 159; 5 30; PD 139; T I 122; EP I 414

Tattered & ragg'd with great coat tyed in strings, A61 76; T II 351; LC 55; TSP 233; EF 118; CC 10; NS 84

Tell the wish of thy heart in flowers sweet maid, C4 51; 20 II 251; LPJC 248; LP 909

Tenant of leaves & flowers & glossy stalks, A13 30; A14 3; A18 64; A41 35; T I 532; JR 36; OA 130; EP II 478

That beauty is a snare & not a rest (stray couplet), MP II 201

That beauty which I praised before, B7 4, MP IV 63N

That farewell voice of love is never heard again, C4 377; 20 II 442; T II 510; JR 129; TSP 324; LP 1090

That good old fame the farmers earnd of yore, OA 98

That nessesary tool of Wealth & pride, 1 100; EP I 141

That summer bird its oft repeated note, A40 80a; A43 R92; A54 388; A56 R10; T I 524; JR 36; BP 37; RM 124; MC 436; OA 213; GS 100

The [ ] has [ ], EP I 368

the Apple top't oak in the old narrow lane, 20 I 161; LPJC 175; TSP 303; LP 450; OA 367; GS 320

The arching grove of ancient times, A37 28

The autumn day it [or now] fades away, 20 I 54; Ch 223; T II 414; OA 348; LP 332

The autumn is come and the fields are a ble[a], C3 177; 20 II 93; LP 756

The autumn morning waked by many a gun, A54 408; A57 80; T II 318; GG 170; SPP 151; CC 30; MC 458; GS 71; PM 37; PR 90; MP IV 307

The Autumn wind on suthering wings, C4 255; 20 I 205; 20 II 368; T II 413; PJCM 135; JR 115; TSP 306; LP 488; OA 372; GS 314

The autumns come again, 20 I 274; Ch 213; T II 410; PJCM 134; LC 59; OA 385; LP 547

[the awthorn gently stopt the sun beneath: see the hawthorn gently]

The badger grunting on his woodland track, B9 64; SPP 84; EF 111; CC 50; OA 246; W 161; GS 121; NS 26; PR 82

The ballad in the ploughman's pocket wears, T II 353; NS 101

The balmy breathing of her voice that breaks, EP II 519

The barn door is open & ready to winnow, B9 75; NS 35; E 7

The beans in bloom hung oer the path, B5 101; MP II 271

The beans in blossom with their spots of jet, A57 9; T II 330

The bearded rye was in the row, 20 I 26; LP 298

The beating snow clad bell wi sounding dead (The Woodman), A5 21; B2 236a; 2 6 etc; 4 133; VM II 20; NG 48; T I 198; OA 32; W 55; EP II 287

The beauties of Myra in it[s] lustre now dawning, EP I 269

The beauties o' youth lovley Emma [or Mary] adorning, A3 104; A40 33; B1 162; EP I 416

The beautiful Maria is a bonny Gipsey girl, C3 403; 20 II 203; LP 866

The Beauty Of Israel Is Fallen Away, 8 63; LP 113; C 3

The bee loves a blossom and I love a woman, 20 I 116; LP 401

The bench beside the door is seen, A59 81; NS 7

The bigot still determined shuts his eyes, MP II 325

The bird cherrys white in the dews o' the morning, 19 43; LPJC 115; OA 332; LP 185

The birds are gone to bed the cows are still, A40 191; A53 7; A54 369; T II 119; JR 61; LC 44; SPP 89; WS 81; X 104; LPL 13; CC 9; MC 418; OA 244; GS 117; MP IV 233

The birds they sing & build & nature scorns, T I 537; JR 37; MC 406; RM 134; MP IV 201

The black house bee hath laid to rest [see also Daughter of pastoral smells & sights]; MP I 103

The blackbird glories in the summer showers (fragment), A58 5

The Blackbird has a thousand whims, A46 13; A47 5; BN 25; MP II 166

The Blackbird Has Built In the Pasture Agen, 8 57; LPJC 73; OA 312; LP 81; C 14

The blackbird is a bonny bird, 20 I 145; OA 365; LP 432

The blackcap is a singing bird, A46 133; A47 3; T II 225; LC 47; TSP 213; PL 63

The blooms all fragrant feed the summer gales, A31 173; MP II 104

The blossom burthened ever welcome [or 'never-weary'] May, A35 20; A41 13; T II 121; JR 62; X 57; MP II 134

The blossom of the awthorn shook adown, MP II 324

The blossomed bean I love to see, LP 1083

The blue flower, Forget-me-not, 20 I 17; LP 287

The blushing teens The april time of love (stray line), MP II 270

The bolder rose smiles on the nights dull face, MP II 223

The bonny march morning is beaming, 20 I 108, 201; Ch 191; AS 158; T II 429; LP 390

The boy bends to the pelting storm (fragment), B3 28

The boy ne'er mends his face but soodling on (fragment), A21 12

The boy that goes to fodder with supprise, A57 2; A59 89; T II 312; SPP 143; GS 88; NS 8

The boy that runs behind the loaded wain, A59 70

The brakes, like young stag's horns, come up in Spring, PJCM 61; GG 178; LP 28; W 165

The bramble thriving well in every ground (fragment), A57 13

The braying fool with pompous pen (fragment), A51 9

The breezes waken on the downy plain (fragment), A21 19

The briar hanging over, uncropt by the cows, A59 8

The brighter the sun beam the seper the shadow (stray line) MP II 13

The brightest day may fade away, B4 47; MP II 263

The broad sun reddens up the purple sky (fragment), A59 79

The brook from its fountain rock drop after drop, EP II 523

The brook goes winding like a snake, 20 I 119; LP 404

The brook's declining heat fled boiling by, A18 70; B4 66

The broom it is bloomin', 20 I 189; 65; LP 474

The bullock in a restless mood, A46 130; A47 21

The burnet's tawny knopples (fragment), A57 6; T II 302

The bushes scarce would give the way, 7 17

The butterfly wi' wings of black and red (fragment), D18 3

The cake turned oft till both sides brown-awaits, A59 98; B6 107; NS 15

[the Calderwood echoes are loud in their glee: see the caulderwood echoes]

The cartway leading over every green, A54 421; A57 44; MC 474; JCSJ 2 4; MP IV 326

The cat runs races with her tail--the dog, A54 427; B6 59; T II 314; JR 90; LC 50; MC 482; OA 196; MP IV 336

The cataract whirling to the precipice, C3 196; 20 II 101; T II 426; PJCM 172; JR 119; LP 766

The caulderwood ecchoes are loud in their glee, 20 I 188; LP 472

The cause for which we ought to live (fragment), B7 2

The chaffinch in the hedge row sings In the brown naked thorn, C3 147; 20 II 79; LPJC 205; OA 402; LP 739

The chaffinch on the hedge row sings, LP 264

The chelping Sparrows little pilfering thieve[s], LP 244

The children by the cottage doors (fragment), A59 82

The childern free from school are at their play, 17 12; MP II 302

The chiming bells upon the sabbath day, MP II 6

The clock was all I had to mind, B 37

The closing year now filleth nature's hands, A50 R49; B9 R16; MP II 227

The cloudy morning brought a pleasant day, A61 81; T II 340; JR 95; BP 115; JCB 25; NS 88

The clumbsy ploughman knocks his hands, A61 114; NS 102

The coal black mantle night had us'd to wear (fragment), A21 15B

The cock awakes the rosey morn [or 'dawn'], A3 91; B1 145; PD 119; EP I 400; FT 140

The cock chafer hums down the rut rifted lane, C4 171; 20 II 316; Ch 171; AS 168; T II 449; LP 975

The cocks have now the morn foretold, B1 61; PD 92; T I 65; EP I 550; JCSJ 1 7

The coldest morn he throws his coat away, A61 66; NS 78

The columbine & deep stone blue, EP II 522

The common woodbine in the hedgerow showers, A54 435; B6 71; MC 490; MP IV 350

The cool breeze wakens in the evens prime (stray couplet), MP II 245

The cool of the evening is the hour of heaven, 20 I 13; PJCM 124; LP 283

The corn is in the ear, 20 I 102; LP 384

The corncraik rispt her summer call Just as the sun went down, C3 231; 20 II 124; PJCM 183; LPJC 215; X 183; OA 404; LP 788

The cow from the green chews her cud at the gate, B6 175

The cow that the hovel-prison leaves (fragment), A59 74

The coward he may cringe (fragment), A51 5

The cowboy sees [or 'hears'] the spring & hears [or 'sees'] the crows, A61 23; T II 360; NS 58

The cow boy shuns the shower and seeks the mat, A61-51; T II 364

The cowboys dog will bite his hide & lie, B9 101; NS 46

The cow boys hut of straw neglected lies, A61053; T II 365; NS 72

The cows are from the pasture gone the sheep are bleating in the pen, C3 161; 20 II 84; LPJC 208; LP 746

The cows stand loitering by the flaggy brink, A31 R49

The cows they are out in the pasture, C4 95; 20 II 275; LPJC 254; LP 933

The coy hedge sparrow flaps her wing, A59 74; B6 5; MaC 57; T II 295; BP 108

The crib stocks fothered--horses suppered up, A54 431; A57 4; T II 320; JR 91; JC [13]; SPP 153; EF 119; MC 486; OA 199; W 138; GS 45; PR 78; MP IV 343

The crimpt leaved brake that summer left so green (fragment), A46 153; A48 9; A53 56v; MP II 201

The crow goes flopping on from wood to wood, D18 2; T II 239; TSP 215; BP 88

The crow sat on the willow tree, C3 339; 20 II 172; T II 452; LPJC 225; SPP 200; X 190; BP 138; LP 837; OA 406; GS 346; E 26

The crow will tumble up and down, B6 33; T II 341; SPP 83; BP 118; OA 222; GS 51; CK 61

The crowing cock & cackling hen, A23 26; A30 31; B8 R60; MP II 41

The crowing coks the morn for told, 1 174; EP I 242

The crows drive onward through the storm of snow, A61 82; T II 367; JR 101; X 51; NS 89

The crows will swee above & often flye, A61 87; BN 55

The cuckoo like a hawk in flight, A47 26; A53 12; BN 28; JCB 19; MP II 182

The curious sphinx or moths of day, NH 259n1; MP II 186

[the daisy button, tipped wi' dew: see the daisy button tipped wi dew...]

The Daisey by the road side [it is a pretty flower], C4 31; 20 II 242; LPJC 242; LP 899

The Daisy is a happy flower, C4 395; D25; 21 II 451; T II 439; PJCM 222; TSP 341; X 88; LP 1099; LP 1101

The daisey is tipped wi the dew, C4 322; 20 II 407; LP 1058

The daisy luiks sweet at the spring o' the year, C4 103; 20 II 281; LP 938

The daisy smiles early and in its gold eye (fragment), A57 R97

The daisey wan the primrose pale, 17 22; T II 66; JR 57; MP II 304

The daisy-button tipped wi' dew Green like the grass was sleeping, C3 215; 20 II 111; LPJC 213; LP 775; GS 341

The daisys golden eye, 20 I 52; OA 347; LP 328

The daisies silver white, EP I 371

The damdest thing in life spurned at & kicked, MP II 81

The dame lapt in her cloak of grey (fragment), B5 45

The dancing Cowslips come in pleasant hours, T II 380; LP 34

The dandelion's down (fragment), B6 109

The dareing Bird that hardly shuns, 1 198; EP I 269

The dark days of Autumn grows cloudy and rainy, C3 285; 20 II 146; TSP 332; LPJC 220; LP 811

The day has clos'd its weary toils in bed, A5 R9; A40 41a; C2 43; 4 36; EP I 445; EP I 448

The day is all round me the woods and the fields, 20 I 64; PJCM 115; X 45; OA 349; LP 342

The day it was dawning so soon in the morning, 20 I 196; PJCM 144; LP 481

The day was cold and rawkin, C4 155; 20 II 307; LPJC 260; LP 966

The day was hot and noisy, flies abroad (fragment), A58 5

The day waxes warmer, A20 38; A40 188; A50 R37; A54 291; T II 86; RM 98; MC 321; MP IV 46; K 44

The dead grass overhung the ruts, A61 100

[the death of Dobbin...: see Old Dobbin dead I sing a mournful tune]

The debtor to pay what he never had paid (fragment), A55 10

The deed is done, A38 R18; MP II 82

The develing black as coal comes out at night, B9 77; BN 47; JCB 64; NS 36

The dew drops on every blade of grass are so much like silver drops, T II 426; JR 119; TSP 308; CC 4; OA 413; LP 909

The dew it trembles on the thorn, 20 I 217; T II 472; OA 376; LP 499; K 80

The dewey evening with its orange sky, C4 49; 20 II 251; PJCM 204; LP 908

The dews are all gone save amid the dark glooms, A18 89; A22 R21; A30 100; A41 R88; A54 157; B6 R186; MP III 375

The dewy virtues of the early morn, A18 85; A41 41; A54 362; T I 539; RM 139; MC 411; MP IV 214

The dog he asked the bramble bush, 7 33

The dreary fen a waste of water goes, A61 41; T II 361; OA 265; NS 64

The driving boy, beside his team, JR 20; X 78

The driving clouds in dark condension hung, EP I 512

The droneing bee has wakened up, 20 I 36; OA 343; LP 308

The dropping wind seemed whispering in affright, A50 R76; A53; MP II 242

The Eagle never pounces at a grasshopper (stray line), MP II 336

The early boy that cannot catch by force, B9 60; NS 22

The early-rising sun creeps up the blue, A57 12

The early snail slow paced & never brief, B9 67; NS 29

The earth reigneth now earth is green in his smiles, 6 31; LP 136; C 127

The eldern opens by the cottage eves, A25 R22; A30 175; B7 72; EP II 582

The Elm tree's heavy foliage meets the eye, C4 377; 20 II 441; PJCM 222; GG 233; LP 1090; OA 427; W 198

The eve drops dash wi pleasant noise, A18 183; MP I 33

The eve put on her sweetest shroud, A5 35; A16 20; B2 210; VM II 1; T I 111; EP II 217

The eve winds of autumn blow chilly & hollow, A14 1; EP II 489

The Even comes and the Crow flies low, C3 418; 20 II 213; OA 410; LP 876

The evening [even] comes in sober hue (deleted fragment), A39 31, MP II 127

The evening comes the evening goes high mounts the evening star, C3 131; 20 II 74; LP 731

The evening gathers from the gloomy woods, A54 401; A57 R122; T II 320; SPP 156; CC 42; MC 450; GS 47; MP IV 297

The evening is for love As the morning is for toil, C3 155; 20 II 82; LPJC 207; LP 742; GS 339

The evening oer the meadow seems to stoop, A54 426; B6 57; T II 318; SPP 154; CC 26; MC 481; OA 195; W 135; GS 44; MP IV 335

The evening star the shepherd of the rest (stray couplet), MP II 295

The evening was lovely and littered wi dew, C3 317; 20 II 162; LPJC 224; LP 827

The evening was wet and the twilight was cold, C3 173; 20 II 90; LP 753

The ever-burning flame (fragment), A39 23

The expansive sunshine and the peaceful sky (fragment), A58 4

The fading Autumn all resighn'd, 1 192; EP I 226

The faint sun tipt the rising ground, A6 34; C2 34; 1 20; 4 16; VM II 37; T I 31; EP II 4; JCSJ 7 26

The fair was at the market town, A59 104

The fairest summer hath its sudden showers, A18 56; A41 41; A54 362; T I 529; RM 138; MC 410; MP IV 213

The faireys heard her song & so much they loved the tune, MP II 323

The farmer sees what time the day alows, A61 18a; NS 56

The farmers busy tools are laid away, A61 62; NS 76

The fielding flower it thrives the best (fragment), A59 102; T II 302

The fields all cleared, the labouring mice, T I 241; LC 30

The fields all mire and sludge are badly off (fragments), B6 64

The fir-trees taper into twigs and wear, T II 329; JR 92; WS 32

The fire tail tells the boys when nests are nigh, A61 8; T II 338; BP 112; OA 242; NS 55

The firetail, long a stranger, comes, A18 R197

The firs that [or the fir-trees] taper into twigs and wear, A57 1; T II 238; CC 33

The fitful weather changes every hour, A57 13; T II 317; OA 200; NS 5

The flag top quivers in the breeze, 20 I 16; T II 438; LPJC 167; LP 339; OA 349; GS 279

The f[l]aggy forrest beat the billows breast, A61 36; OA 264; NS 62

The flaggy wheat is in the ear, C4 289; 20 II 287; MaC 49; T II 421; JR 117; LPJC 273; OA 424; LP 1040

The floating garments of the air (fragment), A39 23

The floods come oer the meadow leas, A62 R9; 6 37; PJCM 106; GG 208; LPJC 63; X 110; CC 46; OA 303; LP 70; B 85; C 116

The flower of Ould Ireland is Kate o' Killarney, C4 115; 20 II 287; LP 945

The flower of our valley Is the milkmaiden Sally, C3 251; 20 II 128; LP 793

The flower refreshed by morning dews, 1 170

The flower that gathered beauty soon forsakes, A31 151; A40 73; Ch 257; T I 530; EP II 530

The flower that lives on pleasure's paths (fragment), A39 27

The flowers are silent in their bloom, 20 I 75; MaC 14; T II 436; LP 356

The fly or beetle on their track, 20 I 329; LPJC 189; LP 598; OA 390; V 172; GS 332

The foddering boy along the crumping snows, A25 R73; 17 20; MaC 24; T II 151; JR 70; GS 89; EP II 585; E 21; B 50

'The fool will squeeze from morn till night, MP II 271

The Forest meets the blessings of the Spring, PJCM 63; LP 35

The fountain of the morning in lights streames... (prose-poem fragment), MP II 151

The fragrance of the fields when summer's rain (fragment), B5 65

The fresh beauties of youth, lovely Emma adorning, 5 172; EP I 497

The friends of yesterday have sunk away (fragment), A50 R50

The frighted women takes the boys away, T II 333; X 104; DW 39; OA 247; W 162; GS 122; NS 28; PR 84; JCSC 47

The frog croaks loud and maidens dare not pass, B9 91; T II 338; BP 114; OA 275; NS 42

The frog half fearful jumps accross the path, A54 340; 17 121; AS 125; T II 145; JR 68; X 63; CC 57; MC 384; GS 117; MP IV 147

The frog jumps away as if startled at thieves, A45 R47

The frolicksome wind through the trees and the bushes, 20 I 347; LPJC 190; LP 614; OA 392; GS 331

The Fruit is fair to luik upo', 19 2; LPJC 97; LP 162

The furze bush like the evening cloud, A59 7; B6 76

The garden now is growing out of flowers (stray couplet), MP II 243

The gay & merry maidens leave the farm, A61 42; NS 65

The gay convolvulus funnel shaped flowers, A18 83; A50 R46; MP II 224

The gayest today, B4 47

The geese are out the spring is come, 7 37; NS 51

The Gipseys life is a merry life, A31 60; A40 65a; A54 294; B7 60; Ch 299; T II 210; TSP 208; MC 325; MP IV 52

The gipsies seeking [or 'seek wide'] sheltering woods again, B9 82; MaC 41; T II 349; GG 172; LC 54; X 213; EF 113; NS 38

The gipsy is a summer bird (fragment), A50 R60

The girl I love is flesh and blood, C3 7; 20 II 4; LPJC 196; LP 688; GS 337; K 81

The girning winds bit sharp and thin (fragment), A57 9; T II 301

The glory from the earth hath passd away, MP II 321

The gnats danced o'er the waters clear, 20 I 397; LP 659

The golden rose smiles on the night's dull face (fragment), A50 R44

The golden sun unpuckers every smile, MP II 320

The golden wren is rarely seen, A47 18; A51 81

The gouden clouds o'er westling sky's Where the retiring day, 20 II 189; LP 853

The grave it is an humble shrine (stray couplet), MP II 151

'the graves of those we loved', 20 I 55; LP 333

The green woodpecker flying up & down, B9 69; BN 41; JCB 16; OA 271; W 157; NS 31

The grey green willow whispers, C4 7; 20 II 232; LPJC 238; LP 889

The ground is hard & oer the follows now, B9 79; T II 371; NS 37

The happy birds in their delight bring home, A54 430; 29 23; MC 486; MP IV 342

The happy boys are up by times at morn, A42 14; MP II 150

The happy thorn bushes were just in their greenest, C4 91; 20 II 273; LP 931

The happy whitethroat on the sweeing bough, A37 43; A54 378; B8 R113; T II 246; BP 103; RM 120; MC 427; OA 211; JCB 49; JCSJ 3 30; MP IV 249

The Harebell decks the woods in blue, C2 61; 1 71; 4 71; EP I 97

The harp-strings of life with sweet feelings was strung (fragment), A10 1; A13 43; A50 R52

The harvest morn, a busy man, A59 72; B6 11; MaC 35; T II 292

The haughty maid by gazing on the skies, B5 R78

The hawthorn gently stopt the sun, beneath, A11 1a; 3 164; Sheffield Iris (5 Sep 1820); VM II 190; T I 276; EP II 116

The hay was mown and grounds were cleared, 20 I 341; LP 608

The hazel blooms in threads of crimson hue, A37 36; A54 400; A57 R92; B8 R121; T II 136; JR 67; JC [2]; SPP 126; WS 21; RM 128; MC 450; GS 48; PR 79; MP IV 296

The healthfull mind that muses & inhales, 19 85; LP 231

The heart of Midlothian is nearly my own, C4 3; 20 II 230; LP 888

The heart that's smit with the white and red, A40 83; B9 46; MaC 68; T II 200; MP IV 393

The heavens are wrath the thunders rattling peal, 6 8; 8 17; T II 391; PJCM 94; GG 205; LPJC 42; OA 285; LP 48; PM 49 & 47; C 50

The heavens his wonderous works declare, 6 55; LP 131; C 117

The heavier as my burden grows, A57 23

The heavy snow keeps falling all the day, A61 106; NS 98

The heavy thick mist hangs over the sun, A10 7a; EP II 428

The hedge rose blossoms like thy face, LP 683

The hedgehog hides beneath the rotten hedge, B9 68; T II 337; JC [3]; SPP 88; WS 76; EF 111; CC 2; OA 248; W 163; GS 119; NS 29; E 52

The hedger burning hot when passersbye, A59 91; NS 11

The hedger he has stopped the gap (fragment), A57 R16

The hedge row fruit in plenty plainly shows, A57 R16; NS 6

The hedgerow hips to glossy scarlet turn, A57 16; T II 301

The hedgerow trees to red and yellow turn (fragment), A57 12

The hedgerows blossom like thy face, C3 35; 20 II 19

The herd that gallops from the tiresome tune (fragment), A59 86

The herdsman he lies where the dewberries shoot (fragment), A51 101

The heroes of the present & the past, A45 19; A54 184; T II 104; RM 47; MC 197; MP III 449

The higher the fountain the water flows clearer (fragment), A28 11

The hind that were chopping them up for his fire, EP I 543

The hirpling stranger comes from distant town, A61; NS 74

The hoar frost lodges on every tree, A60 5; OA 262

The holly bush a sober lump of green, A59 96; B6 100; T II 310; BP 107; NS 14

The horn awakes the hunting train, 1 199

The horses are look out the cows are fed, A61 48; NS 68

The huge oaks' splintered trunks appear, A47 4

The hugh old rock stood in a bushy dell, A61 110; NS 100

The humble flowers that buds upon the plain, 1 171; EP I 240

The hurly burly wind, 20 I 335; TSP 326; LP 604

The husbandman beholds the freshing pot (fragment), A21 5

The hut that stands in unpretending pride, A31 R210; A40 138; A42 111; A54 133; T II 43; MC 143; MP III 330

The hypocondriac snuffs the morning air (stray couplet), MP II 244

The idle boy lies in the bush & makes, B9 51; NS 19

The idle boys go far away, B9 80; NS 37

The idle boys the sunday never heeds, B9 53; T II 337; EF 114; NS 18

The idle turkey gobbling half the day, B9 73; BN 59; OA 274; NS 34

The infant April joins the spring, A30 3 etc; D7 1; Pfz. 198, 69 75, R78, R81 (ClJ 15); SC (April); MP I 50

The inscet tribe that drink the dew (fragment), MP II 333

The insect world, amid the suns and dew, A21 29; A30 68; T I 375; JR 21; X 90; CC 56; PM 39

The insect world, now sunbeams higher climb, Ch 265; T II 149; JR 69; X 56

The inward tear the silent sigh, 20 I 308; LP 579

The jackdaws come & crowd wi merry noise, 17 6; MP II 298

The jay set up his copple crown, BN 35; JCB 13

The joys of childhood are full thickly sown, A21 R41; A31 R197; A50 R72; T II 41; GG 137; EP II 523

The juicey wheat now spindles into ear, A40 8; A51 51; A54 387; T I 524; RM 123; MC 435; OA 113; MP IV 267

The keenest sorrow hath no tongue (stray couplet), MP II 201

The king may have a finer bride (fragment), B9 95

The kingcups shew their golden looks, 20 I 167; LP 456

The kisses pressed upon our yielding lips (fragment), B5 R65

The land it is a dangerous strand, 19 88; LPJC 150; LP 230

The landscape laughs in spring & stretches on, A33 R2; MP II 108; E 9

[The landscape sleeps in mist...: See The village sleeps in mist from morn till noon]

The landscapes stretching view that opens wide, A3 98; B1 158; 4 91; 5 51; PD 138; T I 116; LC 22; LPL 9; OA 11; EP I 413; B 9

The lark he rises early, A61 25; T II 372; JR 101; WS 40

The Larks in the sky love, 19 40; 20 I 185; Ch 246; LPJC 113, 178; LP 183

The latter end of Autum, C3 97; 20 II 55; LPJC 202; LP 714

The leaning hovel stands behind the hay, A61; NS 62

The leaves of Autumn drop by two's and three's, 20 I 249; T II 413; JR 115; LP 523

The leaves they fly before the blast, B9 6; MP II 309

The linnet sat upon its nest, 20 I 294; Ch 186; AS 157; T II 407; LC 57; LP 566; K 83

The little bird in merry mood, A40 55; MP IV 377

The little brig is broken down, B6 155

The little cottage stood alone, the pride, A59 80; T II 276

The little lambs that dithering used to hide (fragment), A21 8

The little lark now fills its crop with corn (stray line), MP II 244

The little paths are printed every one, A59 90; NS 9

The little robin from the plum-tree bough: see The little robin is his mate in spring

The little robin is his mate in spring (fragment), B3 94; MP II 255

The little violets blue and white, A59 76; MaC 13; T II 287

The lonesome wood anemonie, 20 I 32; PJCM 111; X 179; LP 305

The Lord He Has Triumphed His People Are Free, LP 105; C 7

The Lord of life he reigns above, 20 I 247; LP 522

[the Lord reigneth now earth is green in his smiles: see the Earth reigneth]

The lover comes and hollos in the dark, A61 65; NS 78

The maid grew pale and sickened when alone, B9 98

The maid has beauty at her will, A61 122; T II 374; NS 106

The maid I love is fair as driven snow, C4 239; 20 II 359; LP 1015

The maid that never cares for usuage ruff, A61 118; NS 104

The maid who roams upon the plain, EP I 352

The maiden journeying o'er the meadow path (fragment), A58 18

The maiden ran away to fetch the cloaths, A61 79; T II 366; JR 101; NS 85; E 20

The maiden takes the basket on her arm, B9 94

The maidens light foot seems to pity the flowers, 20 I 162; LP 452

The maiden[s] shout to breakfast round the yard, A61 128; NS 109

The maids of Ould Ireland, C4 135; 20 II 297; LP 955

The man of science in discovery's moods (fragment), A51 42

The man of taste in fine ideas feeds, A31 27

The man of taste that takes his walks anew (fragment), A21 31

The man who boasts of wealth, MP II 185

The many tracks a many ways (fragment), A59 75

The maple hangs its green bee flowers, C3 27; 20 II 14; PJCM 167; LP 678

The Maple with its tassell flowers of green, C4 261; 20 II 371; T II 435; JR 123; LPJC 270; X 87; OA 423; LP 1025

The martin cat long shaged of courage good, B9 61; MaC 61; T II 335; JC [7]; SPP 86; DW [7]; EF 112; CC 28; OA 244; W 159; GS 118; NS 23

The martin hurrys through the woodland gaps, DW [11]; OA 245; W 159; GS 118; NS 24

The may bush smells sae very sweet, 19 108; LPJC 141; LP 219

The may flowers are springing, 20 I 221; LP 502

The may is in the meadows coming in, A51 57; D11

The may is on the hedges white as snow [or all around], A58 20 (fragment); 17 5; MP II 297

The May is out a-maying and the earth (fragment), A58 20

The may is out whose tiny threads (fragment), A58 6

The meadow gap and dotterel trees, A59 50

The meadow with its sweep of level green, A54 404; A57 R106; MC 454; MP IV 301

The meadows fill with cowslips, 9 1; PJCM 191; LPJC 156; LP 247

The meadows grow delightful, A57 5; B6 69

The merry childern shout, the herd is come, A61 71; NS 81

The merry maiden has to milking gone, A61 73; NS 82

The merry spring turns winter out of doors (fragment), MP II 352

The mid day hour of twelve the clock counts oer, A10 5a; VM II 180; T I 271; JR 18; GG 84; LC 31; WS 42; OA 65; W 73; EP II 423

The midges o'er the river dance, C4 385; 20 II 444; LP 1094

The Milton hunt again begun, A5 47; A40 42; C2 46a; 3 200; 4 43; 32 12; L 154; EP II 198

The mind is ever flitting; what appears (fragment), A57 R16

The mist hangs thick about the early field; 17 14; T II 127; JR 64; MP II 304

The mist lies on the weeds but clears away, A61 46; T II 362; OA 266; NS 66

The mist rauk is hanging, C4 225; 20 II 350; LP 1007; V 182

The months have nearly traveled round, 20 I 364; LP 631

The moon above the hills is peeping, 20 I 156; LP 445

The moon looks through the window late at eve, A54 414; A57 30; MC 466; MP IV 317

The moon smiles beautiful as springs soft even, EP II 522

The moonlight litters thro the under wood (fragment), MP II 337

The moor buzzard lays on the ground, A46 152

The morn is still & balmy all that moves, A54 428; A57 64; MC 483; OA 196; MP IV 338

The morn is up with summer's savoury smell (fragment), A57 R96

The morning air is rich to meet, H23; LP 234

The morning comes--the drops of dew, 20 I 74; T II 416; LPJC 167; WS 41; LP 355; OA 352; GS 279

The morning drizzled flying showers abroad (fragment), A59 99

The morning hour the sun beguiles, A40 70a; A54 298; MC 330; MP IV 60

The morning is up betimes my dear, 20 I 120; LP 405

The morning mist (stray phrase), MP II 353

The morning mist is changing blue, 20 I 66; LP 345; E 56

The morning now right earlily in dew, A18 61; A41 39; MaC 25; T I 540; GG 118; X 62; MP II 141

The morning opens fine bonny Mary O, C3 121; 20 II 69; Ch 182; AS 159; T II 490; LP 726

The morning peeped, and Mary with her pail, 1 86

The morning road is thronged with merry boys, A61 70; T II 355; OS 28; NS 80

The morning tide is sweet and fair, 20 I 182; LP 468

The morning wakens with the lumping frails, A25 R23; A48 28; B7 71; T II 120; JR 62; EP II 584

The morning wakes dewy & sunny & light, C3 19; 20 II 10; PJCM 164; LP 675

The mower tramples on the wild bees nest, A61 29; T II 361; OA 264; W 155; NS 60

The music of thy voice is steeling, 20 I 134; LP 420

The mystery of this lingering pain, A31 56; B8 R16; 38; L 368; MP II 342

The narrow mind may bonds prescribe, A57 R72

The narrow oak plank o'er so deep a stream (fragment), B5 80

The new spring grass was high (fragment), A59 75

The nigher the fountain the water flows clearer, MP II 31

The night grows dull the maiden hurries on, A61 61; NS 76

The night hath hung the morning smiles in showers, A54 425; A57 R93; T II 319; MC 479; MP IV 332

The night in yon castle now lulls the clowns sleep, EP II 163

The night is still dead Oak leaves strew, C3 297; 20 II 152; LPJC 222; LP 816

The night was dismal, dark the rain, A59 1; B6 35

The nightingale so sweetly trills away (stray couplet), MP II 244

The nodding oxeye bends before the wind, A48 10; A54 395; AS 129; T II 148; JR 68; MC 444; MP IV 283

The noisy blathering calves are fed & all, A61 50; T II 363; NS 70

The noisey oath to drive the hogs, 7 page not known; NS 51

The nuts are falling frae the lim's, C4 221; 20 II 348; 20 II 348

The oak's slow-opening leaf, of deepening hue, B1 60; PD 148; AS 9; T I 125; GG 43; EP I 521

The ocean tossed its frothing mane on high (deleted fragment), A39 32, MP II 128

The oddling bush close shelterd hedge new plashed, A57 15; A59 92; T II 242; BP 94; JCB 56; NS 11

The old dame gets the kettle on & cake, A61 43; NS 65

The old dyke, full of flags & margin wide, B9 76; NS 35

The old hen thrusts & trys agen, 7 page not known; NS 48

The old hens cackle & begin the day, A61 108; T II 369; NS 99

The old mans beard blooms on the hedge (stray couplet), MP II 334

The old mans beard is full of flower, A37 33; A53 76; MP II 110

The old pond full of flags & fenced around, B9 84; OA 275; NS 40

The Old Year's gone away, 20 I 183; Ch 248; T II 465; LP 469; V 168

The one delicious green that now prevades, A40 192; A54 373; B5 1; SPP 129; MC 422; NH 315; GS 56; MP IV 241

The only sign of books about the place, A61 127; NS 108

The orphan it may mourn awhile (fragment), MP II 332

The painted tulip in her bloom begun, A48 26; GG 115; CC 59; MP II 245

The Parish hind oppressions humble slave (The Parish), A21 47; A29 19 etc; A40 1 etc; B6 R234; B7 25b; 17 30 etc; T I 542; TSP 140; EF 45; PA; W 100 [extracts]; EP II 697; E 27

The partridge makes no nest but on the ground, B9 99; OA 277; JCB 73; NS 45

The passer bye oft stops his horse to look, B9 97; OA 276; JCB 77; NS 44

The passing of a dream, 20 I 133; T II 519; PJCM 137; X 109; LP 419; V 174

The passing traveller with wonder sees, A61 107; T II 355; JR 98; GG 172; X 85; OA 270; W 156; JCSJ 7 4; NS 98; E 10

The past and future ill agree, B8 115

The past it is a majic word, A20 43; A40 153; A54 89; B6 R197; SPP 14; MC 96; OA 113; GS 180; MP III 229

The past we know-- but hope can find no rest, A48 29; B7 77; T II 306; MP II 200

The path crossed green closes and went down the lane, C3 363; 20 II 183; PJCM 195; LPJC 230; LP 847

The path goes through the farm I often turn, A61 21; NS 57

The path that led across the fiel, C4 69; 20 II 261; LPJC 252; LP 919

The pent-up homestead's crowded foliage fades, B6 57

The pewit is come to the green, A57 53; B6 30; T II 91; RM 102; OA 203; MP IV 580

The Pilewort and the daisy's I love to see them come, C3 387; 20 II 195; LPJC 234; LP 860

The pilewort through the meadow blazes the daisy blooms again, C3 311; 20 II 159; PJCM 188; X 180; LP 824

The pleasant banks that easy lye (stray couplet), MP II 346

The pleasant garden ever neat and small (fragment), B9 97

The pleasant time of summer is begun (fragment), D15 1

The plough team wet and dripping plashes home [from 'the Summer Shower'], W 133

The ploughboy milks his cows by break of day, A61 109; NS 99

The ploughman goes along with lazy speed, B9 93; NS 49

The ploughman hurrys up by crow of cock, NS 53

The ploughman stops his waggon at the fore, A61 120; T II 370; NS 105

The ploughmen are out before the cock crows, A61 103; FT 181

The poesy of life is past; MP II 248

[the poet it delights not to pursue: see Syren of sullen moods & fading hues]

The power of thought the fount of mind (fragment), MP II 251

The present is the funeral of the past, 19 28; T II 464; PJCM 142; JR 124; LP 173

The pretty flowers were springing, C3 93; 20 II 53; LP 712

The pride of all the village, T II 372

The prim daisy's golden eye, Ch 226; T II 432

The primrose pale and daisy's eye (fragment), B3 50

The primrose peeps, C3 309; 20 II 158; LP 823

The publicans meek prayer--'Have mercy Lord', A50 R59; MP II 238

The rabbit burrows newly made (fragment), MP II 201

The rain bow sweepeth in a mighty stride,; MP II 249

The rain is come in misty showers, 20 I 244; T II 409; JR 112; WS 31; X 71; OA 381; LP 520; PM 43

The rank luxuriant Flag that skirts the brooks, A31 32; 17 96; MP II 313

The rauk o' the hills & the mist o' the mountains, 20 I 333; LP 602

The rawk o' the Autumn hangs over the woodlands, C4 211; 20 II 342; T II 506; LPJC 266; LP 999; OA 421; GS 354

The red bagged bee on never weary wing, 19 31; OA 331; LP 177

The red east glows the dewey cheek of morning [or day], B2 246a; C2 52; 4 54; VM II 164; T I 263; EP II 311

The red rose in her cheeks doth blushing lie (fragment), A51 1

The red sun rises o'er the bare wood top, A13 22

The redcap is a painted bird, A47 2; A53 13; T II 231; TSP 214; BP 75

The reeking supper waits the labourer home, A61 82; NS 88

The remnant leaves left flapping o'er the head (fragment), A57 15

The rich brown umber hue the oaks unfold, A40 192; A54 374; T II 121; SPP 127; MC 423; NH 315, 316; GS 54; MP IV 242

The rich man claims it--but he often buys, A41 46; A54 363; B6 R227; T II 109; RM 129; MC 412; MP IV 217

The rich mans sins are under, A18 R248; EP II 518

The rich, they pity want of course, B6 113

The river rambles like a snake, C3 21; 20 II 11; PJCM 166; WS 47; X 85; OA 397; LP 675

The road went winding on and on, A55 1

The roads are thronged with mire from hasty showers, A25 R25; 17 18; EP II 587

The roads begin to stand wi spungy pudges, MP II 11

The Robin from his root pops out, Texas (ClJ 341)

The rocks and sholes of life, 20 I 317; LP 588

The rolls & harrows lie[s] at rest beside, A37 36; A54 228; B8 R120; T II 221; JR 73; SPP 77; WS 57; BP 57; CC 71; RM 83; MC 244; OA 215; GS 103; JCSJ 1 53; E 43; MP III 523

The rooks begin to build & pleasant looks, B9 78; BN 53; JCB 10; OA 274; PM 79; NS 36

The Rose & lilly blooms again, 1 216; EP I 300

The rose in full bearing there is no other blossom, C3 115; 20 II 67; LP 724

The rose of the morning, 20 I 21; LP 292

The Rose Of the World Was Dear Mary To Me, 8 58; LPJC 74; OA 313; LP 82; C 16

The rosey day was sweet & young, A2 R128; C2 44a; 3 195; 4 39; 32 31, 45; VM I 124; T I 181; JR 7; OA 52; EP II 187

The roseys red the roseys white, A40 96; A54 302; B4 29; MC 335; MP IV 68

The ruin of a ruin--man of mirth, 19 9; LPJC 101; LP 167

The rural occupations of the year, A54 426; SPP 137; MC 480; GS 71; MP IV 334

The rushbeds touched the boiling spring, 20 I 253; T II 424; LPJC 186; LP 527

The russet meads speaks summers fragrance fled, A40 50a; B2 208a; C2 44; 4 38; EP II 214

The rustling of leaves under the feet in woods and under hedges, 20 I 298; MaC 42; T II 427; JR 120; LC 63; LPL 10; X 75; LP 570

The sabbath day of every day the best, B2 265; VM I 171; T I 188; EP II 359

The sailing puddock sweeps about for prey, B9 71; BN 63; OA 272; JCB 5; W 158; NS 32

The scene it was cheery when I met my deary, A10 18a; EP II 450

The school boy sets his basket down to play, A61 129; NS 110

The schoolboys in the morning soon as drest, B9 62; OA 271; JCB 35; NS 24

The school boy[s] still their [or his] morning ramble[s] take[s], A25 R24; 17 19; MaC 23; T II 150; JR 70; LC 46; W 137; EP II 586

The school boys with thier ruddy cheeks, MP II 106

The school road was a pleasant way, 7 23

The scutcheon'd pomp that decks wealth's grave so high (fragment), A27 R21

The season now is all delight, A28 11; LM (Jul 1822) 5; SCVS 185; T I 341; GG 94; X 57; MP I 305

The sedges sighing by the meadow stream, LP 910

The seeding done the fields are still at morn, A61 22; OA 263

The sentimental preacher with sad vein (fragments), A35 12

The setting sun it gilds wi' gold And village windows blazes now, C3 139; 20 II 77; LP 735

The setting sun withdraws her yellow light, B2 145; VM II 184; T I 273; EP II 81

The settled clouds in ridges lie, PM 41

The sharp wind shivers in the warm gorse blossoms, C3 333; 20 II 169; PJCM 192; GG 299; CC 8; LP 834

The sheds are cleaned and littered down before, A57 R16

The sheep get up & make their many tracks, A61 21a; T II 371; GG 173; JC [12]; X 51; CC 25; OA 263; W 155; CK 23; NS 58

The shepherd bends musing beneath the green thorn, A30 160; A54 318; B6 R60; B8 95; MC 356; MP IV 109

The shepherd blows his fingernails (fragment), D14 8

The shepherd boy bends to the sudden storm, 17 32; MP II 305

The shepherd boy leans idly by the stile, MP II 312

The shepherd boy pulled off his hat, A61 20

The shepherd boy turns angler soon as e'er (fragment), A31 23

The shepherd boy with little else to do, B9 81; NS 38

The shepherd boys play by the shaded stile, A40 20a; A51 116; A54 354; D14 11; T II 134; RM 117; MC 402; MP IV 193

The shepherd boys their old delights renew (fragment), A21 5

The shepherd dog up-springing through the furze (fragment), A57 16

The shepherd musing oer his summer [or 'meadow'] dreams, A18 10; A29 91; A40 67; A54 351; B7 71; T I 527; MC 398; OA 108; L 324; MP IV 183

The shepherd on his journey heard when nigh, B9 63; T II 334; JR 94; JC [4]; SPP 87; X 102; OA 245; W 160; GS 120; NS 25

The shepherds almost wonder where they dwell, A61 47; MaC 40; T II 360; JR 99; WS 35; OA 266; NS 67

The shepherds & the herding swains, A20 52; T I 272; SPP 94; W 86; GS 93; MP II 15

The Shepherd's hut propt by the double ash, A40 193; A54 372; T II 141; SPP 99; RM 144; MC 421; GS 92; MP IV 238

The shepherds idle hours are over now [from 'June', Shepherd's Calendar], W 115

The shrill bat there its evening circles makes, MP II 104

The shorten'd night falls then and clouds lie still (fragment), A21 11

The shutters closd the lamp alight, A18 R120; A29 R173; SC (January: A Cottage Evening); MP I 12

The silver mist more lowly swims, 20 I 69; T II 419; JR 117; X 75; OA 352; LP 350

The Simmer time in simmers prime, C4 325; 20 II 409; LP 1059

The simmering sap froths out at either end, MP II 215

The simple swain whose joys no fears eclipse, B4 106

The sinken sun is takin leave, B1 48; 1 96; LM (Mar 1820) 327; 29; PD 86; NG 25; PCFM 55; T I 60; SPP 10; CC 40; OA 14; W 44; GS 39; EP I 5

The sinking sun sheds through the window glass, 19 37; LP 181

The skylark mounts up with the morn, 20 I 43, 235; Ch 197; AS 148; T II 499; LPJC 181; LP 512; GS 326

The small occupations of the year, B6 55

The small wind wispers thro the leafless hedge, A15 7; 7 95; VM II 183; T I 272; OA 96; L 116; EP II 492; PM 103

The smell of flowers & grass & breathing cow (deleted fragment), A33 R3, MP II 108

The smith kicked down the yet remaining pin (fragment), B6 109

The smooth & velvet sward my fancy suits, A54 408; A57 R20; T II 306; MC 459; MP IV 309

The snow falls deep; the Forest lies alone, T II 379; JR 102; EF 114; LP 29; OA 278; W 165; GS 212; E 22

The snow has left the cottage top, SCVS 20AS 57; T I 298; GG 85

The snow is gone from cottage tops, A18 143; A29 R133; B3 39; SPP 50; EF 92; CC 60; SC (February); MP I 26

The snow yet lingers in the fretting thaw (stray couplet), MP II 336

The snows are gone or nearly chance may show, A53; A54 432; MC 488; MP IV 345

The soldier full of battles & renown, A61 89; T II 352; NS 94

The soldiers, had they met with scars, B6 33

The solitary victor roams at will, MP II 328

The Songs of our land are they not worth reviving, C4 213; 20 II 343; LP 1000

The southwest wind how pleasant in the face, A40 20a; A42 18; A51 115; A54 354; D14 11; AS 86; T II 133; SPP 159; RM 117; MC 401; GS 61; E 8; MP IV 191

The southwest wind I love the sudden sound, MP III 143

The sparrow chirps the spring begun, 7 21; NS 47

[the sparrows built: see Here sparrows built upon the trees]

The spirit of Love is a beautiful thing, 20 I 278; LP 551

The spring comes cheery o'er the Scottish mountains, 20 I 331; LP 600

The Spring comes clad in green, 20 I 346; LP 613

The spring comes in with all her hues and smells, NG 138; T I 534; GG 117; X 56

The Spring comes in with smiling days, A31 92; MP II 97

The spring comes on daily, 20 I 306; LP 577

The spring flowers are under the hedges anew, C4 101; 20 II 280; LP 937

The spring had come in bits of green, B6 183

The spring has been here just one week, C4 19; 20 II 237; LPJC 239; LP 893

The spring has brought its blessing love, A10 9; EP II 431

The spring is come & spring flowers coming too, D24; T II 425; PJCM 224; JR 118; TSP 342; LP 1104

The Spring is come and winters gone, C4 121; 20 II 290; LPJC 257; LP 948

The spring is come forth, but no spring is for me, 20 I 110; Ch 237; T II 475; JR 125; LPJC 169; X 116; LP 394; OA 359; GS 319

The spring is coming by a many signs, 59 90; T II 309; JR 90; LPL 1; NS 9

The Spring is coming round the skirted wild wood, 20 I 94; LP 375

The spring is gone the summer beauty wanes, A10 6a; VM II 181; T I 271; EP II 425

The spring it beams sweet on the green linnets wing, 20 I 351; LP 618

The spring may forget that he reigns in the sky, D20 2; 6 13; PJCM 107; LPJC 51; X 154; OA 293; LP 57; B 82; C 82

The spring of life is o'er with me, 20 I 241; Ch 216; T II 501; LP 518

The spring returns the gushing [or drizzling] rains, A40 46; 3 200; EP II 197

The spring returns the pewet screams, A36 15; A40 187; A54 285; 17 166; T II 79; SPP 37; TSP 189; RM 65; MC 315; GS 143; E 61; MP IV 34

The spring with pleasure's happy pledge (fragment), A59 76

The Springs come for good now, C4 355; 20 II 426; T II 494; LP 1076

The Spring's coming on, my dear, 20 I 118; LP 403

The starnel builds in chimneys from the view, B9 60; BN 33; JCB 22; NS 23

The stepping stones that stride the meadow's streams, A41 49; A54 365; B6 R225; SPP 159; RM 140; MC 414; GS 87; MP IV 221

The stonecrop that in summer comes (fragment), A39 28

The storm is heaving up the sky, A59 88; MaC 89; T II 263

The storm is past a weary storm, A41 52; MP II 149

The stranger meets a many folks & knows, A61 45; NS 66

The stranger set his hawking basket down, B9 83; NS 39

The stranger, striding down the paths of spring, A59 103; T II 330; EF 113

The stray path rambles through the furze, A59 31; B6 169; MaC 72; T II 296

The sudden burst of many bells (fragment), A59 87

The sulphur hued primrose, C4 37; 20 II 245; LPJC 244; LP 902

The sultry day it wears away, 3 160; VM I 107; T I 254; EP II 109

The summer bringeth such excess of joy (fragment), A57 2

The summer flower has run to seed, A5 43; B2 141; VM I 86; T I 169; YULG (1956) 34; EP II 73

The summer is waining, 20 I 80; LP 360

The summer landscape leaves the lingering eye (deleted fragment), A46 180; MP II 162

The summer lovely beauty wears, A28 8; B4 107; MP II 185

The summer morn is beautifull In crimson and in blue, C3 439; 20 II 226; PJCM 199; X 186; LP 884

The summer rose in loves own hue, C4 293; 20 II 390; TSP 333; LP 1043; K 85

The summer she is gone her book is shut, A48 12; A54 207; MC 222; GS 69; MP III 489

[The summer time in summer's prime: see The Simmer time in simmer's prime]

The summer was delicious and the time (fragment), A57 9

The summers morning sun creeps up the blue, A59 91; MaC 19; T II 315; GG 170; X 62; NS 10

The sun had gaen down on the mountain sae lofty, 20 I 297; LP 569

The sun had grown on lessening day, A40 39a etc; A54 282; B4 R60 etc; T I 417; SPP 42; RM 97; MC 311; GS 132; MP IV 28; K 24

The sun had stooped his westward clouds to win, A41 37; A54 361; AS 88; T I 538; SPP 138; RM 137; MC 409; OA 131; GS 72; MP IV 210

The sun has gone down with a veil on his brow, 6 5; 8 14; LPJC 36; OA 280; LP 42; C 40

The sun is a setting the dews they are wetting, 20 II 119; C3 233; LP 783

The sun is gone the shut of evening flowers, H23; LP 234

The sun is hanging all so bright and high (fragment), B5 66; Pfz. 198, 26 (ClJ 342)

The sun is leaning on the mornings lap, 17 9; MP II 300

The sun is shining on the leaves, C4 249; 20 I 130; 20 II 365; LP 1021

The sun like the last look of love, 20 I 144; PJCM 137; GG 220; LP 431

The sun lookd out the dreary scene to bless, A40 51; B2 247; C2 52a; 4 55; EP II 312

The sun looks down in such a mellow light, A54 412; A57 27; T II 307; MC 464; GS 55; MP IV 314

The sun looks from a cloudy sky, 20 I 49; OA 346; LP 325; B 103

The sun looks oer the willows & pursues, 17 4; MP II 297

The sun lowly sinking behind the far trees, B1 26; D1 1; EP I 465

The sun no sooner bids farewell but night, A50 R47; B9 R28; MP II 226

The sun now sinks behind the woodland green (Rural Evening), A9 R16; VM II 73; NG 55; T I 209; JC [inside back cover]; OA 70; W 74; EP II 636

The sun of noon hangs in his highest skys (stray couplet), MP II 33

The sun seemed resting on the hill (fragment), A59 82; T II 66

The sun takes delight to shine on her gown, C4 349; 20 II 422; LP 1072

The sun, the shower, the clouds, the air, 20 I 86; LP 368

The sun was low sinking behind the far trees, PD 105; T I 100

The sun was shining o'er the hill, 20 I 129; LP 415

The sunbeams twinkling thro disparting boughs, B2 136; EP II 63

The sunday cloaths wait on the chair, MP II 246

The sunday was warm and the blue and brown skippers, 20 I 332; LP 601

The sunset even of a winter's day, A57 13; T II 304

The sunshine bathes in clouds of many hues, A40 40; A54 384; B4 63; AS 125; T I 518; JR 36; SPP 127; WS 22; MC 433; OA 102; GS 54; MP IV 261

The sunny end of March is nigh, 20 I 195; LPJC 179; OA 371; LP 480

The swallow watches on the chimney top, A46 180; MP II 306

The sweet spring now is come'ng, 19 25; LPJC 105; OA 328; LP 171

The sweetest joy life's pleasure hath (fragment), A39 31

The tame hedge sparrow hops about for seed, B9 85; NS 41

The tame hedge sparrow in its russet dress, A40 180; A46 144; A54 371; T II 243; BP 96; MC 420; OA 233; W 145; GS 101; MP IV 237

The tawny prophets of the lusty summer (fragment), A21 8

The tears of dew night leaves, 20 I 76; T II 465; LP 357

The thistle down's flying Though the winds are all still, C3 275; 20 II 142; T II 411; LPJC 185; JR 114; TSP 304; X 48; OA 405; LP 806; GS 345; PR 88

The thistle wears its heavy knobs of bloom, B5 92

The thorn tree it was hid with flowers, A50 R53; MP II 233

The thorn tree just began to bud, A13 R28; MP II 232

The thresher he had gen it up, A16 40; EP II 500

The thrush in the firdeal is singing till e'en, C4 393; 21 II 450; TSP 340; LP 1098

The thunder mutters louder & more loud, 19 58; OA 333; LP 194; V 167; B 98

The time is coming & it shall come, D10 1; MP II 295

The town smoke thickens in the morns young light (fragment), B4 R102; MP II 270

The traveller journeys on the road alone, A61 60; MaC 38; T II 359; NS 75

The traveller pulls his hat before his face, A61 123; NS 107

The triple elm decayed and dead atop (fragment), A59 102a

The tresses of thy glossy hair, 20 I 16; MaC 77; T II 460; PJCM 112; X 184; LP 286

The turkeys wade the close to catch the bees, B9 72; T II 335; EF 110; BP 113; OA 273; NS 33

The turnips wanted scaring & the boy, A61 88; NS 92

The type of innocence, snow-clothed blossom, 4 32

The upward look and ever anxious eye, C3 186; 20 II 97; LP 760

The very shore of shore I see, 19 23; PJCM 141

The very winds that passed where thou didst dwell (fragment), A42 103

The village gathers round the ancient cross, 7 31; NS 49

The village sleeps in mist from morn till noon, A18 7; A20 69; B3 32; SCVS 88; AS 70; T I 335; TSP 102; OA 139; SC (November); W 119; PM 101; MP I 144; B 33

The visions of love are as true as the season, 20 I 169; LP 458

The voice of the nightingale (fragment), B4 47

The voice of woods and streams was in her looks (fragment), B4 69

The vulgar follow up and down, A61 26

The wagtail flies about wi' her snow white throat, C3 164; 20 II 86; LP 748

The wagtails up the furrows run (fragment), A59 76

The war is of every kind comfort bereft me, A10 14a; 32 25; L 88; EP II 442

The water elder is in flower, 20 I 58; LP 337

The water lilys on the meadow stream, A59 85; B6 31; T II 128; JR 65; RM 104; T II 128; MP IV 587

The Water Lilies, white and yellow flowers, T II 382; PJCM 56; JC [10]; WS 29; LP 25; OA 278; W 164

The wealthy dolt for wit and sense (fragment), A42 105

The weary mower on the meadow path (fragments), B7 64

The weary woodman rocking home beneath, A54 402; A57 R110; T II 242; SPP 68; TSP 216; BP 95; CC 45; MC 452; OA 209; GS 100; MP IV 299

The weeders go to weed the wheat, A61 33

The weeders waiting till the lands where dry, A61 111; NS 100

The weeds are dressing ready here, 7 33; NS 49

The weeds beside the hedge dance (fragment), T II 382

The week before Easter, the days long and clear, A40 90a; B4 26; B7 17; 18 5; Ch 324; T II 152; FT 92; MP IV 417

The whip was shook but she delayd to strike (stray line), MP II 335

The whisper in the dark to hear (fragment), MP II 335

The white owl screamed, the clock struck nine, A6 26

The white thorn is budding and rushes are green, C4 133; 20 II 296; Ch 167; LP 954

The white-nosed bee has left his hole, A46 146

The whitethorn hedges bring with May (fragment), A59 82

The wild duck from the bulrush forest springs (fragment), B6 155

The wild duck startles like a sudden thought, A61 49; MaC 59; T II 339; GG 171; X 50; BP 116; CC 24; OA 267; NS 69

The wild flowers showed all colours far and wide (fragment), D18 2

The wild hedge-rose it blooms so fair, 20 I 143; LP 430

The wild hedge rose, its a bonny flower, PM 71

The wild rose swells its prickly buds anew, A18 77; A21 23; A48 26; A54 395; MC 433; MP IV 282

'the willow shaded Lane', 20 I 313; LP 584

The wind blows happily on every thing, 19 76; OA 335; LP 205

The wind blows high and the wind blows low And I wist not where to be, C3 207; 20 II 106; LP 769

The wind blows the trees about, 20 I 320; OA 388; LP 590

The wind-fanned daisies show the early spring,

The wind fanned daisys show the early spring, C4 33; 20 II 244; PJCM 202; LP 901

The wind suthers softly Among the green bushes, C3 385; 20 II 194; LPJC 234; LP 859

The wind that shakes the rushes Upon the thistley crowded green, C3 245; 20 II 125; LPJC 216; LP 790

The wind that so troubles the midsummer grass (fragment), A51 115

The wind waves oer the meadows green, C4 39; 20 II 246; T II 487; PJCM 202; GS 348; LP 903

The wind-fanned daisies: see The wind fanned daisys

The winding river glitters, 20 I 30, 47a; LP 323

The winds & waters are in his command, A39 24; A50 R60; T II 97; X 195; MP II 238

The winds blow softly strong And the trees are tossed about, C3 181; 20 II 95; PJCM 180; LP 758

The wing of the blackbird is the hue of her hair, 20 I 84; LP 365

The winter comes & scarse can keep him warm, A61 67; NS 79

The winter comes I walk alone, 20 I 213; T II 517; PJCM 150; LC 68; OA 374; LP 496; V 169

The winter it is past, B4 39; FT 120; MP II 258

The winter stays till e'en & the spring it canna cum, 19 65; LPJC 125; LP 198

The winter time is over love, 19 18; LPJC 102; LP 169

The winter wind with strange & fearful gust, A54 435; B6 63; T II 327; SPP 155; GS 46; MC 491; MP IV 352

The winter winnowed chill And fast came down the snow, C3 158; 20 II 83; LPJC 207; LP 744

The wise & good shall not deride, B1 20; D4 4; EP I 478

The wood anemonie through dead oak leaves, 20 I 214; T II 439; LPJC 180; LP 497; OA 375; GS 323; PM 59

The wood is sweet--I love it well, WS 79, LPL 8

The woodbine in the hedge row smells beautiful o' thee, C3 391; P 861

The woodland swamps with mosses varified, A40 191; A54 373; SPP 141; CC 36; MC 422; NH 315; GS 74; PM 31; MP IV 240

The woodlark rises from the coppice tree, A54 417; A57 36; T II 240; BP 90; OA 235; MC 470; JCB 40; MP IV 321

The woodman humming takes his homeward track, A31 21

The woodman tramples through the woodland ways (fragment), A57 51

The wood mans axe renews its hollow stroke, 17 6; JR 63; T II 126; MP II 299

The woods are all colours and bright is the sun, 20 I 147; LP 434

[the woods fresh greenness beautifuly burns: see the woods tanned greeness]

The woods how lovely with their crowds of trees, A54 408; A57 R19; MC 459; MP IV 308

The woods tanned greeness beautifully turns, A25 R26; 17 18; MaC 22; T II 150; EP II 588

The word I would breathe in thy ear, C4 373; 20 II 439; LP 1087

The world is taking little heed, A61 28; T II 375; X 196

The world, its hopes, and fears, have pass'd away, T I 283; TSP 64

The worlds vain mouth is wide and opens more, A57 12; A59 91; NS 10

The wormwood, burdock and the silk henbane (fragment), A21 16

The year, tho' young begins to shoot, A40 75; B7 36; MP IV 385

The years pass away (fragment), A50 R48

The yellow lamb toe I have often got, A11 10a; B2 274a; VM II 198; T I 278; EP II 384

The yellow leaves are falling round the bushes every one, 20 II 416; LP 1066

The yellow trees had lost their green, LP 260

The yonder clouds o'er wrestling skies, C3 375

The young and cannie maiden canna gang by her ain gate, 19 66

The young sun is gleaming, MP II 319

Thee I love and ever will bonnie Lassie O, C3 183; 20 II 96; LP 759

[Their cheating knavery like contagion...: see The Parish hind oppressions humble slave]

[Then comes the meadows where I love to see: see O poesys power thou overpowering sweet]

Then for a while earth's troubles all fled by (fragment), A42 104

Then from the mist top of the far watched hill, EP I 370

Then God half angered ansered Job aright, 6 30; 7 27; LP 122; C 73

Then here's to the flowers in the desert of care (fragment), A51 113

Then mark the little brook wind on and on (fragment), A51 22

Then oer some arches intersecting walls, A54 411; A57 26; MC 462; MP IV 312

Then on the barley's beard he sits to rest (fragment), B5 73

Then one with fingers linked will shadow plain (fragment), A51 87; A57 R100

Then put on thy kirtle & high the[e] away (stray line), MP II 269

Then said Solomon the Lord hath made known, 6 26; LP 117; C 63

Then sweet spring water to the thirsty swain (fragment), A51 35

There are days to remember, B4 74; MP II 314

There are unnoticed spots on earth, A54 237; A57 R118; MC 254; MP III 538

There is a beauty upon womans face, A18 73; A41 34; MP II 137

There is a breath--indeed there is, A54 254; A57 45; T II 259; MC 275; MP III 561

There is a charm in nature felt and seen, 20 I 198; PJCM 145; WS 18; LP 483

There is a charm in Solitude that cheers, 20 I 326; PJCM 159; GG 224; OA 390; LP 596; V 178

There is a charm which poesy lays hold of nought beside, A11 12; B2 275; EP II 386

There is a chasm in the heart of man, LP 165

There is a cruelty in all, D15; A58; 29; NH, 313n7; NS 4

There is a day a dreadfull day, 19 22, 30; LPJC 108; LP 175; OA 330; W 192; E 78; B 96

There is a feeling nought can calm, 19 56; LPJC 121; LP 193

There is a flower, a lovely [or 'tender'] flower, A11 12; B2 275

[There is a hidden history in the trees: see There is an hidden..]

There is a hope for all who live, 20 I 57; LP 336

There is a house stands in a lonely way, A61 103; MaC 39; T II 359; JR 99; X 85; NS 96

There is a land, I ken it weel, 20 I 273; LP 546

There is a land of endless joy, 20 I 303; LP 574

There is a land of endless life, 20 1 299; LP 570

There is a language wrote on earth and sky, A51 106; T II 39; LC 38; TSP 184

There is a lovely spot, forsooth the wind, A31 98A

There is a maid, and she to me, C3 15; 20 II 8; LP 673

There is a parting with more joy than pain (fragment), A39 31

There is a path, a little path (fragment), A18 271; A46 148

There is a place scarce known that well may claim, A61 80; NS 87

There is a rapture when the spring begins (fragment), A21 15A

There is a secret in my breast, A40 83a; MP IV 394

There is a small woodpecker red & grey, B9 69; BN 45; OA 272; JCB 18; W 157; NS 31

There is a Star I know it well, 19 126; 20 I 124; LPJC 132; LP 208

There is a stranger comes with may, A46 156; A47 15; T II 227; PL 66; MP II 173

There is a sweet something, a beautiful peace, A59 11

There is a tender flower, A40 84a; A54 278; B4 4; RM 95; MC 304; MP IV 17

There is a thicket of familiar face, A40 181; A46 149; A54 193; B5 R82; T II 62; BP 31; MC 207; MP III 466

There is a thought in every human breast, 20 I 254; LP 529

There is a vague oblivion dark & vast, A57 62; B6 22; Pfz Misc 198; MaC 86; T II 303; MP IV 586

There is a valued though a stubborn weed, A41 46; B6 R227; T II 108; RM 129; MC 411; MP IV 216

There is a viper that doth hide its head, A41 49; A54 364; B6 R225; T II 109; RM 130; MC 413; MP IV 219

There is a voice I love to hear, C3 267; 20 II 138; LP 802

There is a wild & beautiful neglect, A54 402; A57 R121; T II 326; MC 452; GS 80; MP IV 299

There is a wilderd spot delights me well, B2 120; VM II 167; T I 264; EP II 29

There is an hidden history, in the trees, C4 81; 20 II 268; PJCM 205; X 79; LP 925

There is glory in childhood, A42 51

There is sweet feelings every soul can feel, A11 7a; EP II 459

There lies a sultry lusciousness around, A48 10; A54 395; B5 92; T II 328; MC 444; GS 39; MP IV 285

There may be sweeter charms than thine (fragment), A31 14

There peeps the wood stile with its ivy wreath, MP II 227

There still I see thee fold thy mantle grey (fragment), D14 5

There was a time hed lookd above his lot, MP II 32

There was a time when loves young flowers, A10 4; VM II 136; T I 256; EP II 421

There was the thorn and the stile it hung over, 20 I 136; LP 422

There was three ravens sat upon a tree, EP I 556

There will be a time from thy lover deserted, A11 R11; A13 29; EP II 463

There's a bonny place in Scotaland, C4 173, Ch 174

There's a flower in the wilderness blooming unknown, C4 253; 20 I 233; 20 II 367; LP 510

There's a gladness of heart in the first days of Spring, 20 I 139; LPJC 171; OA 364; LP 424

There's a little odd house by the side of the Lane, 19 70; LPJC 127; LP 201

There's a rustle in the laneside spinney (fragment), A57 3

Theres beauty in the intercourse of nature with her kind, 20 I 128; LP 414

Theres beauty in the summer flower, 10 112; LPJC 159; LP 256; FT 163

Theres many heart acheth, EP II 528

Theres many worships loves first flowers, MP II 255

There's mony dear things i' the land we live in, C3 145; 20 II 79; LP 738

Theres more then music in this early wind, A40 182; A51 73; A54 369; T II 139; SPP 153; RM 143; MC 418; GS 32; MP IV 232

There's music in the songs of birds, 20 I 328; LP 598

Theres nelly my rose & theres philly my lilly, A40 46a; B2 205; EP II 208

There's not a hid or secret rout, B5 R22; D14 14

There's not a land the sea surrounds, 20 I 33; LP 306

Theres not a pleasure half so blest, A12 8; EP II 465

Theres not a stone that lies upon the road, MP II 288

There's nothing so sweet as the woodlands green and modest anemone a stooping, C3 125; 20 II 71; LP 728

There's places in our village streets, C3 303; 20 II 155; T II 477; LPJC 223; OA 405; LP 819

There's pleasure in all the sun shines on, 20 I 89; LP 371

Theres pleasure on the pasture lea, 19 42; 20 I 184; LPJC 114; LP 184

There's some will run and make a fuss (fragments), B6 193

Theres some with a bottle will rub off the thorn, A10 R19a; EP II 451

There's something more to fill the mind, B6 27

Theres somthing quite [or so] refreshing to behold, A54 413; A57 27; T II 328; LC 51; MC 465; MP IV 315

Theres somthing rich & joyful to the mind, A54 414; A57 31; T II 322; MC 466; MP IV 317

There's sun in the dew blebs, 20 I 203; LP 486

Theres the daisey the woodbine, A10 12a; AS 38; VM II 138; T I 257; EP II 438

There's the sparrow, a troublesome sort of guest (fragment), A59 82; B6 82

There's the voices of Spring, 20 I 123; LP 409

Theres the wide spreading heath and its crowds of furze bushes, 20 I 263; PJCM 154; LP 537

These birds, how happy must they be, A47 24; A51 75; T II 238; BP 87

These buried Ruins now in dust forgot, A3 87; B1 142; 5 63; PD 47; T I 53; EP I 402

These childern of the sun which summer brings, A40 20a etc; A46 188; A54 186; AS 130; T II 17; JR 48; MC 200; OA 121; GS 114; MP III 453

These insects all are passing bye, MP II, 109

These little indoor dwellers in cottages and halls, C3 185; 20 II 97; T II 427; JR 120; TSP 309; CC 22; LP 760

These little poets of the sunny fields, A46 147

These paintings, why they mock as if they spoke, LP 240

[These tiny loiterers...: see Thou tiney loiterer on the barleys beard]

These to village task agree, 1 236

'These trees aspire in height as if to taunt the sky, MP II, 318

These two had been friends in Youth, 19 17; LP 169

These vague allusions to a country's wrongs, A40 137; D10 8; T II 117; TSP 194; W 136; MP IV 506

They ask me who I love the best, A61 91

They could not drain the cellars dry (fragment), A46 138

They eat the clothes from off my back, 7 39

They gathered round thee every day, MP II, 330

They gi' me eight pence by the day (fragment), B6 166

They loo na me because I'm poor I' woolen hoes and clouted shoes, C4 1; 20 II 229; LP 887

They may boast as they will over pleasures [re]past, A40 120; A54 275; MC 300; L 510; MP IV 8

They may say what they will upon love, A10 17a; EP II 449; JCSJ 4 44

They may talk about flowers of the summer's perfume, 17 120

They met at eve & as they met the last (deleted fragment), MP II 33

They near read the heart, 6 15; 7 47; LPJC 53; OA 294; LP 59; C 70

They pelt about the snow the birds to scare, A61 81; NS 87

They rapp'd the door, then listened--nothing came (fragments), A44 11; A46 142

They stand no more to rest 'em o'er their pales, 1 34

They stood to blow the eggs & rest awhile, B9 62; NS 25

Theyre spotted like the sparrow paler grey, B9 73; BN 49; NS 34

This bird is so far famed to be, A58 7; BN 39

This braying fool with pompous pen, A45 20; MP II 151

This emblem of an horses tooth, A37 43; B7 77; MP II 111

This happy spirit of the joyous May, D9 36

This hill on which I rest me now, EP I 358

This is the month, the Nightingale, clod brown, 20 I 90; Ch 194; T II 443; PJCM 123; TSP 289; X 94; BP 130; OA 355; LP 372; E 47

This leaning tree with ivy overhung, A49 37; A53 68; MP II 211

This life is made of lying and grimace, 7 49; C 74 [from Child Harold]

This love, I canna' bear it, 20 I 7; T II 520; PJCM 123; TSP 289; X 171; OA 338; LP 277; V 164

This love, wrong understood (Love's pains), X 17

This morning just as I awoken, A3 117; A40 149; B1 R180; PD 62; T I 89; EP I 142

This passion to love thee I cannot conceal, C4 107; 20 II 283; LPJC 255; LP 941

This scene how beautious to the musing mind, A3 57 etc; B1 111; 1 103; 5 116; LM (Jan 1820) 10; PD 133; T I 117; TSP 24; OA 6; EP I 150

This visionary theme is thine, A40 72a; A54 154; B3 98; 32 70; SPP 36; MC 165; L 265; GS 125; MP III 370; K 86

This world has suns but they are overcast, A15 R8; 7 95; VM II 166; T I 264; EP II 493

This world hath naught of substance or reality, 7 91

[Tho...: see Though... or Thou...]

Those rude old tales--mans memory augurs ill, A40 193; A54 372; T II 142; RM 145; MC 421; MP IV 239

Those stepping stones, that stride the meadow streams, T II 137

Those sweet excesses which will start (fragment), A57 R10

[Those wrecky stains dart on the floods away: see Whose wrecky stains]

[Those tiney loiterers: see 'Thou tiney loiterer...']

Thou art gone the dark journey, A40 100; A54 177; B4 77; GG 133; SPP 33; MC 189; OA 187; E 64; B 51; MP III 435

Thou art thy self alone thy monument (stray line), MP II 336

Thou delicate and beautiful and fair (fragment), A59 99; B6 147

Thou grand existing soul of life & all, B2 120a; EP II 30

Thou hermit haunter of the lonely glen, A54 409; A57 22; T II 243; SPP 69; BP 97; MC 460; CC 5; OA 208; W 138; GS 99; B 57; MP IV 309

Thou king of half a score dominions, A59 57

Thou little insect infinitely small, A3 99; B1 159; 1 24a; 5 47; PD 130; T I 117; EP I 40

Thou little thing, B6 166

Thou little, tiny, nameless thing, A59 35

[Thou lovely bud: see lovely bud with many weeds surrounded]

Tho[u] lovly flower round thee the storm is brewing, B2 245; C2 48; 4 47; EP II 308; K 26

Thou lovely one thy witching face, A54 332; B8 R114; MC 373; MP IV 136

Thou lovely shade of heavenly birth, A22 4; A40 69; A54 201; MaC 84; T I 415; MC 215; MP III 477; K 34

Thou lowly cot where first my breath I drew, A5 11; B2 253a; C2 51a; 4 53; VM II 152; T I 128; LC 23; OA 43; EP II 28; B 18

Thou maiden Flower o' Scotish land, 20 I 314; LP 585

Thou moon crazd man, EP I 372

Thou page of [living] beauty can the eye, A40 80; A51 33; A54 386; MC 435; MP IV 266

Thou power from whom all pleasure springs, A40 198; B8 89; MaC 91; T II 102

Thou power of powers, thou king of kings, A40 195; B8 97; D16 3; Pfz Misc 198; MP IV 569

Thou sacred light that right from wrong discerns, A5 7; C2 44; 4 37; PD 150; T I 126; EP I 444

Thou soothing spell whose wildly simple song, A31 2; A41 24; B4 R98; 17 34; MP II 135

Thou soul of edens joys whose birth forgot (fragment, 'To the Flower'), D8 R2; MP II 295

Thou spirit of creation breathing still, A30 2; A40 70a; B8 R24; T II 118; EP II 601

Thou sunshine in my calmer sky, 20 I 50; LP 326

Thou tiney loiterer on the barleys beard, A40 189; A51 86 etc; A54 191; AS 85; T II 17; JR 47; SPP 84; WS 72; TSP 184; X 89; RM 80; MC 205; OA 189; GS 115; PM 29; MP III 462

Thou virgin bliss the seasons bring, A40 73a; A54 152; MC 163; L 219; MP III 367

Thou warble wild of rough rude melody, B1 73; D4 1; PD 153; AS 13; T I 127; EP I 477

Thou wert earths only happiness with me (stray line), MP II 336

Thou wert my life when hope borrowed light (fragment), A31 13

Thou winter thou art keen intensly keen, B2 245; C2 49a; 4 49; VM I 197; T I 237; EP II 307

Though Chloe from her Colin strays, C1 22a; 1 75; 4 106; EP I 103

Tho' creeds may differ every different sect (fragment), B7 52

Tho expirienc's pupils pay dear to be wise, 1 247; EP I 343

Tho envys sneer woud fain bereave, MP II 9

Tho fairer faces may be met, A50 R56; MP II 236

Tho false virtue disaproves thee--, A4 21; A11 11a; B1 69; EP I 441

Tho fate & fortune both combines, 1 221; EP I 304

Tho' fine proved the morning, O sad proved the ramble, C2 58; 1 153; 4 65; EP I 218

Tho Ive sung in rambles cheery, A30 160; A54 318; B6 R60; MP II 65

Though lifes rude floods with sudden roar, A40 20; A53 17; A54 140; MC 150; MP III 346

Though low my lot my wish is won, A40 85a; A54 119; B7 48; T II 189; RM 84; MC 128; MP III 300

[Though, looly flower: see Tho[u] lovly flower round thee the storm is brewing]

Tho' my love never comes in love's disguise, A31 R181

Though now I seem so full of clack, B6 133

Though oer the darksome northern hill [Last of March], A13 6; B5 49f; VM II 118; LM (Nov, 1821) 341; T I 222; OA 93; W 80; EP II 471

Though terrors face blackens, MP II 192

Tho' the king was on his throne (fragment), D14 3v

Tho thou wert not the place of my being & birth, A30 141; B7 R25a; MP II 55

Tho' titles, power, and riches and estate (fragments), B7 51

Tho winter comes dreary, A40 75; A54 156; B7 37; MC 167; L 434; MP III 373; K 42

Though years may part my love from me, 20 I 271; LP 544; K 88

Tho years pass away, A18 76; MP II 267

[Th]oughts of thy beauty gilded in my mind (fragment), A42 104

Thourt [?the] dearest to my bosom, 6 45, 49; LPJC 66; OA 305; LP 73; C 120

Thou'rt mine Love, in gladness, 20 I 14; LP 284

Thousands of miles have I gangd heavy hearted, A10 1a; EP II 417

Thoust been to me a friend indeed, A21 1; A30 75; A40 68a; B8 R28; 32 70; T II 93; RM 153; L 271; MP IV 383

Thou'st heard rude knaves abusing those in power (fragment), A26 R2

Three seasons have gone--sin' my shepherd did leave me, A40 177; A46 144; A54 281; MC 309; MP IV 26

Three suns had gilt the cottage top, A10 8; EP II 429; JCSJ 4 44

Three times sweet awthorn I have met thy bower, A16 R70; B2 216; VM I 141; T I 234; EP II 231

Three years ago myself and Sally Grey, Pfz. 198, 17 19 (ClJ 94); MP I 189

Thrice welcome here again thou fluttering thing, A11 12a; B2 275a; VM II 206; T I 282; EP II 386

Thrice welcome sweet summer in softness returning, A16 1; B2 204a; EP II 207

Thrice welcome to thy slumbering peace O Grave, 1 149; EP I 215

Thrice Welcome to thy song sweet warbling thrush, 11 409; EP I 515

Thro bushes & briars unheeded I go, B7 24; FT 185; MP II 279

Thro bushes & briars when I took my way, B7 24; FT 185; MP II 278

Thus accoutered for begging both hungry and weary, Yale Osborn Collection (ClJ 346); YULG 31 (1956), 31

Thus rumour kept adding her story to truth (fragment), D14 2

Thus saith the great, high and lofty one (fragment), D20 1

Thy beauty thro my life hath been, EP II 531

Thy bonny smile thy inky hair, C4 399; 20 II 417; LP 1067

Thy eye can witness more then others, 7 41; EP I 505

Thy glance is the brightest, 20 I 3; Ch 188; LP 272

Thy lovely face had beauty's sweetest thrill (fragment), A42 104

Thy mercy covers earth and sky, A59 97; B6 101

Thy smiles are dear [or 'sweet'] to him that needs thy smiles, A21 3; L 268; EP II 521

Thy spirit visits me like dew, 20 I 256; LP 530; K 89

Thy tender bosom weeps indeed [or 'melts to trace'], A50 R38; MP II 324

Thy worldly hopes & fears have pass'd away, A13 11; VM II 207; L 174; EP II 476

Time does and undoes and with cheating eyes, B7 55; Pfz. 198, 27 8 (ClJ 402)

Till weary night her ebon curtain draws (stray line), MP II 243

Time robs us of our joys we sigh, MP II 322

Time's stream in light is flowing, A57 R84; T II 271

Times tide how swift its current flows, A40 79; A54 125; MC 134; MP III 311

Timid and shy, and full of maiden fears, 7 83

Timid & smiling beautiful & shy, A61 112; T II 347; NS 101

Timid as the bird complains, A11 10; B2 273a; EP II 380

'Tis a beautiful morning, the sunshine is out, A53; A57 R101

'Tis April and the morning love, 20 I 41, 226; TSP 299; LP 313

Tis autumn now & harvests reign, LP 12

Tis autumn now & natures scenes, 6 17; T II 397; PJCM 103; LPJC 57; OA 298; LP 64; B 83; C 88

Tis Autumn wild the swim[m]ing clouds Pass low and lowery o'er the green, C3 191; 20 II 99; LPJC 209; LP 763

'Tis beautiful sunshine and beautiful skies, 20 I 209; PJCM 147; LP 492

Tis evening, the black snail has got on his track, 20 I 31; Ch 218; AS 162; T II 417; LPJC 166; EF 130; LP 304; V 173; GS 274; PR 91

Tis evening the sky is one broad dim of gray, 20 I 240; OA 380; LP 517

'Tis glorious spring; I sit me down, 20 I 59; T II 403; LP 338

Tis haytime & the red complexioned sun, A41 47; A54 364; B6 R231; T I 540; RM 139; MC 412; OA 132; GS 56; PR 88; MP IV 218; K 46

'Tis late, the labouring men come dropping in, A61 50

Tis martinmass from rig to rig, T II 396; PJCM 104; LPJC 162; SPP 200; LP 103; OA 326; GS 268; C 121

'Tis May, and yet the skies are overcast, 20 I 99; PJCM 118; LP 382

Tis midsummer eve & the suns shut his eye [or 'in the west'], A49 29; MP II 202

'Tis night tis midnight--hark the horses tramp, MP II 124

Tis noon and in his hottest breath the sky, A57 R87

'Tis not gone for ever, 20 I 117; LP 402

Tis now the height o summer And where so e'er I turn my eyes, 20 II 73, 78; LPJC 205; LP 736

'Tis pity that distinctions confound, D13 3

Tis pleasant in our walks to meet with things, A54 423; B6 34; MC 477; MP IV 330

'Tis pleasant on a Sunday path to talk, B9 49; NS 18

Tis pleasant to bear reccolections in mind, A5 67; A24 20; A31 113; A40 37a; A54 182; 30 97; Ch 274; MC 194; MP III 444

Tis pleasant to walk by the green wood side, C3 265; 20 II 136; LP 801

'Tis pleasant underneath dark oaks to pass (fragment), A59 85

'Tis Saturday night, and my shepherd will come, A37 47; A54 316; AS 100; T II 94; JR 57; WS 87; MP IV 106; K 14

Tis spring day roams [or swarms] with flowers, A54 241; MaC 5; T II 284; GG 167; MC 258; MP III 543

Tis spring my love tis spring, 19 36; 20 I 34; Ch 133; NG 142; LPJC 111; LP 179

Tis Spring warm glows the South, D27; T II 426; PJCM 225; GG 235; TSP 343; BP 124; LP 1106; OA 427; W 199

Tis sunday & the little paths that wind, A54 405; A57 R105; MC 455; MP IV 303

Tis sweet to reccolect lifes past controuls, A9 R25; 7 71; 32 34; VM II 129; T I 240; L 128; EP II 413

Tis sweet to view as on we pass, A5 31; EP I 455

'Tis sweet with love to be alone, A59 29

Tis the time just as morning is breaking, EP I 383

Tis three years & a quarter sin I left my own fireside, C4 215; 20 II 344; T II 455; LP 1001

Tis valentine one throws her work away, 7; NS 52

Tis winter and I love to read indoors (The Winter's Come); X 52

Tis winter and the fields are bare and waste, CC 53; GS 252; C 122 [from Child Harold]

Tis winter plain the images around, A54 427; B6 59; SPP 142; MC 481; OA 195; GS 73; MP IV 336

Tis winter weather; up and down, A60 6; MaC 32; T II 356

To cringe to menial slaves (fragments), B7 38

To drop among green bushes in the spring, MP II 237

To hunt bird's nests on summer morns, A47 6; B8 31; T II 213

[To hunt her nest: see Accross the fallow clods at early morn]

To laugh at others & their faults expose, A3 110; A40 34a; B1 R174; 1 238, 239; 5 73; EP I 333

To lie among green bushes in the spring (fragment), D14 3

To live with others is not half so sweet (fragment), A62 R13

To lock up Water--must undoubted stand, C2 27; 1 6; 4 1; EP I 16

To look for luck to rise above ourselves, B5 79

To look on past joys tis the sun shine of memory, A10 10a; 22 7; EP II 433

To me hath poesy been a recompense, A57 63; B6 26; Pfz Misc 198; T II 303; MP IV 582

To me how wildly pleasing is that scene, A3 73; B1 124; 1 17; 5 126; PD 137; T I 116; OA 9; EP I 33

To meet the Breeze that fand the trees her snowy breast was bear, 1 172; EP I 241

To press that bosom's glowing breast, A28 33

To see the Arum early shoot, 20 I 288; LPJC 188; OA 387; LP 560

To see thee dress thy little doll, Pfz. 198, 22 (ClJ 367); MP II 350

To shut out sunny summer in the dull, B5 94

To sober wi sad truths the laughing mirth, A18 133; A29 R158; B3 11; SCVS 103; T I 462; CT 82; MP I 165

To stand the brunts of toil & stormy weather, EP I 504

[To thee earth swarmed with lovly things: see O Mary thou that once made all]

To thine & mine our topmost friend, 7 89; L 26; LM (Mar 1820) 3EP II 514

To turn from music [or pages] of this modern art, A54 356; B4 134; T I 258; MC 404; MP IV 197

To wish thee anguish worse then hell, B7 37; EP II 515

To yon low church with solemn sounding knell, A4 9; B1 148; 1 158; 5 11; PD 53; T I 27; EP I 223

Today with summer out-of-doors, A54 265; B6 68; MC 287; MP III 576

[Towpenny his wisdom is: see Twopenny Wittle his nature is]

Tree of the tawny berry rich though wild, A54 423; B6 34; MC 476; MP IV 329

True as the church clock hand the hour pursues, A20 7; A41 63; A54 166; AS 103; T I 384; SPP 30; MC 177; OA 133; W 112; E 23; MP III 414

True honour is the honesty of worth (deleted stray couplet), D14 12v, MP II 155

True love lives in absence, 20 I 114, 229; LP 398

True love the virgins first fond passion, B1 44; D4 11; PD 127; EP I 486

True poesy is not in words, A54 269; B6 45; T II 49; GG 139; TSP 186; MC 291; GS 163; MP III 581

Truth must be truth (fragment), C 35

Truth nowadays is deem'd a vile offence, A9 11

Truth old as heaven is & God is truth, A54 383; T II 111; RM 132; MC 432; MP IV 259

Truth urged too far from understanding flies (stray couplet), MP II 244

Turn again thou sweet beguiling, A10 4; EP II 422

Turnill (lov'd name) a clown would fainley send, C1 23; 1 75; 4 107; EP I 104

Turnill we toiled together all the day, A61 18; NS 56

Twas at the hours o evening when low descends the dew, C3 166; 20 II 87; PJCM 178; LP 749

Twas but a wild bramble that catchd at her gown, EP I 513

Twas in a summers morning I' the month of warm July, C3 219; 20 II 113; PJCM 182; LP 777

T'was in the midst of June, C3 101; 20 II 59; LP 717

T'was in the month of April when birds all merry sing, C3 103; 20 II 61; TSP 329; LP 718

Twas i' the morning early, C4 27; 20 II 240; T II 495; LPJC 240; TSP 323; LP 897

T'was in the summer time O' swallows, C3 109; 20 II 64; PJCM 175; LP 721

Twas just when early springs begin, 19 119; 20 I 181; LPJC 135; LP 212

Twas late at een when rob got ready, A16 2; EP II 269

'Twas Michaelmas, the fields were bare, A60 7

'Twas midsummer eve and the sun hid his head, A31 5

'Twas on a summer's morning, 20 I 379; PJCM 161; X 187; LP 645

Twas on an April morning, C3 331; 20 II 168; LP 833

'Twas on the Banks of Ivory, 18 29; Ch 348; T II 169; TSP 198; FT 130; MP IV 552

Twas on the 14th of Feburary, B7 23; FT 183; MP II 277

'Twas once upon a certain time (The Summons), A40 125; MP IV 482

'Twas somewhere in the April time, 20 I 398; Ch 165; AS 170; T II 448; LP 660

Twas sunday eve the sun was out of sight, A28 23; EP II 675

'Twas wi' sadness o' heart that my love and I parted, C4 163; 20 II 312; LP 971

Tween evenings farewell & the nights approach, A23 11; A40 73a; LM (Jul 1824) 55; T I 533; EP II 539

Tweet pipes the Robin as the cat creeps bye, A37 24; A52 5; A54 396; B8 86; AS 129; T II 246; BP 102; MC 445; OA 212; B 62; MP IV 287

Twilight meek nurse of dews, 19 123; 20 I 170; LPJC 134; LP 210

Two brothers that have been apart, A46 R46

Two forked sticks thrust in the ground (stray couplet), MP II 270

Two servants are seen in deep discourse, MP II 80

Twopenny Wittle his nature is & Twopenny his name is, EP I 234; AW 102

 

 

Unclouded rose the morning sun, A13 30; A14 3a; A30 90; A31 69; A53 85; A54 60; B8 R84; T I 387; MC 65; MP III 163

Under hedges the violets are coming in bloom, LP 267

Under the twigs the blackcap hangs in vain, A53 100; A54 433; T II 239; BP 89; MC 488; OA 232; JCB 55; B 68; MP IV 346

Unequal'd raptures happiest happiness, C1 24; 1 79; 4 110; EP I 110

Unriddle this riddle [or 'the riddle'], my own Jenny love, A41 6; B4 11; 18 27; Ch 346; T II 168; TSP 197; FT 80; JCSC 38; MP IV 550

'Unstable as water thou shall not excell' (stray line), MP II 150

Unthinking Gunner O forbear, C1 11; 1 135; EP I 201

Up crows the cock with bouncing bawl, A59 51; B6 115

Up ere the sun when earth and sky, A59 82

Up honesty, a vote of thanks, A59 13

Up like a princess starts the merry morn, A40 59a; A43 R93; A51 10 etc; A54 359; T I 538; RM 135; MC 407; MP IV 203

Up this green woodland ride lets softly rove, A40 178; A46 160 etc; A54 188; B5 71; NG 114; T II 213; JR 70; SPP 73; TSP 211; X 96; BP 41; RM 48; MC 201; OA 213; GS 108; E 47; B 58; MP III 456

Up wi ye drowsy drizzling muse, B2 203a; EP II 205

Upon a day a mery day, A36 7; A40 115a; A54 79; B7 39; B8 21; 30 98; Ch 251; MC 85; MP III 208

Upon an edding in a quiet nook, A40 186; A54 198; B5 76; T II 223; JR 74; X 100; BP 59; MC 212; OA 231; MP III 474

Upon the chimney tops, wake when I will (fragment), A50 20

Upon the collar of an hugh old oak, A54 253; A57 40; SPP 78; MC 273; OA 218; GS 102; MP III 559

Upon the common in a motely plight, A37 30; A54 226; B7 41; SPP 164; MC 242; MP III 520

Upon the gatepost sat the cat (fragment), A59 75

Upon the greensward by the woodside fall (fragment), A53; A57 11

Upon the hill of lambtoes & wild thyme (stray couplet), MP II 252

Upon the plain there livd a swain, A3 59; B1 112; 1 99; PD 113; EP I 138

Upon the sabbath sweet it is to walk, A11 12; B2 275; VM II 199; T I 279; JR 19; EP II 385

Upon the shady sward in meadow nook, A54 414; A57 29; MC 465; MP IV 316

Upon the smooth shorn bank, close by the brim (fragment), A57 2; A59 89

Upstairs he goes to where the cobbler lay, 1 109

 

 

Vain flattering hope while woes distress me, 1 22; EP I 37

Vetches; both yellow, and blue, C4 85; 20 II 270; LPJC 253; TSP 336; LP 928

Violet--thou art a lovly blossom, A5 20; EP I 455

Violets blue and white in March's hours (fragment), A59 76

Virtue's the shadow of a vanished race, B3 28

Vision of days gone by your memory dances, A23 R43; EP II 548

Vows made of words are mostly made amiss (fragment), A27 17; A39 31

 

 

Wandering by the rivers edge, A57 R14; T II 278; JR 83; X 82; OA 238; W 150

Want pinchd me keenly & scarce was hard labour, A10 3a; B2 277a; 22 5; EP II 393

Wants yet on every side as deep suround me, A5 R12; C2 51a; 4 53; EP I 454

Warm into praises kindling muse, B1 66; D4 3; VM II 58; T I 38; TSP 10; EP II 602

Warm passions of love first the maidens heart heaving, B2 124; EP II 38

Was I to tell you what I ail within, C1 20a; 1 67; 4 102; EP I 96

Was there ever such a hue, 19 105; LP 221

Wast thou a tyrant at whose frown the wind (fragment), A50 R58

Watching in that chill spot that wakend the gale, EP I 355

Waves trough--rebound--& fury boil again, A54 371; T II 141; X 52; RM 144; MC 420; OA 194; MP IV 236

We both have been by life deceived, A40 101a; MP IV 462

We had our Valentines cut full of hearts, Pfz. 198, 19 20 (ClJ 391); MP II 214

We heard the farmer shout & whoop, B9 54; NS 20

We little think when idle pleasures choose, MP II 216

[We loved thee Swordy Well: see Ive loved thee Swordy Well and love thee still]

We never know the sweets o' joy, 19 97; LPJC 146; LP 225

We pass the gypsies camp a noisey crew, B9 49; NS 18

We stood beneath the hazel shade, C4 377; 20 II 426; LP 1066

We thought of lone wood paths where silence rears, MP II 239

We took a walk & ventured out, A61 126; NS 107

We well may wonder o'er the change of scene, A40 70; LM (Oct 1821) 400; T I 516

We went a journey far away, B9 55; NS 46

We went accross where follows lay, B9; NS 2

Wealth, power and honour all the world contains (fragment), A45 28

Wearied with his lonely walk, A23 17; A30 21; A40 81 etc; A54 218; 7 9; T I 424; TSP 115; MC 233; GS 135; MP III 504

Weep not for the Israelites by Babels lone streams, 20 I 222; LP 503; JCSJ 4 26

Welcome gentle breathing Spring, C1 19 etc; 1 55; 4 100; EP I 83

Welcome old Maytey [or 'comrade'] peeping once again, A52 1; B1 37; D2 9; PD 79; NG 23; T I 81; EP I 135

Welcome pale primrose starting up between, A3 58; B1 111; 1 117; 5 5; LM (Jan 1820) 10; PD 134; T I 118; TSP 24; EP I 182; PM 61

Welcome red and roundy sun, C2 59a; 1 80; 4 68; VM II 55; AS 34; PCFM 69; T I 41; JR 3; LC 16; WS 50; X 72; EP II 19

Welcome sweet eve thy gently sloping sky, A23 9; A40 72; A54 392; T I 519; RM 133; MC 441; GS 47; PM 53; MP IV 277

Well have I learnd the value of vain life, A40 37; B1 38; EP I 506

Well honest John how fare you now at home, D24; T II 518; PJCM 223; JR 131; LC 69; TSP 342; X 208; LP 1102; OA 427; W 198; GS 361; E 91; B 126

Well in my many walks I rarely found, A46 155; A54 225; A56 R9; T II 219; BP 52; RM 79; MC 240; OA 229; W 139; GS 107; E 51; MP III 517

Well, now I see you jealous and must I (fragment), A20 R77

Well should I love thee, [ ] pray, A60 5

Well stop bill wi' dogging me so oer an' oer, C1 10; 1 132; EP I 196

Well tho' I had not time to tend her so (fragments), A31 R35

We'll follow fortune where we list (fragment), A50 R46

We'll ma' be meet no more bonny Lassie O, C3 81; 20 II 45; LP 708

We'll meet by the glen side we'll meet by the burn, C4 361; 20 II 430; LP 1079

We'll sit from morn till dewy eve, A48 1

We'll walk among the tedded hay, 20 I 100; OA 357; LP 382

We'll walk my love at eve unseen, C4 35; 20 II 244; LPJC 243; LP 901

Were we both in a mind (fragment), B6 109

[Were woodbines: see W[h]ere woodbines are wreathing & zephers are breathing]

What a night the wind howls hisses & but stops, A57 2; A59 89; T II 313; SPP 143; WS 36; GS 88; NS 7; PR 79

'What ails my love, where can he be', C1 9; EP II 609

What Antidote or charm on Earth is found, A3 63; B1 115; 5 127; PD 135; EP I 387

What are lifes joys & gains, A31 218; A32 10; A40 62; A54 84; D9; Ch 258; AS 138; NG 105; T II 181; RM 39; MC 91; L 315; MP III 219

What are those stars seen dropping from the sky, MP II 319

What beauties the summer discloses, C4 333; 20 II 414; PJCM 220; LPJC 275; LP 1064

What boots the toil to follow common [or 'haughty'] fame, A54 349; B7 59; 30 99; T II 105; RM 112; MC 395; MP IV 174

What charms does nature at the spring put on, B2 145a; VM II 185; T I 273; WS 20; EP II 82

What dangerful rascals the fellows all are, A3 33; A40 31; B1 R167; 1 131; 5 96; EP I 194

What envy whispers slander still approves (stray line), MP II 117

What happy thoughts the summer yields, LP 38; C 33

What is Love but pains disguise, 20 I 368; T II 471; LP 633

What is songs eternity?, A37 12; A40 197; B8 23; PCFM 95; T II 266; JR 80; TSP 224; X 73; OA 122; GS 161; CK 58; E 94; B 26

What is there in the distant hills, A59 60; B6 53; PCFM 91; T II 272; SPP 100

What is this honour pride extols so high, A40 58a; MP IV 382

What makes me love thee now thou dreary scene, B2 249; C2 50a; 4 51; VM II 205; T I 282; LC 32; EP II 319

What monstrous changes time and chance does bring, A9 10a

What no plain stone? to court the strangers eye, A6 9; EP I 456

What, not in love, where's reason to deny (fragment), A20 R77

What power again bids grasses grow, A11 5; EP II 458

What smiling still & blooming as of yore, A41 2; B4 124; MP II 129

What, still are ye silent, O fie on ye Robin, A46 R189

What time concludes the ploughmans many [or morning] broils, A9 R17; EP II 407

What time the cricket unmolested sings, B2 146; VM II 187; T I 274; EP II 84

What time the wheat field tinges rusty brown, A23 7; A24 18; A40 58; A54 389; B4 70; AS 127; T I 526; SPP 133; MC 438; OA 103; GS 32; E 8; MP IV 271

What time the woodlands hides the sun, A16 9; B2 225a; EP II 256

What trifles touch our feelings when we view, B2 150a; VM II 189; T I 275; EP II 92

What was expected is expected more, C3 237; 20 II 121; LPJC 215; LP 786

What wonder strikes the curious while he views, B2 132a; VM II 174; PCFM 85; T I 268; WS 75; LC 4; X 90; EP II 56; E 55

What would the rosey be but as the rose, A40 191; A54 367; MC 416; MP IV 228

Whats beautys love a sunny [or summers] shower, 32 38; L 141; EP II 597

Whats future fame a melody loud playing, A34 R5; A40 67a; A54 350; T II 107; TSP 193; RM 114; MC 396; L 308; MP IV 179

When a book Phil can borrow, he'll sure enough do't, A3 72; B1 124; 1 55; EP I 84

When a friend is absent from the hearth (fragment), D18 9

When apple-trees in blossom are, MP II 357

When April & dew brings primroses here, C4 235; 20 II 356; LPJC 267; LP 1013; V 183

When at the pond's steep verge she trembling stood, 1 37

When beauty fills the lover's eyes, T II 384; PJCM 58; X 199; LP 31

When Caudy maudys lived in the Fen, B3 R76; MP II 254

When childern mourned a peevish wound (fragment), MP II 271

When Chloe's gone then fancy lays, C2 68; 1 90; 4 116; EP I 122

When daylight is bidding bye And the green oats feel clammy to touch, C3 157; 20 II 83; LP 743

When deaths the sacrifice (stray phrase), MP II 334

When dews pearl the blossom, A14 3; EP II 491

When doubtful travellers uncertain roam, 1 154

When early day with nothing to adorn, A61 68; NS 79

When early march a sunny [or 'seeming'] pledge, A46 188; A47 17; MP II 175

When evening takes the night for mate, A30 151; A31 146; A40 149; The Champion 14 Dec 1830; MP IV 508

When every flower forsakes the garden walks (fragments), A18 R222

When expectation in the bosom heaves, A1 R128; PD 152; T I 127; EP I 353

When first the world & I shook hands, MP II 313

When first we hear the shy come nightingales, A59 95; B6 75; T II 310; WS 58; BP 109; NS 12

When freedom haild the produce of the plough (stray couplet) MP II 13

When from this vain World my spirit is Relieved, EP I 265

When frost chinks neath the foot like solid floors (deleted fragment), MP II 109

When gentle even oer the wild scene creeping, EP I 377

When grief hung o'er me like a cloud, A37 28; A53 75 etc.

When honest worth born down beneath the weight, A3 95; A40 34; B1 150; 5 113; EP I 341

When I meet a bonny lassie My heart burns in my breast, C3 133; 20 II 75; LP 732

When I meet Phillis [or Peggy] in my morning walk, C1 20a; 1 68; 4 103; VM I 189; AS 14; T I 108; EP II 15

When I met wi her I coud wish for my own, A10 11; EP II 434

When I visit a spot I have witnessd before, A31 94; MP II 97

When I was young I fell in love and got but little good on't, C3 259; 20 II 133; LPJC 219; TSP 331; LP 798; K 90

When ignorance only a licence can claim, A57 65

When in melancholly mood, A57 56; B6 2; Pfz Misc 196, 106 9 (ClJ 209); MP IV 556

When in summer thou walkest, C3 85; 20 I 122; 20 II 47; T II 504; LPJC 201; LP 408

When in the dance we used to stand, B9 70

When in thy sight I felt supremely blest (fragment), A42 103

When Jenny was here I was seldom alone, 20 I 337; LP 606

When Jimmy did leave me the thorns wer in blossom, A40 45a; B2 206; EP II 208

When last meeting Mary the scene it was cheery, A10 18a; EP II 451

When lifes tempests blow high, C3 37 etc; 20 II 20, 195; LPJC 199; LP 684; OA 399; GS 338

When lingering suns in sumer sets, C2 61; 1 71; 4 72; EP I 97

When lovers to each other true, C2 68; 1 90; 4 117; EP I 122

When maidens met love's budding spring, B4 108

When melted snow leaves bare the black green rings, A19 R9; A31 R183; T II 57; JC [5]; LC 40; LPL 14

When midnight comes a host of dogs & men, B9 64; T II 333; JR 92; JC [8]; LC 52; TSP 231; WS 82; X 103; DW [23]; EF 109; CC 50; OA 246; W 161; GS 121; NS 27; PR 83; JCSC 46

When milking comes then home the maiden wends, A61 48; NS 68

When mountains billows roar amain, 1 118; EP I 183

When natures beauty shines compleat, B2 201; VM I 143; T I 251; EP II 201

When nights last hours like haunting spirits creep, SCVS 210; T I 399; GG 104; MP I 325

When noisey bullocks haunt path crossing grounds (fragment), MP II 352

When once the sun sinks in the west, A40 40; A54 384; B4 R105; AS 87; T I 517; GG 113; WS 48; X 89; CC 58; RM 122; MC 432; MP IV 260

When one brood from hid bawling noises fled, A61; NS 93

When ones been walking in the open plain, 17 11; T II 127; JR 64; WS 25; MP II 301

When others, fearful of the Gloom, C2 66; 1 31; 4 82; EP I 50

When Pilgrim with a heavy pack, T II 66

When reason & religion goes a benting, 19 32; LP 177

When resolution with a jiant hand (fragment), MP II 334

When saucy Ale and I were young, LP 22

When shall I see the white thorn leaves agen, C4 145; 20 II 303; T II 445; LPJC 258; WS 59; BP 133; OA 417; LP 961; V 181; PR 78

When spring comes again love, C3 355; 20 II 179; LP 844

When spring comes unwelcome to the lovers eye[s], C3 263; 20 II 135; LP 800

When spring shall come with mirth and joy, A46 54

When storms like beasts of prey and terror sting (fragment), A21 158

When strolling in the fields in pleasant hours (fragment), D17

When that the even is hanging so glooming, A11 5a; B2 268; EP II 367

When the bloom on the black thorn shines white in the sun, A54 333; B8 109; MC 374; MP IV 138

When the glittering daylight leaves, C4 315; 20 II 402; LP 1054

When the golden evening came (fragment), A59 75

When the lark sings time to rise (fragment), A59 83

When the new moon comes wi its slender horns (deleted fragment) MP II 14

When the sabbath it comes to the green, 20 I 39; LP 311

When the sheep are in the pen And the cows are in the shed, C3 151; 20 II 81; LP 740

When the sloe f[l]owers in bloom upon March's chill bosom, C3 211; 20 II 108; LP 772

When the son of man comes in his glory anew, 6 35; LP 149; C 91

When the sun is weary, home, A8 25

When thy eye was all brightness with virgin reflection, A28 10; MP II 30

When trembling genius makes her first essay, A40 37; B1 47; 7 69; EP I 511

When trouble haunts me, need I sigh, A57 23; PCFM 94; T II 274

When violets and primroses bloom on the plain, C3 231; 20 II 118; LP 783

When wars alarms enticed my Willy from me, B7 18; FT 182; MP II 275

When we look back on what we were, B6 R205; T II 27

When we met last love on midsummer even, EP II 57

When we read in time's pages, B4 25

When we stray far away from the old pleasant village, 20 I 284; OA 386; LP 556

When with our little ones we spent, LP 10

When woodbine blossoms twining high, EP I 487

When words refuse before the crowd (First Love), X 17

When young love sped upon its happy race (fragment), A42 103

Whence comes this coldness, prithee say, A40 90a; B7 7; T II 209; MP IV 416

Whence go the swallow tribes the pathless main, A49 33; T II 66; BP 38; MP II 208

Whene'er thou wandered out at evening hour (fragment), A42 103

Where are hearts that cannot praise, MP II 313

Where are the citys Sodom & Gomorrah, 19 120; LP 211

Where are the pillows which they skys command (stray couplet), MP II 127

Where are ye going so soon in the morning (fragment), A59 103

Where are you going lovely maid, PJCM 61; LP 32

Where art thou wandering little child, B2 240a; VM II 29; AS 41; PCFM 68; T I 247; X 111; EP II 297

Where centuries past their glooms hath [cast], B3 89

Where clumps of bramble berries are, A47 13; BN 23

W[h]ere curl the brook waves sparkling leaps (stray couplet) MP II 13

Where does comfort's bosom glow, A59 58; B6 73; MaC 26; T II 288

Where doth true [or lorn] Love dwell, 20 I 191; LP 476

Where ducks dive in the silent water, C3 41; 20 II 22; PJCM 169; X 188; LP 686

[Where go the swallow tribes?: see Whence go the swallow tribes?]

Where goeth shadows when night hides the sun (stray couplet), MP II 332

Wher[e] hae ye been sae far awae, 20 I 24; LP 295

Where have you been to John Randall, my son, A37 40; B7 32; 18 3; FT 151; MP IV 544

Where is the heart thou once hast won, A28 9; A40 70; A54 281; 32 58; LM (Sep 1821) 273; T II 76; RM 63; MC 308; L 206; GS 131; MP IV 25

Where John goes bed at noon bonny Jenny O, C3 273; 20 II 141; LP 805

Where last years leaves & weeds decay, 19 93; T II 438; LPJC 148; LP 227

Where lonesome woodlands close surrounding, A4 6; B1 117; 5 118; PD 116; NG 34; T I 85; EP I 438; K 8

Where mossey oaks & hazel bushes gr[ow], H23; LP 236

Where no strife comes but in the songs, B6 11

Where nodding ducks follow the littered corn (fragment), A59 97

Where on bridge wall or gate or trees smooth bark, EP II 492

W[h]ere[ ]over many a stile neath willows grey, A13 12; B6 R142; SCVS 119; L 187; CT 38; MP I 192

Where slanting banks are always with the sun, A59 100; B6 181; T II 312; NS 15

Where the ash-tree weaves, 20 I 272; PJCM 156; LPJC 196; LP 545; GS 330; K 94

Where the broad sheepwalk opens bare and brown, A59 80; T II 281; JR 85; PM 73

Where the clear stream by the wild bank is wirling, A2 17; A11 5a; B2 268a; 3 166; EP II 121

Where the clear water rises to the brink, A61 76; T II 366; NS 83

Where the dark ivy the thorn tree is mounting, B2 152; Northumberland RO (ClJ 42); VM I 103; T I 250; OA 91; L 66; EP II 95

Where the dear with their shadows passed swifter than thought, PJCM 164; LP 1107

Where the hazels hing love, C3 369; 20 II 186; LPJC 231; LP 850

Where the poor sheep boy makes the sun his guide (fragment), A49 33

Where winding gash wirls round its widest scene, B1 73; D4 1; PD 149; T I 125; EP I 476

Where woodbine blossoms twining high, B1 58; D4 12

W[h]ere woodbines are wreathing & zephers are breathing, A10 18; EP II 449

Where eer the present leads us there we spy, A37 33; A51 59; T II 66; MP II 110

Where's joy so sweet enjoyed as in the fields (fragment), A57 2

While birdies wi their notes so sweet, 1 177; EP I 246

While fancy thrums the prinking strings, A40 35a; B1 22; D4 7; EP I 482

[While from the rustling scythe: see Syren of sullen moods & fading hues]

While I cull from history visions won, A37 45

While learned genius [or poets] rush to bold extremes [The Village Minstrel], A7 1; 3 167; VM I 3; T I 133; TSP 27; GG 44; CC 54; EP II 123

While sad oppression bears me down, A36 1; A40 105; MP IV 466

While swift the mail coach rattles up the hill, A40 41; B1 65; T I 371; EP I 536

While the sun is wearing home, EP II 400

While walking woods, a rotten tree (fragment), A57 R98

While we read in fame's page, A40 88; 33 6; L 388; MP IV 402

White butter flyes so thick in every lane (stray couplet), MP II 293

White flowering oer the tankard crown, A16 38; B2 233; EP II 280

Who am I my God & my Lord, 6 25; LP 115; C 59

Who could but love a face so fair, A50 R52; MP II 228

Who does not feel the grand sublimity, A23 10; EP II 537

Who hath not felt the influence that so calms, A54 434; A57 8; SPP 161; CC 13; MC 490; GS 86; MP IV 349

Who lives where Beggars rarley speed, A5 13; B1 153; 1 50, 51, 52; 5 58; T I 94; GG 40; EF 32; OA 59; W 48; EP I 78; K 10

Who loves the white thorn tree, 20 I 378; Ch 160; LP 643

Who nightly in his den does lye, C1 23; 1 77; 4 107; EP I 107

Who that as feelings would FW

Who that lives but owes Nan Thrale, B7 1; MP II 273

Who that looks upon thee love, A7 34a; EP II 397

Who would not envy such a pride of place, A61 24; NS 59

Whos that under my window, B4 46; FT 135; MP II 261

Whose wrecky stains dart on the floods away, A54 370; T II 140; MC 419; OA 194; MP IV 235

Why are ye silent, C4 141; 20 II 300; Ch 168; AS 154; T II 441; BP 127; OA 415; LP 959

Why do I tread my wilds around, A4 21; B1 68; EP I 439

Why is the cuckoos melody preferred, A46 R161; A54 345; 17 14, 16; T II 245; SPP 68; TSP 217; BP 101; RM 110; MC 391; OA 211; GS 105; E 42; MP IV 164

Why should mans high aspiring mind, A40 62a; A54 128; B3 51; D8 1; Ch 269; AS 142; T II 193; X 194; MC 138; L 336, 454; MP III 318

Why wish to see what other lands supplies, A50 R74

['Wi...' see 'With']

Wild delight of fairest feature, A5 52; A40 43a; B2 254; C2 51a; 4 54; OA 43; EP II 331

Wild winds no longer rustle in the wood, A4 1; B1 31; EP I 235

Wild woods ring, in echoes sound, A50 R77

Will Jockey come to day mither, 20 I 309; Ch 204; LP 581

Will ye gang a weeding dear, C3 217; 20 II 112; LP 776

Will ye gang wi' me to Scotland dear, 20 I 318; LP 589

Will you come to the camp in the pale moonlight, 20 I 168; MaC 46; T II 458; LP 457

William be honest, 'tis the wisest plan, F9; JCSJ 3 21

Wilt thou go with me sweet maid, 20 I 68; T II 513; PJCM 130; JR 130; GG 217; SPP 196; TSP 296; X 200; LP 347; OA 351; JCSJ 4 13; V 171; GS 334; JCSC 51; E 63; B 105; K 92

Winds sing their ancient dittys through the trees, A50 R40; Pfz. 198, 22 (ClJ 395); MP II 222

Wing-winnowing lark with speckled breast, 20 I 155; LPJC 172; LP 441; GS 316

Winter is come in earnest & the snow, A53 93; A54 431; T II 123; LC 45; WS 37; MC 487; OA 199; GS 76; PM 105; MP IV 344

Winter is nearly spent, 20 I 46; LP 319

Winter is past--the little bee resumes, B2 132; VM II 172; T I 267; EP II 55

Winter winds cold & blea, A16 64; B2 215; GG 119; TSP 171 OA 29; EP II 228

Winters gone the summer breezes, A5 41; B2 255; C2 40; 4 29; VM II 34; LM (Nov 1821) 543; AS 56; T I 93; TSP 23; EP II 334

Winters gone wi looks so saddend, A10 4a; EP II 389; FT 144

Wipes the curtain from the skies (fragment), A5 2

With all the pleasant things, A59 76; MaC 11; T II 286

With arms & legs at work & gentle stroke, A61 85; T II 346; JR 96; NS 90

With boots of monstrous leg & massy strength, A61 80; T II 351; NS 86

With careful step to keep his ballance up, A61 53; T II 345; EF 116; NS 72

With coal black hair and rose red face, C4 347; 20 II 421; LP 1071

Wi filial duty I adress thee mother, A5 33; B2 250; C2 41a; 4 32; VM II 154; T I 128; EP II 322

With folded arms and downward eye, A40 78a; B4 119; MP IV 388; K 27

With hand in waistcoat thrust the thresher goes, A61 55; T II 350; NS 74

With hands in pocket hid & buttoned up, A61 52; T II 349; EF 118; NS 71

With heart of brass and head of lead, A57 65

With hook tucked neath his arm that now & then, A61 54; OA 267; NS 73

With my hair down my back & bibbed up to my chin, A12 R14a; A40 51a; A54 307; MC 341; MP IV 79

With no mossy ruins for artists to prize, A30 177

With slate & bag at back & full of books, B9 92; T II 354; NS 42

Wi' spring's young lambs the sweet hedge violet comes (fragment), A31 78

With their huge bulks confront the setting sun (fragment), MP II 335

Wi' toil bright polished spade that glitters bright, A33 R4

[Withering and keen the winter comes: see Dithering & keen the winter comes]

Within a closes nook beneath a shed, A50 13; B8 61; CT 111; MP I 255

Within a pleasant lawn where pleasure strays, A59 95; B6 68; T II 316; BP 111; NS 13

With in the wood side ivy tree, MP II 246

Within a thick & spreading awthorn bush, A40 30; A54 352; B5 22; T II 245; LC 48; TSP 217; WS 64; LPL 2; BP 100; RM 115; MC 399; OA 210; JCSC 42; MP IV 186

Within this pleasant wood beside the lane, A54 374; T II 142; RM 145; MC 423; MP IV 243

Woes my sad heart sin in sorrow repining, 3 159; EP II 108

Woman had we never met, C4 251; 20 II 366; T II 521;LPJC 269; LP 1022; OA 421; GS 355

Woman tho ye turn away, 3 162; Ackerman's Repository (Oct 1821) 227; EP II 113

Women still are cold & jealous, B1 46; D4 14; EP I 492

Wood walks are pleasant every day, A54 257; A57 7; MC 278; MP III 565

Woodcroft thy castle many a story yields, A61 19; MaC 34; T II 358; NS 57

Words dare not speak of love its pains or mirth, MP II 325

Words paint not womans beauty springs young hour, A40 80 etc; A51 90; A54 386; B5 64; MC 434; MP IV 265

Words wrote by genius are eternity (fragment), A39 32

Wordsworth I love; his books are like the fields, PCJM 60; GG 178; X 207; LP 25

World friendship thou art often but a garb, A59 96; B6 99; NS 14

Would ye be taught ye feathered throng, 7 97; 357; MP II 345

Would'st thou but know where Nature clings, 20 I 93; T II 473; PJCM 125; TSP 287; LP 375; GS 310

Wrong not, sweet girl, my tender words, A59 33; B6 170

 

 

Ye brown old oaks that spread the silent wood, C1 26a; 1 117; 4 130; VM II 151; T I 119; EP II 23

Ye falling leaves that patter round, D4 9a; 1 242

Ye friends & joys of youth how fled, 3 161; EP II 111

Ye gay blinking daiseys a blooming so sweetly, A11 4a; A40 33a; B1 38; B2 267; 1 119; EP II 365

Ye hollow Winds that thro the Woodlands Rave, 1 146; EP I 212

Ye injur'd fields ere while so gay, A6 12; C2 60; 1 25; 4 69; VM II 48-52; T I 35; OA 62; W 71; EP II 11

Ye maidens that sunshine of beauty is warming, A10 16a; EP II 446

Ye meaner beauties cease your pride, B1 24; D4 9; 1 189; PD 74; EP I 262

Ye muses in the green wood shene, A11 9a; B2 272; EP II 376

Ye oaks spreading round me so mournful and green, 1 172

Ye peasantry of England, support your hardy name, B6 R203; 7 3

Ye pleasant meadows (fragment), MP II 287

Ye promisd me Mary last michaelmas fair, EP I 444

Ye scenes of desolation and despair, 5 123

Ye simple weeds that make the desert gay, A40 71a; A54 391; T I 524; RM 125; MC 439; MP IV 274

Ye spirits of the earth and air, 1 219; EP I 302

Ye swampy Falls of pasture ground, PD 102; NG 32; OA 66; EP I 367

Ye tip-top Southeys first in fame, A4 19; B1 10; 1 141; EP I 208

Ye waters fam'd the ills of life to heal, C2 27a; 1 10; 4 2; EP I 18

Yes my father pains distress thee, B1 41; EP I 544

Yes Ralph Natures made you both clumbsy & stout, 1 244; EP I 339

Yes you may talk of joy but as for me (stray couplet), MP II 252

Yesterday night I drest up for the dancing, B4 R97; 3 158; EP II 105

Yet chance will somtimes prove a faithless guest, A54 418; A57 36; T II 240; BP 91; MC 470; OA 236; MP IV 322

Yet down with crack & rustle branches come, A54 426; B6 55; MC 480; MP IV 334

Yet let no treason thoughts arise (fragment), A57 R102

Yet still I love my lonely watch to keep, 1 9

Yet still must I love, silly swain, 17 46

Yet still the little path winds on & on, A54 416; A57 33; T II 324; MC 468; MP IV 319

Yet this was a trifling thing unto thee, 7 29

Yet what am I? A robber: and why bring, T I 408

Yon cot holds all thats dear to me, A16 10; EP II 499

Yon cot that does in ruins lye, A40 42; B2 200a; EP II 199

Yon house that neighbours near the gloomy show, Pierpont Morgan MA 1320, pp. 40 6 (ClJ 386)

Yon mouldering wall compos'd of nought but mud, C2 71; 1 110; 4 123; T I 19; EP I 171

Yon sailing swans with arching necks, MP II 351

Yon summer bird its oft repeated note, MC 447; MP IV 290

Yon valleys bend & wood between, 3 161; EP II 112

You may find fortune in a farmer's house (fragments), A31 173

You promised me, a year ago, LP 11

You promised to meet me at e'en, C4 219; 20 II 347; LP 1004

Young Chloe looks sweet as the rose, A24 19; A31 85; 17 47; Ch 272; EP II 578

Young Damon for Delia Sighd, 1 203; EP I 292

Young Damon long lovd charming Bess of the vale, 1 173; EP I 241

Young Damon Wanton gay and wild, A3 93; A40 32; B1 146; EP I 407

Young farmer Bigg of this same flimsy class, SPP 19; CT 72

Young girls grow eager as the day retires, A18 R27 etc; A31 127; A40 104; A54 20; MC 23; SPP 55; MP III 69

Young Jemmy the pride of the Hamlett and mill, EP I 180

Young Jenny wakens at the dawn, 20 I 283; Ch 211; LP 555

Young Nanceys William for a Sailor press'd, 1 202; EP I 291

Young love is in the spring, LP 262

Young peggy the milking maid lusty and neat, C1 6; 1 104; EP I 151

Young Robin wanton gay and wild, 5 141

Your beauty like the sun (fragment), MP II 294

Youth has no fear of ill by no cloudy days anoyed, A40 119; A54 287; 30 95; Ch 266; T II 98; MC 317; L 509; GS 193; MP IV 37

Youth hath its joys love what they are, MP II 307

Youth revels at its rising hour, B3 95; B4 69

Youth speeds its spring tide like a princely flower, A18 55; A41 35; T I 531; MP II 138

Youth's bloom unchanged by grace, F10; JCSJ 3 22